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Gove strikes again

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by henriette, Dec 19, 2011.

  1. henriette

    henriette New commenter

    "An expert panel appointed by Mr Gove found that the curriculum in England narrows earlier than in countries with more successful education systems, where pupils are required to study key subjects like history for longer.

    As a result, many young people are ‘deprived of access to powerful forms of knowledge and experience at a formative time in their lives', the panel said.

    A move to make these subjects compulsory would tie in with the Government's new English Baccalaureate, - awarded to pupils who gain at least five Cs at GCSE in English, maths, science, history or geography and a foreign language."
     
  2. henriette

    henriette New commenter

    "An expert panel appointed by Mr Gove found that the curriculum in England narrows earlier than in countries with more successful education systems, where pupils are required to study key subjects like history for longer.

    As a result, many young people are ‘deprived of access to powerful forms of knowledge and experience at a formative time in their lives', the panel said.

    A move to make these subjects compulsory would tie in with the Government's new English Baccalaureate, - awarded to pupils who gain at least five Cs at GCSE in English, maths, science, history or geography and a foreign language."
     
  3. spsmith45

    spsmith45 New commenter

    A word of caution. When referring to "more successful" education systems we have to question the assumption that the data from surveys such as PISA is reliable. Mr Gove likes to quote from PISA, but I have read evidence that PISA's methodology is not reliable. The mere fact that countries seem to rise up and fall down their tables so quickly already suggests a lack of consistency.
    Michael Gove could read this:
    http://donaldclarkplanb.blogspot.com/2011/03/leaning-tower-of-pisa-7-serious-skews.html
    That said, I agree that British children do not learn enough history and geography. I am not persuaded about languages for all to 16, however. Just think why the previous government decided to make MFL optional. They had some good reasons.
     
  4. marmot.morveux

    marmot.morveux New commenter

    Surely, it might be easier to do the following; compulsory for those who have C or above targets, optional for everyone else, with an opt-out for anyone who has a serious argument for not doing a language. I would even suggest it would be beneficial to be able to dis-apply some pupils, with severe behavioural issues - this would work at my school. I do, however, see how this might not work at other schools. I would value your opinions on this....
     
  5. Random175

    Random175 New commenter

    I am not sure the findings are correctly expressed either. Many children on the continent as we all know start formal schooling later. In Denmark they play in their infant years, and hardly study anything at all in the 'junior' primary years - music, art, maths, Danish, English and PE just about sums it up. They don't begin learning science, history or geography until they are about 11 or 12 from then the curriculum is indeed much wider including another language or two and continues as such until students are about eighteen and usually further.
    The problem is that our children do not play enough at an early age and begin writing at about 3 or 4. What is the point of learning science at primary? However there is a point to learning languages. Of course one has to wonder whether on balance the most 'successful' education systems educate the least poor children.
     
  6. yasf

    yasf Occasional commenter

    chatting to Canadian and Finnish educators they generally ascribe it to the ethnically homogeneous nature of their populations. Apparently in the few areas where this is not the case, -such as Toronto and certain areas of Helsinki - the numbers begin to break down. As for China - by all accounts they bused in all their best students from around the country to take the tests in key cities. It should also be noted that the Finns are very progressive in their education. All mixed ability, inclusion, no grades until the last possible moment etc.
     

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