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gcse revision guides

Discussion in 'English' started by cheerysocks, Dec 4, 2007.

  1. cheerysocks

    cheerysocks New commenter

    both bought-in and ones developed inside a department:

    Perhaps this thread could be a place for recommneding ones that work well and sharing resources / exemplars?

    I'll kick off: (aqa a) Lonsdale (really useful and practical we find)

    The stuff below was the basis of our latest effort at a gcse booklet which we emailed to kids- have sadly delted the actual updated copy hence my mind lingering on this topic- sadly i have no idea how to highlight it in this forum to show page breaks etc









    1. Introduction
    2. General Advice
    3. The Exams
    4. Reading Non-fiction Texts
    5. Writing to argue, persuade or instruct
    6. Writing to inform, explain or describe
    7. Poems from other Cultures
    8. Carol Ann Duffy, Simon Armitage and Pre 1914 poems
    9. ?Of Mice and Men?
    10. Reading Exam Questions
    11. Revision Timetable
    12. Quick Tests


    Well, the time has come to sit those dreaded GCSE exams but, don?t despair, this guide is here to help you revise so you can achieve every success in the summer examinations.
    It is not a substitute for two years work or for a comprehensive revision schedule but it should help to point you in the right direction and erase any of your pre exam nerves.

    So Good Luck! ? and read on??


    Firstly you will need to evaluate how you work under exam conditions.
    Do you?.
    ? Read the questions carefully?
    ? Spend an appropriate amount of time on each question?
    ? Plan appropriately?
    ? Need to improve the way you write under exam conditions?
    ? Have a full understanding of the exam requirements?
    ? Have a full and comprehensive understanding of the poems and texts on which you will be questioned?
    ? Understand the writing triplets?

    Let?s tackle each aspect individually





    Exam Questions
    Each exam is given a set time limit in which it should be completed and this is no accident. Examiners are not trying to catch you out! They have timed the exam and understand the amount of time students need to complete all questions to a suitable standard.
    We all panic in exams and spend too little or too much time on specific questions so the trick is to look at how many marks are awarded for each question. A question work 1- 5 marks should only take between five to ten minutes, whereas a question with the potential mark of 15 should take at least twenty minutes.

    Planning
    Planning is the best way to ensure you write a successful answer and therefore is a skill which much be practised.
    The type of planning you prefer may take one of the following forms:
    Flow chart Mind map Spider diagram
    Paragraph plan Point plan
    It is worthwhile ensuring that you are comfortable using one or more of these methods and can quickly create a plan which should;
    ? Tackle the question
    ? Include the main points to be used and highlight the order
    ? Include key phrases, quotations, vocabulary, key words
    ? Strong conclusion

    Writing
    Ensuring that you are able to write in a confident and fluent manner, which can successfully tackle any form of question or activity, is crucial.
    It is therefore useful to practise writing parts of answers or whole answers either to be marked, or for you own sake, so that you can continue to revisit the work and look at areas for improvement.
    So you can achieve writing success make sure you revise the following:
    VCOP Technical language ? i.e. poetic terms Grammar
    Sentence structure and paragraphing

    Exam Requirements
    Please see the exam section of this booklet

    Understanding the Texts
    You will need to ensure you have a full and comprehensive
    understanding of the Anthology (and the novel, if you are not doing the
    short stories). This means reading
    texts, ensuring all texts are annotated and notes are taken on key
    themes, characters, devices and techniques. You should also have
    completed a number of practice questions on each text so are able to
    illustrate that knowledge and understanding, under exam conditions.


    The Language exam is divided into two papers. These are:
    ? Paper 1
    ? Paper 2
    In Paper 1 you will be asked to:
    ? Read and write about at least two non-fiction unseen texts. These will usually include information leaflets, advertisements or newspaper articles etc.
    ? You will then be asked to produce a piece of writing, which will be related to the texts from Section A and will ask you to write to argue, persuade or instruct.
    In Paper 2 you will be asked to:
    ? Write about poems from other cultures and traditions
    ? You will then be asked to produce a piece of writing which involves informing, explaining or describing an event, act or issue

    In the English Literature Paper you will be asked to:
    ? Write about a group of poems you have studied (Carol Ann Duffy, Simon Armitage and Pre 1914 poems)
    ? Write about the novel or short stories you have studied

    All of the exams will give you the opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge, understanding and appreciation of literary works and language conventions. Additionally, they will allow you the opportunity to demonstrate your own creative and technical flair for both writing and reading.

