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gender P.E teachers

Discussion in 'Physical education' started by tguarda, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. Hello,
    I am a Portuguese P.E teacher and doing a research about multicultural/etnics in schools aspects, and my question is, why in England they divide the class into girls group and boys group during the P.E lessons? and why a female P.E teacher for the girls and male P.E teacher for the boys?
    Can you tell me, where can I collect this information? or if you know the reasons...... Here in my country we have mix classes and either female or male P.E teacher can take the class. there are no separations!!!
    Thank you so much for your time, It will be so great if you could help me, please!!!
    Sincerely yours,
    Lina Guarda
     
  2. Hello,
    I am a Portuguese P.E teacher and doing a research about multicultural/etnics in schools aspects, and my question is, why in England they divide the class into girls group and boys group during the P.E lessons? and why a female P.E teacher for the girls and male P.E teacher for the boys?
    Can you tell me, where can I collect this information? or if you know the reasons...... Here in my country we have mix classes and either female or male P.E teacher can take the class. there are no separations!!!
    Thank you so much for your time, It will be so great if you could help me, please!!!
    Sincerely yours,
    Lina Guarda
     
  3. momentofclarity

    momentofclarity New commenter

    I was trained in Canada so this definitely colours my opinion, but from my time in the UK and working overseas with UK trained teachers it seems there remains the very archaic view that there are "boys" games and "girls" games and they should never cross.


    The arguments, particularly at secondary age, all tend to revolve around the old beliefs that girls can't compete with boys, boys won't behave when placed with girls, girls won't engage when placed with boys, or the classic safety excuse.


    While I worked in the UK I became an HOD and was able to shift from a traditional model of single sex to a model of mixed classes set on ability. The results were exactly what I expected, higher engagement from all students, increased enrollment in GCSE and A-Level courses and more interest in school clubs and teachers getting much better because they are able to develop skills and strategies appropriate for both genders (shocking!). I think the ultimate reason the system is what it is because it has always been what it is and nobody within the system has any other experience.


    Sounds like a very interesting study, would be curious to read other perceptions.
     

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