1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Getting a lid on my class!!

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by lillipad, Jun 6, 2010.

  1. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Been with my new class for 6 weeks now and am determined to go in this half term and get a lid on them, with their behaviour, attitudes to learning and to each other. I am with them until next year now so I want to get this sorted now so that i don't have long term problems.

    Any suggestions as to how I can go in tomorrow and show them I mean business?!
     
  2. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Been with my new class for 6 weeks now and am determined to go in this half term and get a lid on them, with their behaviour, attitudes to learning and to each other. I am with them until next year now so I want to get this sorted now so that i don't have long term problems.

    Any suggestions as to how I can go in tomorrow and show them I mean business?!
     
  3. Hi lillipad,

    From your message am I taking it you are primary? I'm secondary but I'm sure you could use some of my strategies if they help. I had a particularly lively class of year 10's and at the start of a new project (design) I decided things had to change, we even changed rooms which I'm aware will probably not be a choice for you however I created a new seating plan (hopefully by now you'll know who works well together etc...) going as far as sticking name labels on their desks. After they had taken their seats I spoke to them about behaviour an the rules of our class room, I wrote the rules on a poster and had these visible at al times. I also explained the consequences of breaking these rules, I laminated an A3 sheet with our rules in the corner and room for students names, after a warning their name would go on the board, a second warning automatically gave them a short lunch time detention, failing to turn up for this would cause a school detention. After introducing this I made sure I reminded the class of the rules at the start of every lesson and through questioning made sure they all knew them off by heart. Now just the sight of my laminated board will calm them down and I'v had some great results!! I just think go in, mean business and under no circumstances do not fail to follow through on threats and consequences! Hope you can use some of this.
     
  4. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Hiya,
    Thanks for the ideas. I'm actually already doing something similar in line with the schools behaviour policy - they get a warning, then their name goes on the board and they lose golden time. I don't think the losing golden time works though, but I don't want to take minutes off their lunch / play because it means I will end up losing practically every break I get!! Any other ideas?
     
  5. Sillow

    Sillow Senior commenter

    I gave my Year 4s a bit of a shock when, after they were terribly behaved for a supply, we spent a whole day working in silence. I just printed off a load of different sheets, on a variety of subjects, and they worked through those. I was strict about no-one talking and enforced it by keeping them in a break and lunch time (just one day and so worth it!).
    Yes, I didn't get any teaching done and they probably didn't learn much, but it was only a day and, after that, they settled down quite a bit. I think they realised what school could be like if they didn't behave and decided they didn't like it very much.
     
  6. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    That's an interesting idea!!!!!!! Did you find that the kids adhered to it? Cause I know a lot of mine would just talk anyway or would giggle. Did you take the whole lunch off in one go or did you take minutes?

    Did you run it by SLT first?
     
  7. You need to make your expectations and routines very very clear and stick to them. Don't make empty threats and always follow everything through.
     
  8. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    I actually have done though, but the sanctions aren't strong enough - they miss golden time if they misbehave cause that's the schools behaviour policy. I give one warning and then straight away sanction them, but they put their name on the board, behave for about 10 mins and are then off again, I have the same group of boys who lose golden time like it's a chocolate bar being eaten!! Also they get sent to another class if they get spoken to more than twice, most of them go out, and then come back in, behave for like an hour and then forget it and off they go!!!!!! Nothing seems to impact them in the long term.
     
  9. Do these children get rewarded enough for their good behaviour? If they don't get enough positive attention when they are trying to gain it, then they will soon go back to gaining negative attention because it is very easily achieved.
     
  10. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Well yeah, i mean the rewards are pretty generous in my class. There's a whole class incentive of marbles in a jar, and the bar isn't too high to earn it. Individual rewards - if someone has a great lesson or does something kind or helps someone, or is just generally really great they get 5 mins free ict time, AND on top of that house points are on offer. Maybe I haven't given stuff away as easily as I could for some of the kids who aren't so well behaved but it's really difficult to find things to reward for them sometimes!!!
     
