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Good books for bereaved children

Discussion in 'Primary' started by lollyxx, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. Hi all... Wonder if anyone can help. Very sadly on Friday we lost an ex pupil who left us last year, I currently have her brother in my class and so after half term the whole class will be in need of some support. Can anyone recommend any good books to open a circle time discussion? I want to be able to support them in any way i can. I have years 5/6.

    Thanks for any help you can give.

    Xx
     
  2. Hi all... Wonder if anyone can help. Very sadly on Friday we lost an ex pupil who left us last year, I currently have her brother in my class and so after half term the whole class will be in need of some support. Can anyone recommend any good books to open a circle time discussion? I want to be able to support them in any way i can. I have years 5/6.

    Thanks for any help you can give.

    Xx
     
  3. invincible

    invincible New commenter

    I've not used it myself but some friends have recommended the book "Badger'S Parting Gifts". Don't know if it would be good for your age group though. Hope someone else has some feeback and ideas for you. Hard job for you. Good luck with it.
     
  4. Thanks... That's the only one I could think about but didn't know if there was a better one.. Thanks xxx
     
  5. invincible

    invincible New commenter

    There was another one I remember from my training days, something to do with a butterfly if I recall rightly, but can't remember the title. I was quite impressed with the idea of it too. Hope someone else knows the book I mean.
     
  6. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Water bugs and dragonflies is nice- its non religious but hints at some sort of afterlife. The next place is lovely, can't remember who wrote it but I used this a lot with children who were bereaved and it was great for generating discussion. Muddles, puddles and sad things (think that's what it's called) from winstons wish is a great tool, a workbook for bereaved children, grandpa by John burningham is great for younger children. Michael Rosen's sad book ( you will cry,it gets me every time) sad isn't bad (can't remember the author) . Hope these help. Winstons wish website is a great resource. Good luck x
     
  7. marlin

    marlin Star commenter

  8. Check out the 'Penhaligon's Friends' booklet 'Remember Me' for information about dealing with bereavement in a school (not a story book).

    www.penhaligonsfriends.org.uk
     
  9. Sorry but I would strongly recommend you do not instigate any circle time discussion when the brother is present or offer him any books, etc, unless asked to by the child himself.
    This comes on the basis of 25+ years of Yr6 or 5/6 experience, losing a child, being a bereaved child and also a befriender for Compassionate Friends (Google if you have not heard of it)
    School is a place for children to escape.... not to continue feeling their pain. Often, they deal with the pain much more quickly than adults and need this. However, you should be ready to listen and accept if they need to talk or cry..... and privately is best.
    When my daughter died, the only book I liked for my other children was the Velveteen Rabbit, but they were yr 2 and 3 at the time.

     
  10. clawthorpegirl

    clawthorpegirl New commenter

    I agree with Gertie. We've had a run of family bereavements at school including losing parents and siblings (different families) and all the advice we've had, including from the children, echoes Gerties advice.
    If it's usual for you to share a picture book with your class then perhaps use some of the suggested books but not otherwise.
    With one of the children in my class (Y2), who lost Mum after a long battle with cancer, I've provided some small emotion faces and if she wants to let me know how shes feeling she pops one on my desk or hands one to me or TA. We acknowledge it ( i.e. I can see you're feeling really sad just now) and ask her if we can do anything, so far shes always said no.
    I was really concerned what to do or say when I first saw her after Mum died but in the end she came in as normal, after about a week off, and I just said how very pleased we were to see her.
    Please make sure you and the other staff are taking care of each too, its hard for everyone especially when it's a child you knew.
     
  11. Go-Givers does a good powerpoint about bereavement called 'Treasured Memories'.
    It is free to register on the site and to use the resources.
    www.gogivers.org
     
  12. I'm currently doing supply, and in the year 5 class I taught last week there was a girl who had just lost her grandmother. The teacher had suggested she could make a 'memory box', ie a shoe box filled with photos and anything that reminded her of her grandmother/things they had done together, and she was allowed to stay in for a few lunchtimes, and decorate it together with her friend. This seemed to work really well for her - just an idea, might not work for everybody though.
     

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