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German teacher fined for painting over swastikas near a primary school

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Weald56, Nov 26, 2015.

  1. Weald56

    Weald56 Established commenter

  2. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    How bizarre... wonder what the logic of the German authorities was for this... does seem to go against 'logic'?

    Maybe his repainting made the signs unusable and they would have to be replaced? Still, does smack of stupid... [based on the information in the story]
     
  3. FairyHoneyPeaches

    FairyHoneyPeaches Occasional commenter

    Not very multiculturally tolerant of him though, given that the swastika is a symbol used throughout the world by many cultures.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    The Nazi swastika rotates the other way to those ones...

    [​IMG]

    http://www.wisegeek.com/is-it-really-illegal-to-display-the-swastika-symbol-in-germany.htm

    The answer to this question largely depends on the intended use of the swastika symbol. As a matter of public law, the post-war German law codes prohibit the display of a swastika in any form or fashion, even if used satirically or as part of an anti-Nazi political statement. This law is generally applied to the specific five-by-five grid swastika design used during the Nazi era, however. Several religious organizations have petitioned the German government for permission to display other forms of the symbol.
     
  5. Orkrider2

    Orkrider2 Star commenter

    Maybe it was supposed to send a definite message that the public should not take it upon themselves to act on behalf of the council? I don't agree with the idea that he should be punished for trying to put something right, but I can see how some might argue that it sets a dangerous precedent to let members of the public start fixing stuff or repainting stuff as they feel necessary rather than let the council make sure the work is being carried out safely and properly. It might encourage people not to report stuff like this too, and simply paint over it, meaning that it's more difficult to prosecute those that committed the offence in the first place. It could be seen as interfering with evidence of a crime perhaps?
    Not trying to justify what they're doing and some kind of token fine of like 10E (haven't got the euro symbol on this stupid american keyboard!) or something could have been sufficient to get the message across without actually punishing someone who was acting with honourable intentions.
     
  6. FairyHoneyPeaches

    FairyHoneyPeaches Occasional commenter

    Not to these

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    lanokia likes this.
  7. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    No that has the four dots on.
     
  8. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    Actually to be fair I might have over-simplified things.

    http://www.religionfacts.com/swastika/buddhism

    In Hinduism, the right-hand (clockwise) swastika is a symbol of the sun and the god Vishnu, while the left-hand (counterclockwise) swastika represents Kali and magic. The Buddhist swastika is almost always clockwise, while the swastika adopted by the Nazis (many of whom had occult interests) is counterclockwise.

    So the Nazi swastika could be confused with the Hindu swastika for Kali and magic. Interestingly Kali is associated with destruction so... still kind of fits.
     
  9. Weald56

    Weald56 Established commenter


    It does say in the article that he acted:

    when authorities failed to act despite being informed of the offensive symbols.

    despite the fact that:

    The swastika, a still-potent symbol of the Nazi regime responsible for the deaths of millions, is banned in all forms within Germany under the country’s criminal code.


     
  10. Orkrider2

    Orkrider2 Star commenter

    I know. I read all that. It doesn't negate anything I said though.

    It seems that the council weren't actually prosecuting him for covering the graffiti, but for ruining the signs by spray painting over them in black paint. They suggested that he could have stuck something over the top of the graffiti rather than covered the whole sign permanently.
     
  11. jamiedoorknob

    jamiedoorknob Occasional commenter

    He's been targetted by neo Nazis.

    They are mainly in eastern Germany, which is where he lives.
     
  12. jamiedoorknob

    jamiedoorknob Occasional commenter

    The punishment seems to be for the costs of cleaning up his black paint.
    http://www.thelocal.de/20151125/teacher-ordered-to-pay-fine-for-covering-swastikas

    On Tuesday the state court has upheld the town’s demand. While the judges said they did not have a problem with his action itself, the case was to do with the cost of cleaning up the damage, which he could have avoided if he had exactly covered the swastika with a sticker.

    “It‘s a joke,” the teacher told the Süddeustche Zeitung, adding that “it was totally unimaginable to him” that one could have put a sticker over a symbol that was twenty centimetres high and 20 centimetres wide.
     
  13. jamiedoorknob

    jamiedoorknob Occasional commenter

    Having looked it up on a map he doesn't live in the east but with such a high profile case it looks as if they've threatened him.
     
  14. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    So the bloke who sold me a 1936 Munich Olympics card album with a swastika on the cover at a German flea market was taking a bit of a risk then. The only bronze Hitler bust I saw there was facing backwards.

    They still display it in museums if it's relevant.

    Rudyard Kipling used to display the Hindi swastika on his books and other publications until the early 1930s when the Nazis gained power in Germany, then he quietly let it drop. It's a good way of dating his later stuff.
     
  15. jamiedoorknob

    jamiedoorknob Occasional commenter

    I don't think so, its only if you "display" it in support of neo Nazis.
     
  16. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    Not entirely sure... I googled it... not really an expert on German law and it's implementation.

    If I was I suspect I'd be a fair whack richer...

    I shall comfort myself by posting sarky comments on 'Get into Teachings' FB page.
     

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