    ?It is your opportunity to make the examiner sit up and take notice?













    What the examiners are looking for?.
    ? Can you read a variety of texts thoughtfully and critically?
    ? Can you analyse different texts and extract and interpret aspects of the texts?
    ? Can you tell the difference between fact and fiction and comment on their use and effect?
    ? Can you show understanding of layout?
    ? Can you follow an argument and comment on key factors of that argument?
    ? Can you understand how texts are structured and presented to create particular effects?

    The paper mainly tests your reading ability so, firstly, you should read the questions so you know what ideas, features and information you are required to extract, then you should take the time to read the texts carefully.
    Your first reading of the text should be detailed and it is useful if you use a pen to highlight key areas or make notes.
    On your second reading you should then start forming and planning your answers to the questions, double-checking yourself each time before you have completed the section of the paper.
    Ensure throughout the answering process that you refer back to the text to find information and examples to support your answers or verify your interpretation (remember to use the PEE system).

    Finally ensure that you leave yourself five minutes at the end of the exam to go back through the paper, re-reading your answers and correcting any relevant areas.

    Comparing texts
    As you will be asked on this paper to compare two or more texts, make sure you analyse each text in terms of:
    ? What the writers are trying to do
    ? How the texts are aimed at particular readers
    ? How language is used
    ? How the texts are presented
    ? How the texts are structured
    ? The writer?s tone
    ? The success of the texts
    ? Your personal response to the text


    In Section B of English Paper 1, you will be asked to produce a piece of work on one of three possible tasks. These tasks will involve the following forms of writing:

    Arguing
    This means expressing a point of view as clearly and effectively as possible, using supporting evidence.

    Persuading
    This involves getting your readers to agree with your point of view or making them feel something and will usually involve trying to change people?s views.

    Instructing?
    Means explaining how to do something as clearly as possible.

    What the examiners are looking for?.
    ? You can communicate clearly
    ? You can write for a particular audience
    ? You can use appropriate forms of language correctly
    ? You can use a full range of vocabulary
    ? You can use VCOP
    ? You use standard English appropriately
    ? Your handwriting is clear and legible
    ? You understand and can use the appropriate openers

    Vocabulary
    Arguing Persuading Instructing
    Firstly
    Alternatively
    Despite this
    On the other hand
    It would seem
    Consequently
    Equally
    Similarly
    For example
    On the whole
    Furthermore
    Naturally
    Nevertheless
    In conclusion You should
    I, You
    Some people think
    In my experience
    It is important
    On balance
    Even though
    Despite this
    You will need
    Before you start
    First of all
    Your should
    Firstly
    Secondly
    Next
    Immediately
    Meanwhile
    Eventually
    When you have
    It is important to
    It is essential to
    More important
    Remember
    Take care that


    In section B of Paper 2, you will have to produce a piece of writing from a choice of three tasks. This will involve informing, explaining or describing or a mixture of these forms of writing.

    Informing
    This means writing information for your reader in a clear and concise manner

    Explaining
    This means helping your readers to understand an idea, issue or point of view

    Describing
    This means describing something in an imaginative or creative manner

    What are the examiners looking for?.
    ? That you can communicate clearly in writing
    ? That you can write for a particular audience
    ? That you can use a wide variety of vocabulary, punctuation and structures
    ? That you can use Standard English appropriately
    ? That your handwriting and presentation is clear and legible

    Tackling the paper
    You need to ensure for this section of the exam that you can:
    ? Read the paper, extracting and interpreting all information successfully
    ? Plan effectively
    ? Write using a range of grammar, technical language and extensive vocabulary
    ? Present your work appropriately
    ? Proof read








    In this Section A of the English Paper 2, you will need to write about a group of poems you have studied.

    What the examiners are looking for?

    ? Do you know the poems well?
    ? Do you understand how the writers have used language to create effects, and can you refer to particular examples?
    ? Can you explain what the poems are about?
    ? Can you compare the poems?
    ? Can you make a personal response to the poems?
    ? Can you show some understanding of the social, cultural and historical context of the poems?

