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"Good" cheating v "Bad" cheating - AQA GCSE ICT controlled assessments

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by compisbest, Dec 9, 2011.

  1. Answers on a post card. Are these examples of "good" cheating or "bad" cheating? Should Ofqual care, given that they seem to care little about any standards, if we are to believe the Telegraph?
    1) Unit 3 - pupils have to be given a choice of assignments and should pick one. Some teachers however have a class all doing the same assignment. How is this possible? Is it because a) the teacher 'encouraged' them all to do this or b) chance? With 32 students in a class, the odds of all the pupils picking the same assignment assignment is a little
    over 4 000,000,000. Pupils must be given a choice, but is it "good" cheating to then effectively deny pupils that choice? The Exam Board does not ask schools to account for this highly unlikely situation.Ofqual does not ask AQA to account for this situation in so many schools.
    2) Unit 3 Assignment e.g. "How to organise a school prom" - the one discussed at teacher training days. The teacher decides to set up and practice an identical task, except it is called "How to organise a Christmas party". Absolutely every task that they have to do is identical to the school prom task. The class does it togethe. They discuss each and every task, the teacher corrects mistakes and the pupils fill their folder with fabulous examples of each task. Then they do the "How to organise a school prom" task on their own - except all it involves is copying the "How to organise a Christmas party" task and changing 'Christmas party' to 'prom' in each task (and the odd logo from Santa to a set of pupils).
    3) School A does unit 2 like an exam. 25 hours. Work on own. No talking. No work taken home. A few A grades but mostly distributed across the grades and slightly lower than predicted ones. School B is more relaxed. unit 2 is not done like an exam. Pupils can talk, discuss what they've done, use the Internet but all work is done in front of a teacher. Grades in line with predicted grades or slightly better. School C is sure that it is okay to let pupils do what they want and they can take work home and finish it off, and can take work home and do it as well if they like. The teacher (of course) will sign it off as similar work to what the pupil normally produces so it is okay to do this. The Head is soo happy. lots of children have done better than predicted grades.
     
  2. Answers on a post card. Are these examples of "good" cheating or "bad" cheating? Should Ofqual care, given that they seem to care little about any standards, if we are to believe the Telegraph?
    1) Unit 3 - pupils have to be given a choice of assignments and should pick one. Some teachers however have a class all doing the same assignment. How is this possible? Is it because a) the teacher 'encouraged' them all to do this or b) chance? With 32 students in a class, the odds of all the pupils picking the same assignment assignment is a little
    over 4 000,000,000. Pupils must be given a choice, but is it "good" cheating to then effectively deny pupils that choice? The Exam Board does not ask schools to account for this highly unlikely situation.Ofqual does not ask AQA to account for this situation in so many schools.
    2) Unit 3 Assignment e.g. "How to organise a school prom" - the one discussed at teacher training days. The teacher decides to set up and practice an identical task, except it is called "How to organise a Christmas party". Absolutely every task that they have to do is identical to the school prom task. The class does it togethe. They discuss each and every task, the teacher corrects mistakes and the pupils fill their folder with fabulous examples of each task. Then they do the "How to organise a school prom" task on their own - except all it involves is copying the "How to organise a Christmas party" task and changing 'Christmas party' to 'prom' in each task (and the odd logo from Santa to a set of pupils).
    3) School A does unit 2 like an exam. 25 hours. Work on own. No talking. No work taken home. A few A grades but mostly distributed across the grades and slightly lower than predicted ones. School B is more relaxed. unit 2 is not done like an exam. Pupils can talk, discuss what they've done, use the Internet but all work is done in front of a teacher. Grades in line with predicted grades or slightly better. School C is sure that it is okay to let pupils do what they want and they can take work home and finish it off, and can take work home and do it as well if they like. The teacher (of course) will sign it off as similar work to what the pupil normally produces so it is okay to do this. The Head is soo happy. lots of children have done better than predicted grades.
     

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