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Goodbye to EYFS?

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by giraffe77, Nov 12, 2010.

  1. [​IMG] I can empathise with that. As a supply teacher, why is that the person I am covering is on outside duty? Funny that...
     
  2. sadika

    sadika New commenter

    I am amazed that the FSP has remained for so long ... virtually the same as when it was first introduced ... I for one would celebrate if it was ditched! I do think children need some assessment but the FSP is not the way to do it. I can't believe how much "homage" is paid to it - number crunching gone mad - % here there and everywhere of children who have achieved so many scale points are are compared according to sex, age, what they have for lunch etc ... so a summer born boy on free school meals doesn't "perform" as well as an autumn born girl eating a lunch her parents have paid for - "rocket" science stuff?????
     
  3. Yes, but this is because SLT have wanted to use the FSP as a baseline and tracker for children to show value added as they progress through school. We are likely to see more, not less of this sort of nonsense if the EYFS is abandoned. Children will be baselined using measures that are more compatable with KS1 and KS2 testing and then they will be tutored to achieve objectives which are far removed from the relatively child-centred profile statements. For instance, more weight wil be given to the Literacy and Maths areas and PSED will become less important (it's not measured at KS1/2).
     
  4. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Lead commenter

    Well then we will have to bring out the EPPE and Speel research again, won't we? Which is where EYFS comes from...
    but there ain't no research as far as I know, that suggests that rigourous assessment and baseline and tracking and even target setting, has any impact on the future achievement and attainment of our young.......
     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Perhaps they might even read Robin Alexander's Primary Review ...
     
  6. sadika

    sadika New commenter

    RE: For instance, more weight wil be given to the Literacy and Maths areas and PSED will become less important (it's not measured at KS1/2).

    Yes - why has PSED never managed to continue into KS1 and KS2???? Whena child goes into Y1 does this very important aspect not matter enough anymore????
     
  7. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    In KS1/2 PSED becomes PSHE
     
  8. sadika

    sadika New commenter

    Yes but who actually pays the same attention to this as in FS? What about assessment and acting on it?
     
  9. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I think any school that fails to pay attention to PSE is failing their pupils ... I can't actually comment if some schools are failing ...
     
  10. It certainly seems to go off the boil. It seems to become a discrete subject. SEAL units are used. I don't know how appropriate it is as a discrete subject, it's as if learnt knowledge of what good social skills look like is expected to translate into the ability to use good social skills. And, obviously, it's not as simple as that. The way PSED is interwoven into everything that goes on in the EYFS is a much more effective way of addressing personal and social education, in my view.
    Assessment is a problem too. Someone could pass with flying colours as a young child, then get into patterns of bad behaviour and fail at age 11. This doesn't mean they haven't made progress, it just means that they are less dependent on adults to dictate their behaviour and are trying out other types of behaviour dictated by selves and peers. Then some really take a dip at age 14 and start acting like 2 year olds again!
     
  11. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    It has been identified that PSED is the best indicator of future success as an adult so foolish to ignore it.
    Unhappy children with low self esteem and poor attitudes don't learn effectively
     
  12. rouseau22

    rouseau22 New commenter

    Oh oh oh!!! I might become a teacher again!! I love the Early Years, and I like learning through play AND formal learning too. But I cracked under the strain of all the pointless assessment and updating the profile evenings weekends and holidays. all the stress and pressure.[​IMG]
    Say its gonna happen!!!!!!!!!! [​IMG]
     
  13. I hope all you 'principled' early years zealots will pack your bags and take yourselves off to Finland or wherever it is you are always banging on about being a child-paradise.
     
  14. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    too late SOAPy KS1 is the place to be
     
  15. I'd love to go to KS1, but fear I will be in Early Years till I retire. My knees ache with getting up and down to small children, I am so very unimpressed with all the assessmenst and observations we end up doing at the moment. Long, long ago, when I first worked in Early Years Each LEA or School had it's own system of assessing, then came 'Stepping Stones' OMG what a chore that became....it's just got worse ever since. Get to know our children through play, tasks in small groups or with individuals and assess half termly, it is enough. When parents are informed and shown how much their little dears are watched and assessed they are generally horrified, and so they should be. My son doing GCSE's gets less assesment and marking in his work than the 3/4 year olds I am teaching. It is wrong, bury EYFS.[​IMG]
     
  16. I totally agree. I think it is both unnecessary and somewhat Orwellian.
     
  17. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Now come on, thumbie. Be assertive. I've done a lot of supply in my time and know exactly what you mean, but a head round the door and a confident 'excuse me but when are we swapping?' usually ****** a conscience or two.
     
  18. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Our nursery children - flat-bred Londoners, most of them - can't wait to get outside to play. I dread dirty weather.
     
  19. Whatever is happening, we need to show that we want to be involved in any modifications to the EYFS. Perhaps we should pre-empt any decisions by writing/ringing /emailing the powers that be to offer our collective expertise and opinions. Does anyone have access to up to date contact details for this?
     
  20. Does anyone know what the results were of the consultation process and the review?
     

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