    In the exam you will asked to compare two or more poems. In order to do this you must have a sound knowledge of a number of poems from both clusters. So that you can achieve success in the exam, you must ensure that your anthologies are fully annotated and that you have linked the poems under the key theme headings.
    Key Themes
    ? Culture
    ? Tradition
    ? Language
    ? Structure
    ? Religion
    ? Oppression

    You must: read through and annotate the poems, paying particular attention to:
    ? Metaphors
    ? Similes
    ? Personification
    ? Assonance
    ? Onomatopoeia
    ? Other poetic techniques
    ? Structure
    ? Rhyming scheme






    In the Literature exam, you will also be asked to compare three or more poems, one of which must be by Carol Ann Duffy, one by Simon Armitage and one from the pre 1914 cluster. This sounds difficult but, so long as you have revised your poems, can consider them in terms of key themes, and plan your answers accordingly, you should have no problems.

    Firstly, in terms of the key themes, these are:
    ? Love ? Anne Hathaway, Sonnet 130, Mother any distance
    ? Death ? Salome, The Hitcher, Tichborne?s Elergy, The Laboratory
    ? Parent/ child relationships ? On my first Sonne, We Remember your ?.
    ? Danger ? Education for Leisure, The Laboratory, Stealing
    ? Attitudes towards other people- Stealing, Hitcher, Anne Hathaway
    ? Memory ? Ulysses, Homecoming, Before you were mine
    ? Evil ?My Last Duchess, Salome, Havisham, The Hitcher
    ? Getting older ? Before you were mine, My father thought it? November
    ? Strong emotions ?Havisham, Tichborne?s Elergy, Kid
    ? Use of the first person ? Stealing, My father thought it?, The man he..
    ? Characters- Ulysses, The Village Schoolmaster, Salome
    ? Imagery ? Anne Hathaway, Ulysses, Before you were mine,
    ? Closing couplets ?Sonnet 130, November, Salome
    ? Irony ? My Last Duchess, Salome, Kid
    ? Language effects ?Sonnet 130, Salome, The Eagle
    ? Mood ? Havisham, The Affliction of Margaret, Homecoming

    How to tackle an essay question
    ? Step one- write about the theme in the introduction
    ? Compare the structure of each poem
    ? Compare the use of language in the poems
    ? Compare the feelings and attitudes in the poems
    ? Give a personal response to the poems in the conclusion

    Now attempt a few of the practice questions at the end of this booklet
    But remember to include the following:
    ? Poetic terms
    ? Structural devices
    Key poems
    Duffy Armitage Pre-1914
    Stealing Salome My father thought it The man he killed
    Education for Leisure November My last Duchess
    Havisham The Hitcher Sonnet 130
    Before you were mine Kid On my First Sonne





    The 8 short stories are a gift in the exam. You won?t have time to read them all the way through, so it is best to know four of them really well. You need to know them well enough to be able to flick to the right pages easily.

    The questions are typically on the themes of growing up, conflict between generations and family relationships. However, sometimes the questions are about the way the stories are told. You always have to compare stories. They might tell you which ones, or ask you to look at one named story and one of your choice.

    Sample questions include:
    ? Compare how the writer?s of Growing Up and Snowdrops show the relationships between adults and children.
    ? Compare how you respond to the ending of Flight with your response to the ending of one other story.
    ? Compare Snowdrops and one other story in the selection. Compare how the writers use detail in the openings of their stories to prepare the reader for what comes later.

    Do you need to quote a lot? As ever, it is a good idea to P.E.E. Most of your points though, will be constructing the character?s reactions or situations either in the same story or across the stories which can make it more difficult. Keep quotes short ? make them count!



















    Here are some exam questions which should provide you with hours of fun and a good indication of the type of questions you will be facing in the exam.

    Poetry from other cultures
    Compare how culture is viewed by two poets from either cluster

    Compare how structure is used to great effect in two Poems from Other Cultures

    Compare the way oppression is dealt with by two of the poets in Cluster One

    Duffy, Armitage and Pre 1914
    Compare how death is presented in Hitcher and one poem by Carol Ann Duffy

    Compare how imagery is used to create vivid descriptions in Anne Hathaway and one poem by Simon Armitage. Then go on to compare the ways imagery is used in two of the poems from the Pre 1914 bank

    Compare the ways parent/ child relationships are presented in Before you were mine and three other poems, one by Simon Armitage and any two from the Pre 1914 bank.

