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Gifted pupils in primary mathematics

Discussion in 'Primary' started by thedancingqueen, Mar 8, 2011.

  1. I'm starting placement in three weeks or so and the teacher has said that I have two mathematically gifted children in my class. Completely new experience for me. Can you share some of your experiences of teaching gifted pupils/ a gifted pupil in primary mathematics please and share what made them different from other pupils in terms of the strategies they used, etc. Were they good at coping with symbols? Flexible in their approaches?
    Thanks.
     
  2. I'm starting placement in three weeks or so and the teacher has said that I have two mathematically gifted children in my class. Completely new experience for me. Can you share some of your experiences of teaching gifted pupils/ a gifted pupil in primary mathematics please and share what made them different from other pupils in terms of the strategies they used, etc. Were they good at coping with symbols? Flexible in their approaches?
    Thanks.
     
  3. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Which year group will you be in? Gifted in year 2 is likely to be somewhat different to gifted in year 6.

    But whatever you do, make sure they have plenty of opportunity to use their skills and knowledge in unfamiliar investigative ways, don't just move them upwards. Ask the teacher what she does, so you know what the children are used to .

    Good Luck and enjoy it...fabulous mathematicians can have a great deal of logical fun.
     
  4. Year 5 but I'm interested in hearing about experiences from any year group. I'm just generally interested, so all experiences welcome. I don't need any specific advice.
     
  5. Andrew Jeffrey

    Andrew Jeffrey New commenter

    This sounds like an interesting one -lucky you! I would be thinking in terms of stretching their thinking (rather than merely accelerating them as was rightly pointed out earlier.)

    I would be giving them things like "What do you think would happen if...?" or "How can we be sure of that?" or 'How many ways are there to find 23 x 17?" or 'What is the hardest calculation you reckon you could still just about do?" or - oh, you get the idea!
    Enjoy! And don't be afraid to tell them if you don't know - finding out together is quite valid.
     
  6. Andrew Jeffrey

    Andrew Jeffrey New commenter

    Oops, sorry, I just read the bit about not needing any specific advice. Please ignore my post!
     

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