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Getting over a driving mistake

Discussion in 'Personal' started by giraffe, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    I'm finding it hard to forget about a silly driving mistake I made earlier this morning. Will you indulge me in posting here so that I can get it out of my system? Helpful and consoling comments very welcome.


    My driving is usually pretty smooth nowadays, nearly a year after passing my test. I am a safe and considerate driver. I occasionally make minor mistakes, but not often.
    Today at a junction as I was turning right onto a main road, I underestimated the curve of the kerb and went right up onto it with both right wheels for a couple of yards. It was a grassed verge-roundabout sort of area, so not a pavement or anything risky to pedestrians. I was going slowly in a low enough gear and kept fairly good steering, despite a solid bump up and back down onto the road.
    Checked my tyres and steering afterwards; seem fine as far as I can feel.
    Scared myself poopless and feeling very disheartened about it. Embarassed about who saw it and what they might be saying to themselves about silly women drivers.
     
  2. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    I'm finding it hard to forget about a silly driving mistake I made earlier this morning. Will you indulge me in posting here so that I can get it out of my system? Helpful and consoling comments very welcome.


    My driving is usually pretty smooth nowadays, nearly a year after passing my test. I am a safe and considerate driver. I occasionally make minor mistakes, but not often.
    Today at a junction as I was turning right onto a main road, I underestimated the curve of the kerb and went right up onto it with both right wheels for a couple of yards. It was a grassed verge-roundabout sort of area, so not a pavement or anything risky to pedestrians. I was going slowly in a low enough gear and kept fairly good steering, despite a solid bump up and back down onto the road.
    Checked my tyres and steering afterwards; seem fine as far as I can feel.
    Scared myself poopless and feeling very disheartened about it. Embarassed about who saw it and what they might be saying to themselves about silly women drivers.
     
  3. It happens every day. :¬))
    My daughter passed her test in December and bought her first car at the beginning of this month. Her intention is to drive to and from Uni (15 miles away) however any little mistake throws her completely. Her biggest panic inducing event is stalling at a junction. I had to admit to her that (having driven for 30 odd years) I stalled in a very hazardous position yesterday.
    What I am trying to say is these things happen. Add the "failure " to your experience locker...you'll know next time. :¬))
     
  4. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    Thank you Bauble. Much appreciated.
    I know really that it wasn't a major thing and that I will have learned from it, it's just sooo, you know, embarassing. Misjudgement.
    If only there was some way of learning from experience without having to go through the experiences in the first place..
     
  5. Joe 90 managed it.
     
  6. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    But he was a little creep!
     
  7. lindenlea

    lindenlea Star commenter

    You are a human being. You make mistakes. It's really important to learn - really learn - that everyone makes mistakes. What makes you think you've got to be perfect.
    Cheer up1 You got away with it!
     
  8. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I learned to drive aged 31. For at least the first three years after passing my test, I was still getting occasional 'Aaaaaggghhh!' moments, when a relatively minor situation (or its potential for disaster in my mind) like the one you describe would make my bum go funny.
    22 years later, I drive as automatically as walking and talking, but I can still remember how scary it sometimes felt.
    It passes, honestly!
     
  9. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    So the cyclist I took out on my way to work a few years back doesn't count then? It was quite spectacular as they flew across the bonnet of the car to land in a crumpled heap on the other side. The bike wasn't so useful afterwards either! Luckily the damage to the paintwork came out with T cut!

    Cost me a new wheel and helmet for the bike and rider.
     
  10. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I meant that feeling terrified when a minor incident happens passes.
    Any of us, no matter how experienced, can still make both minor and major errors whilst driving.
     
  11. lurk_much

    lurk_much Occasional commenter

    [​IMG]
    drivers clip kerbs regularly
    it is better not to
    what was the problem again?

     
  12. Pageant

    Pageant Occasional commenter

    Many, many moons ago I drove over the edge of a pavement during my driving test ........... amazingly I passed first time [​IMG]
    Not so very many years ago I was waiting to turn right off a main road. There was nothing at all behind me but the traffic coming towards me so busy that I was waiting to turn for quite a while. Next thing I know was a bus coming up behind me and I just knew it hadn't seen me but I (stupidly) froze so did nothing and it hit me from behind and wrote off my car (which was old so worthless to anyone but me).
    I just knew agfterwards that if I hadn't frozen I could have got out of the way of the bus by simply driving forward away from my right turn but I was so shocked I just there.[​IMG]
    I haven't driven over any more pavement edges and I always watch traffic coming behind me.
    You live and learn [​IMG]


     
  13. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    Thank you so much. Feeling better about it now.
     
  14. 576

    576 Established commenter

    Sorry - but are you overseas?
    Because in the UK we drive on the left - so if you manage to get your right wheels up on the kerb whilst turning right - you are on the wrong side of the road (unless it's in a one way system)
     
  15. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    LoL! I'm not that bad!
    It's two lanes going onto a roundabout with main road dual carriageway coming up from left. As I turned, checking for anything coming from the left, I must have oversteered a bit and went up onto the grass briefly with both right wheels.
     
  16. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

  17. marymoocow

    marymoocow Star commenter


    I learnt quite late as well and consider myself a good safe driver. However 6 months after I passed, I pulled into a busy petrol station and pulled across to the next queue when a pump became available. The trouble was I overcompensated to avoid a van that was probably miles away, hit the hose knocking it off the pump and had to be rescued by the forecourt attendant in front of everyone. Left a nice dent in my front wing too.
    2 years in, I went into the back of someone because I glanced at something at the side of a road and didnt see them stopping. It should have been a slight shunt at most if not completely avoided but I panicked and went into a fetal position, taking my feet <u>off</u> the pedals and covered my face with my hands. The policeman remarked that there were no signs of breaking. I tried to explain that I had seen the car in time, just panicked but I dont think he believed me.[​IMG]
    I still sometimes catch a kerb, especially when I am tired, so dont worry, though do check your tyres if you do as I was in a bad accident as a child after the tyre blew out after a bad scrape.
     
  18. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    Yes, thanks.
    Obviously, being human, there are going to be times when we make mistakes and we can only do our best to prevent or minimise the harm. I look around at my neighbours cars and see that most have had a scrape or small dent somewhere. If no one ever made a mistake, car insurance would be a tenner a year I suppose!
    As a latecomer to the driving lark, a perfectionist, <strike>blessed</strike> cursed with a vivid imagination, and a tendency to blame myself with all the ills of the world, I am bound to have a hard time of it occasionally. Fortunately, I am making fewer mistakes and not repeating those I do make.
    Wish I'd gotten over all this learning thing as a teenager - grown ups like us are supposed to be infallible, aren't we?[​IMG]
     
  19. guinnesspuss

    guinnesspuss Star commenter

    Ye gods and little fishes!
    I passed my test 36 years ago and I reversed out of a parking space and clipped the post I was parked next to last year. Mr GP took out his bumper last week on an unseen kerb in a car park. Stuff happens giraffe, don't worry. Have you seen the number of dented cars?
    [​IMG]
     
  20. That's really, really not fair!! I did the same and failed because of it [​IMG]
    (But I know the examiner did it on purpose).

    After more than two decades of driving, I have not yet had an accident that was my fault, but I've put enough scratches and dents in my car to put me off ever buying new - don't think I could cope if I bought a brand new car and scratched it! [​IMG]
     

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