    Writing to Argue, Persuade or Instruct
    Write an article for a teenage magazine in which you argue either for blood sports to be made illegal or for blood sports to remain legal

    A friend has been invited to take part in a hunt. S/he is not sure what to do. Write a letter trying to persuade him/ her either to take part or refuse, depending on your view.

    A group of friends are getting together to organise a peaceful protest against a fox hunt. Write detailed instructions on how best to do this.

    Writing to Inform, Explain or Describe
    Your school asks you to help with its exchange programme with its French partner school. You are asked to write a short introduction to your school for the French students in the form of a letter informing them of important facts which they will find helpful on their visit.

    Write about a place that is important to you ? it could be real or imaginary. Explain what the place is like and why it is important to you.

    Describe a person you know well.




    Time
    3-4pm 4-5pm 5-6pm 6-7pm 7-8pm
    Monday


    Tuesday


    Wednesday


    Thursday


    Friday



    Time

    Saturday


    Sunday



















    Do you understand the meaning of the following terms?
    Accent
    Adjective
    Adverb
    Allegory
    Alliteration
    Assertion
    Assonance
    Audience
    Colloquialism
    Couplet
    Dialect
    Diction
    Emotive language
    Fable
    Fact
    Genre
    Iambic pentameter
    Imagery
    Metaphor
    Metre
    Mood
    Narrative
    Noun
    Onomatopoeia
    Opinion
    Pace
    Personification
    Persuasive language
    Pronoun
    Puns
    Received Pronunciation
    Register
    Rhetorical questions
    Rhythm
    Simile
    Slang
    Sonnet
    Standard English
    Stanza
    Stereotypes
    Syllable
    Theme
    Can you use them effectively in your written work?






     
  2. cheerysocks

    cheerysocks New commenter

    both bought-in and ones developed inside a department:

    Perhaps this thread could be a place for recommneding ones that work well and sharing resources / exemplars?

    I'll kick off: (aqa a) Lonsdale (really useful and practical we find)

    The stuff below was the basis of our latest effort at a gcse booklet which we emailed to kids- have sadly delted the actual updated copy hence my mind lingering on this topic- sadly i have no idea how to highlight it in this forum to show page breaks etc









    1. Introduction
    2. General Advice
    3. The Exams
    4. Reading Non-fiction Texts
    5. Writing to argue, persuade or instruct
    6. Writing to inform, explain or describe
    7. Poems from other Cultures
    8. Carol Ann Duffy, Simon Armitage and Pre 1914 poems
    9. ?Of Mice and Men?
    10. Reading Exam Questions
    11. Revision Timetable
    12. Quick Tests


    Well, the time has come to sit those dreaded GCSE exams but, don?t despair, this guide is here to help you revise so you can achieve every success in the summer examinations.
    It is not a substitute for two years work or for a comprehensive revision schedule but it should help to point you in the right direction and erase any of your pre exam nerves.

    So Good Luck! ? and read on??


    Firstly you will need to evaluate how you work under exam conditions.
    Do you?.
    ? Read the questions carefully?
    ? Spend an appropriate amount of time on each question?
    ? Plan appropriately?
    ? Need to improve the way you write under exam conditions?
    ? Have a full understanding of the exam requirements?
    ? Have a full and comprehensive understanding of the poems and texts on which you will be questioned?
    ? Understand the writing triplets?

    Let?s tackle each aspect individually





    Exam Questions
    Each exam is given a set time limit in which it should be completed and this is no accident. Examiners are not trying to catch you out! They have timed the exam and understand the amount of time students need to complete all questions to a suitable standard.
    We all panic in exams and spend too little or too much time on specific questions so the trick is to look at how many marks are awarded for each question. A question work 1- 5 marks should only take between five to ten minutes, whereas a question with the potential mark of 15 should take at least twenty minutes.

