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GIS in school

Discussion in 'Geography' started by birrboy, Oct 15, 2012.

  1. I'm a bit too long in the tooth to have used GIS for my degree but I'd like to introduce it at KS3/4. Any pointers please, esp software and applications to topics that work well.
    Thanks in advance.
    b
     
  2. I'm a bit too long in the tooth to have used GIS for my degree but I'd like to introduce it at KS3/4. Any pointers please, esp software and applications to topics that work well.
    Thanks in advance.
    b
     
  3. I use Google Earth as its free and easy to use. There are some ideas to get you started http://www.juicygeography.co.uk/googleearth.htm. Also the GA run some good CPD courses. Good luck.
     
  4. You should perhaps consider Quantum GIS. Its free OpenSource software, easily downloadable and free shapefiles and data for topics such as earthquakes, hurricanes and so on can be found quite quickly.
    MS
     
  5. I have found it's very difficult to get into the curriculum. Firstly the security software at school often blocks things such as arc gis and even google earth. Secondly it can be difficult to get the shapefiles etc you need particularly if school doesnt want to spend money on them. Thirdly I find having large numbers of pupils using GIS completely cripples the schools IT and internet connection.
    If anybody has ideas on how to get round these or easy ways to get decent data and shapefiles let me know.
     
  6. There are many phone apps that could be useful in the classroom - depending on your school policy, student phones could become a useful resource! I actually lent out GPS tracking devices to my students and they had to map a journey they took for homework.
     
  7. You need to talk nicely to your IT techs, but expect to find that they will know next to nothing about GIS. Ideally, any computer room that runs GIS should have a dedicated server. Also, the students should be assigned computers for the duration of what you are doing and work from a short named folder straight off the C Drive. This will help, as will having the GIS installed directly on each computer. Running a GIS from a server is painful and will bung up the system.
    A good way to create your own shapefiles with students is to take GPS out and around the school and map points. These are then put into a spreadsheet and can be used to make a layer that can be rectified to an aerial photo (Google Earth is good for this). The school my kids went to in Aus used to map vegetation at the rural campus and measure changes each year, using GPS in the field and ArcView in the classroom.
    The Uni of Edinburgh (Edina) also have loads of data that is available to researchers and anyone with a university login (know anyone?)
    If you need any more ideas, I have my uni GIS labs and data (all Aussie) and can probably come up with some more ideas.
     
  8. Arc Explorer online is a great free resource to use in your lessons. There are thousands of data sets available which can be added to the map. The Geomatics teaching group at Newcastle University can also help you incorporate GIS into your syllabus, either by running sessions with your class or by providing resources. You can find a list of the activities they offer by following this link and looking under 'Geography'




    http://toolkit.ncl.ac.uk/




    Rachel
     
  9. Good resources for us include the following....
    Use the maps on the websites and you can make some good activities for students. How much crime in your local area? Is your area in danger of flooding? That type of thing, worked well for us.[​IMG]

    Good Luck!
     

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