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Getting classes onboard as a temporary teacher

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by hamilton944, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. Im an art & design teacher working in a secondary school covering a maternity leave until June 2012. Previous to this this post I have worked in terrific grammar schools where behaviour management was rarely needed - a quick telling off was usually enough to sort out any problems! Ive been in the new post for a month now and feel I am struggling to get most of my classes really on board - even in top band classes there are small pockets of pupils taking part in frequent low level disruption and more ( chatting when im giving instruction, wandering around depsite being clearly told (calmly in most cases!) to remain in seats etc.There are also some fairly challenging kids in other classes who refuse to follow any sort of instruction at all.
    I feel because of my previous experience in my other schools, my classroom management skills need sharpening up. Its surely not too late after only a month in the job to turn things around? I have tried seating plans and some lunctime detentions etc, do i keep plugging away with these? Because its a practical subject and I am moving around a lot I dont feel it suitable to keep a checklist of names and levels in the kinds of discipline structures ive been reading about.
    I do realise consistency and some sense of structure is important, so I was thinking of a simple ' first warning, second warning, lunctime detention' process. I do have a good HOD who is happy to have offenders in her class etc so I can try that too. When I took over I spent 5 mins at the start of each class going my rules, but having gauged the situation realise this may not have been enough. At this stage should I step back and spend time having pupils write rules in their workbooks, and also the consequences etc.
    I'd be so grateful of any advice in this situation, The seven months I have left to go seems a long stretch at this point and I dont want to limit myself to only applying for grammar school jobs, there are so few going I know I cant be that choosy! I love teaching the subject and know from past experience that I can do it really well but im feeling low about my currrent situation.
     
  2. Im an art & design teacher working in a secondary school covering a maternity leave until June 2012. Previous to this this post I have worked in terrific grammar schools where behaviour management was rarely needed - a quick telling off was usually enough to sort out any problems! Ive been in the new post for a month now and feel I am struggling to get most of my classes really on board - even in top band classes there are small pockets of pupils taking part in frequent low level disruption and more ( chatting when im giving instruction, wandering around depsite being clearly told (calmly in most cases!) to remain in seats etc.There are also some fairly challenging kids in other classes who refuse to follow any sort of instruction at all.
    I feel because of my previous experience in my other schools, my classroom management skills need sharpening up. Its surely not too late after only a month in the job to turn things around? I have tried seating plans and some lunctime detentions etc, do i keep plugging away with these? Because its a practical subject and I am moving around a lot I dont feel it suitable to keep a checklist of names and levels in the kinds of discipline structures ive been reading about.
    I do realise consistency and some sense of structure is important, so I was thinking of a simple ' first warning, second warning, lunctime detention' process. I do have a good HOD who is happy to have offenders in her class etc so I can try that too. When I took over I spent 5 mins at the start of each class going my rules, but having gauged the situation realise this may not have been enough. At this stage should I step back and spend time having pupils write rules in their workbooks, and also the consequences etc.
    I'd be so grateful of any advice in this situation, The seven months I have left to go seems a long stretch at this point and I dont want to limit myself to only applying for grammar school jobs, there are so few going I know I cant be that choosy! I love teaching the subject and know from past experience that I can do it really well but im feeling low about my currrent situation.
     
  3. Dunteachin

    Dunteachin Star commenter

    If you go to the Behaviour and Classroom management collection in Teaching Resources, you will find a wealth of advice from Tom Bennett.
     

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