    Planning
    Planning is the best way to ensure you write a successful answer and therefore is a skill which much be practised.
    The type of planning you prefer may take one of the following forms:
    Flow chart Mind map Spider diagram
    Paragraph plan Point plan
    It is worthwhile ensuring that you are comfortable using one or more of these methods and can quickly create a plan which should;
    ? Tackle the question
    ? Include the main points to be used and highlight the order
    ? Include key phrases, quotations, vocabulary, key words
    ? Strong conclusion

    Writing
    Ensuring that you are able to write in a confident and fluent manner, which can successfully tackle any form of question or activity, is crucial.
    It is therefore useful to practise writing parts of answers or whole answers either to be marked, or for you own sake, so that you can continue to revisit the work and look at areas for improvement.
    So you can achieve writing success make sure you revise the following:
    VCOP Technical language ? i.e. poetic terms Grammar
    Sentence structure and paragraphing

    Exam Requirements
    Please see the exam section of this booklet

    Understanding the Texts
    You will need to ensure you have a full and comprehensive
    understanding of the Anthology (and the novel, if you are not doing the
    short stories). This means reading
    texts, ensuring all texts are annotated and notes are taken on key
    themes, characters, devices and techniques. You should also have
    completed a number of practice questions on each text so are able to
    illustrate that knowledge and understanding, under exam conditions.


    The Language exam is divided into two papers. These are:
    ? Paper 1
    ? Paper 2
    In Paper 1 you will be asked to:
    ? Read and write about at least two non-fiction unseen texts. These will usually include information leaflets, advertisements or newspaper articles etc.
    ? You will then be asked to produce a piece of writing, which will be related to the texts from Section A and will ask you to write to argue, persuade or instruct.
    In Paper 2 you will be asked to:
    ? Write about poems from other cultures and traditions
    ? You will then be asked to produce a piece of writing which involves informing, explaining or describing an event, act or issue

    In the English Literature Paper you will be asked to:
    ? Write about a group of poems you have studied (Carol Ann Duffy, Simon Armitage and Pre 1914 poems)
    ? Write about the novel or short stories you have studied

    All of the exams will give you the opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge, understanding and appreciation of literary works and language conventions. Additionally, they will allow you the opportunity to demonstrate your own creative and technical flair for both writing and reading.

    ?It is your opportunity to make the examiner sit up and take notice?













    What the examiners are looking for?.
    ? Can you read a variety of texts thoughtfully and critically?
    ? Can you analyse different texts and extract and interpret aspects of the texts?
    ? Can you tell the difference between fact and fiction and comment on their use and effect?
    ? Can you show understanding of layout?
    ? Can you follow an argument and comment on key factors of that argument?
    ? Can you understand how texts are structured and presented to create particular effects?

    The paper mainly tests your reading ability so, firstly, you should read the questions so you know what ideas, features and information you are required to extract, then you should take the time to read the texts carefully.
    Your first reading of the text should be detailed and it is useful if you use a pen to highlight key areas or make notes.
    On your second reading you should then start forming and planning your answers to the questions, double-checking yourself each time before you have completed the section of the paper.
    Ensure throughout the answering process that you refer back to the text to find information and examples to support your answers or verify your interpretation (remember to use the PEE system).

    Finally ensure that you leave yourself five minutes at the end of the exam to go back through the paper, re-reading your answers and correcting any relevant areas.

    Comparing texts
    As you will be asked on this paper to compare two or more texts, make sure you analyse each text in terms of:
    ? What the writers are trying to do
    ? How the texts are aimed at particular readers
    ? How language is used
    ? How the texts are presented
    ? How the texts are structured
    ? The writer?s tone
    ? The success of the texts
    ? Your personal response to the text


    In Section B of English Paper 1, you will be asked to produce a piece of work on one of three possible tasks. These tasks will involve the following forms of writing:

    Arguing
    This means expressing a point of view as clearly and effectively as possible, using supporting evidence.

    Persuading
    This involves getting your readers to agree with your point of view or making them feel something and will usually involve trying to change people?s views.

    Instructing?
    Means explaining how to do something as clearly as possible.

    What the examiners are looking for?.
    ? You can communicate clearly
    ? You can write for a particular audience
    ? You can use appropriate forms of language correctly
    ? You can use a full range of vocabulary
    ? You can use VCOP
    ? You use standard English appropriately
    ? Your handwriting is clear and legible
    ? You understand and can use the appropriate openers

    Vocabulary
    Arguing Persuading Instructing
    Firstly
    Alternatively
    Despite this
    On the other hand
    It would seem
    Consequently
    Equally
    Similarly
    For example
    On the whole
    Furthermore
    Naturally
    Nevertheless
    In conclusion You should
    I, You
    Some people think
    In my experience
    It is important
    On balance
    Even though
    Despite this
    You will need
    Before you start
    First of all
    Your should
    Firstly
    Secondly
    Next
    Immediately
    Meanwhile
    Eventually
    When you have
    It is important to
    It is essential to
    More important
    Remember
    Take care that


    In section B of Paper 2, you will have to produce a piece of writing from a choice of three tasks. This will involve informing, explaining or describing or a mixture of these forms of writing.