  11. Sometimes you have to find those things though. If your expectations of them are negative then they will fill that mould. The children want attention and if the easiest way for them to get it is by misbehaving then they will stick with that. I had a girl in my class who literally drove me nuts and no amount of sanctions changed a thing. However, it was pointed out to me that I rarely rewarded her, or even said as many positive things to her as I did to the rest of the class. It took time and effort, but by ensuring I made my approach to her so much more positive and finding things to reward she eventually changed her behaviour in class. It was hard work and involved a lot of patience but it was worth it!
    Most of the time it doesn't need a big system of points or marbles or free time, but instead a positive comment and maybe even a sticker!
    By the way, I don't mean to imply that you aren't doing all these things already, but is just something to consider and reflect on what you are doing. I thought my behaviour management was spot on and this certain child was just a pain, but a lot of the fault was with me.
     
  12. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    That's cool, I know exactly where you're coming from and I think sometimes I probably don't praise certain children as much as I should. But what do you pick up on? Just sitting quietly for 10 seconds? I mean how low do you set the boundary?
     
  13. Most of the time it is not necessarily a certain thing for praise and reward. For example I will walk past and read a bit of her writing and say something like 'ooh I really like the word you have used there etc'. Basically a lot of the things I was always saying to my 'always well behaved' children as par for the course, but never really said to her.
     
  14. Sillow

    Sillow Senior commenter

    It's was a member of SLT's idea! The kids definitely stuck with it, because I was patrolling most of the time, giving them lost break/lunch minutes without any warnings. They soon cottoned on!
    It was actually a really horrible day for all of us but, like I said, they've been better since. And I have a couple of different positive behaviour schemes which they like.
    I've read with interest what PFF says, that sometimes the fault is our own. I'm going to try and think more about how much simple praise I give out and see if that works on the more persistant offenders for these last 6 weeks.
     
  15. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Yeah I think that i'm gonna try and be positive starting tomorrow and praise to the max for some of the kids who i perhaps forget to praise sometimes. See if that helps. The problem is though, the behaviour isn't really obvious attention seeking behaviour like rolling about on the floor, or being obviously naughty, it's little annoyances like chatting on the carpet, or having a pile up in the middle of the carpet at the start of the day / after lunch and bickering with eachother.
     
  16. If mine chat on the carpet they get moved. If they chat to the person they have been moved next to they have to stand up at the back of the carpet area on their own.
     
  17. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Yeah I usually do move them or make them stand up. Not a bad idea to send them to the back though. I have this one kid who sits in the front row because he's got learning difficulties, but part of the difficulty is a total inability to not turn around and talk to the person behind, what should I do with him? I wondered about putting him at the back but because of his issues i worry that he'll switch off (Im on my own most of the time) or will be at the back interfering with people. It doesn't seem to matter where i put him as he'll always find someone to turn to talk to. it drives me nuts, i'm in mid teach and all i can see is the back of his head.
     
  18. If the carpet area is the problem - could you look at whether you could do without one for a little while?
    If you do wish to keep it, you could turn it around to have positive rewards like 'Let's see which table walks and sits down the best' or maybe, give them house points/marbles etc. for the best 3 sitters that day. Another thing to think about is- have you actually explicitly said the type of behaviour you expect on the carpet? I was thinking the other day how my class have become noisy recently, but I haven't actually said to them 'This is the noise level I expect' and rarely mention it other than to say things like 'It's getting too noisy etc.'
     
  19. I know it can be hard work and very stressful to give up breaks and lunches to give out detentions but it can also work. I work at secondary school but, as much as I don't like to, I will give out break and lunch detentions even if its only to have the pupils sit in silence at the back of the class while I get on with things. I even get them to jobs I would have had to do, take things to the recycling bin, tidy up shelves of books, sort folders etc (So in a way detnetions can save me time - how ironic)
    For the vast majority of pupils they get the message and I rarely have to give up my breaks and lunches now to those pupils I teach, only ones who haven't met me before and think they can get away with misbehaving during a cover lesson.
    I always say something along the lines of 'dont know about you but I have better things to do at break and lunch ...' They get it quick enough. -x-

     
  20. I have children in my class who fall over each other to do jobs for me....so that would be their dream 'punshiment'!
    For my year 2 class, just 5 minutes of playtime missed is torture for them because it seems so long.
     

Share This Page