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Getting a 'good' or 'outstanding' when teaching a lower ability maths set.

Discussion in 'Primary' started by plumhues, Dec 12, 2011.

  1. Hello all,
    I'm looking for some advice on how to achieve a 'good' or 'outstanding' grade when teaching a lower ability maths set in a primary classroom. And yes, I know it's all a checklist and not very important in real life etc etc, but it is important for my school, and I want to do what I can to help my school succeed in 'their' eyes.
    I have taught lower ability sets in my rather tricky school for many years, in years 3, 5 and 6 and the children have always made good progress (give or take the odd one...). However, when I've been observed, my LA maths lessons have come out as satisfactory. And it's the reasons that are confusing me, and I could do with some advice on. The first time, the observers said that the children were not meeting age-expected levels, so it could be no more than satisfactory. So I played the game and adjusted it for my next observation, by choosing something I knew the pupils could do to age-expected levels (polygons) and teaching to those levels. That time I was told that I was aiming above their station, as they could see from their books that the children were at a lower level, so I should have differentiated better.

    So there's the dilemma...how do I satisfy both camps? Does anyone out there have any tips or guidance, especially if it's based around the new Ofsted framework.

    Many thanks x
     
  2. Hello all,
    I'm looking for some advice on how to achieve a 'good' or 'outstanding' grade when teaching a lower ability maths set in a primary classroom. And yes, I know it's all a checklist and not very important in real life etc etc, but it is important for my school, and I want to do what I can to help my school succeed in 'their' eyes.
    I have taught lower ability sets in my rather tricky school for many years, in years 3, 5 and 6 and the children have always made good progress (give or take the odd one...). However, when I've been observed, my LA maths lessons have come out as satisfactory. And it's the reasons that are confusing me, and I could do with some advice on. The first time, the observers said that the children were not meeting age-expected levels, so it could be no more than satisfactory. So I played the game and adjusted it for my next observation, by choosing something I knew the pupils could do to age-expected levels (polygons) and teaching to those levels. That time I was told that I was aiming above their station, as they could see from their books that the children were at a lower level, so I should have differentiated better.

    So there's the dilemma...how do I satisfy both camps? Does anyone out there have any tips or guidance, especially if it's based around the new Ofsted framework.

    Many thanks x
     
  3. New framework is all about progress, have clear evidence in your paperwork re the level those children arrived in your class. Its not the snapshot lesson anymore they will be looking at books talking to children they are very focused on PROGRESS if you can show that you are in strongest position- i know its hard but think you will be able to show good
     

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