    Informing
    This means writing information for your reader in a clear and concise manner

    Explaining
    This means helping your readers to understand an idea, issue or point of view

    Describing
    This means describing something in an imaginative or creative manner

    What are the examiners looking for?.
    ? That you can communicate clearly in writing
    ? That you can write for a particular audience
    ? That you can use a wide variety of vocabulary, punctuation and structures
    ? That you can use Standard English appropriately
    ? That your handwriting and presentation is clear and legible

    Tackling the paper
    You need to ensure for this section of the exam that you can:
    ? Read the paper, extracting and interpreting all information successfully
    ? Plan effectively
    ? Write using a range of grammar, technical language and extensive vocabulary
    ? Present your work appropriately
    ? Proof read








    In this Section A of the English Paper 2, you will need to write about a group of poems you have studied.

    What the examiners are looking for?

    ? Do you know the poems well?
    ? Do you understand how the writers have used language to create effects, and can you refer to particular examples?
    ? Can you explain what the poems are about?
    ? Can you compare the poems?
    ? Can you make a personal response to the poems?
    ? Can you show some understanding of the social, cultural and historical context of the poems?

    In the exam you will asked to compare two or more poems. In order to do this you must have a sound knowledge of a number of poems from both clusters. So that you can achieve success in the exam, you must ensure that your anthologies are fully annotated and that you have linked the poems under the key theme headings.
    Key Themes
    ? Culture
    ? Tradition
    ? Language
    ? Structure
    ? Religion
    ? Oppression

    You must: read through and annotate the poems, paying particular attention to:
    ? Metaphors
    ? Similes
    ? Personification
    ? Assonance
    ? Onomatopoeia
    ? Other poetic techniques
    ? Structure
    ? Rhyming scheme






    In the Literature exam, you will also be asked to compare three or more poems, one of which must be by Carol Ann Duffy, one by Simon Armitage and one from the pre 1914 cluster. This sounds difficult but, so long as you have revised your poems, can consider them in terms of key themes, and plan your answers accordingly, you should have no problems.

    Firstly, in terms of the key themes, these are:
    ? Love ? Anne Hathaway, Sonnet 130, Mother any distance
    ? Death ? Salome, The Hitcher, Tichborne?s Elergy, The Laboratory
    ? Parent/ child relationships ? On my first Sonne, We Remember your ?.
    ? Danger ? Education for Leisure, The Laboratory, Stealing
    ? Attitudes towards other people- Stealing, Hitcher, Anne Hathaway
    ? Memory ? Ulysses, Homecoming, Before you were mine
    ? Evil ?My Last Duchess, Salome, Havisham, The Hitcher
    ? Getting older ? Before you were mine, My father thought it? November
    ? Strong emotions ?Havisham, Tichborne?s Elergy, Kid
    ? Use of the first person ? Stealing, My father thought it?, The man he..
    ? Characters- Ulysses, The Village Schoolmaster, Salome
    ? Imagery ? Anne Hathaway, Ulysses, Before you were mine,
    ? Closing couplets ?Sonnet 130, November, Salome
    ? Irony ? My Last Duchess, Salome, Kid
    ? Language effects ?Sonnet 130, Salome, The Eagle
    ? Mood ? Havisham, The Affliction of Margaret, Homecoming

    How to tackle an essay question
    ? Step one- write about the theme in the introduction
    ? Compare the structure of each poem
    ? Compare the use of language in the poems
    ? Compare the feelings and attitudes in the poems
    ? Give a personal response to the poems in the conclusion

    Now attempt a few of the practice questions at the end of this booklet
    But remember to include the following:
    ? Poetic terms
    ? Structural devices
    Key poems
    Duffy Armitage Pre-1914
    Stealing Salome My father thought it The man he killed
    Education for Leisure November My last Duchess
    Havisham The Hitcher Sonnet 130
    Before you were mine Kid On my First Sonne





    The 8 short stories are a gift in the exam. You won?t have time to read them all the way through, so it is best to know four of them really well. You need to know them well enough to be able to flick to the right pages easily.

    The questions are typically on the themes of growing up, conflict between generations and family relationships. However, sometimes the questions are about the way the stories are told. You always have to compare stories. They might tell you which ones, or ask you to look at one named story and one of your choice.

    Sample questions include:
    ? Compare how the writer?s of Growing Up and Snowdrops show the relationships between adults and children.
    ? Compare how you respond to the ending of Flight with your response to the ending of one other story.
    ? Compare Snowdrops and one other story in the selection. Compare how the writers use detail in the openings of their stories to prepare the reader for what comes later.

    Do you need to quote a lot? As ever, it is a good idea to P.E.E. Most of your points though, will be constructing the character?s reactions or situations either in the same story or across the stories which can make it more difficult. Keep quotes short ? make them count!



















    Here are some exam questions which should provide you with hours of fun and a good indication of the type of questions you will be facing in the exam.

    Poetry from other cultures
    Compare how culture is viewed by two poets from either cluster

    Compare how structure is used to great effect in two Poems from Other Cultures

    Compare the way oppression is dealt with by two of the poets in Cluster One

    Duffy, Armitage and Pre 1914
    Compare how death is presented in Hitcher and one poem by Carol Ann Duffy

    Compare how imagery is used to create vivid descriptions in Anne Hathaway and one poem by Simon Armitage. Then go on to compare the ways imagery is used in two of the poems from the Pre 1914 bank

    Compare the ways parent/ child relationships are presented in Before you were mine and three other poems, one by Simon Armitage and any two from the Pre 1914 bank.

    Writing to Argue, Persuade or Instruct
    Write an article for a teenage magazine in which you argue either for blood sports to be made illegal or for blood sports to remain legal

    A friend has been invited to take part in a hunt. S/he is not sure what to do. Write a letter trying to persuade him/ her either to take part or refuse, depending on your view.

    A group of friends are getting together to organise a peaceful protest against a fox hunt. Write detailed instructions on how best to do this.

    Writing to Inform, Explain or Describe
    Your school asks you to help with its exchange programme with its French partner school. You are asked to write a short introduction to your school for the French students in the form of a letter informing them of important facts which they will find helpful on their visit.

    Write about a place that is important to you ? it could be real or imaginary. Explain what the place is like and why it is important to you.

    Describe a person you know well.




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    Do you understand the meaning of the following terms?
    Accent
    Adjective
    Adverb
    Allegory
    Alliteration
    Assertion
    Assonance
    Audience
    Colloquialism
    Couplet
    Dialect
    Diction
    Emotive language
    Fable
    Fact
    Genre
    Iambic pentameter
    Imagery
    Metaphor
    Metre
    Mood
    Narrative
    Noun
    Onomatopoeia
    Opinion
    Pace
    Personification
    Persuasive language
    Pronoun
    Puns
    Received Pronunciation
    Register
    Rhetorical questions
    Rhythm
    Simile
    Slang
    Sonnet
    Standard English
    Stanza
    Stereotypes
    Syllable
    Theme
    Can you use them effectively in your written work?






     
  3. hey cheery socks,

    great stuff there, thanks for sharing.

    i've produced revision booklets on 'The Merchant of Venice' and the war poetry anthology ed. martin if either are any use?

    mail me at miffythesmartbunny@hotmail.com
     
  4. cheerysocks

    cheerysocks New commenter

    a quick bump
     
  5. Mail me, I've got a revision guide for POC. I'm looking at it again, as I'm not too keen on it, but have a look and I'll send you the new stuff when it is done.

    readingsez78@hotmail.co.uk
     
  6. cheerysocks

    cheerysocks New commenter

    i see there is a decent one on teachit too

    (note to self dont forget to look there too more often)
     
  7. You've got mail
     
  8. cheerysocks

    cheerysocks New commenter

    thanks- lots of food for thought there
     
  9. Would'nt mind a copy of the war poetry anthology revision if by any chance still available,thanksAlexsis

     
  10. A new English revision mag from Teachit is out for GCSE - see issue 1 free in digital glory here https://asp-gb.secure-zone.net/v2/index.jsp?id=795/998/2198&lng=en. Would love feedback
     

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