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GCSE - parental in-put

Discussion in 'Secondary' started by crumblebucket, Feb 6, 2011.

  1. Can anyone tell me what is an accepted level of parental in-put for pupils preparing for the controlled assessment part of GCSEs? I work in primary but my own children are approaching GCSE age. I have been surprised (to put it mildly) by the amount of help some friends are giving to their child in preparation for the controlled assessments (notably English). I thought the whole point of introducing them was to get over the problem of parents contributing too much to the coursework. Obviously both teachers and parents want the children to do well but it still seems the playing field is far from level. What percentage of the marks go on these assessments and are there still final exams where no advance preparation (other than the usual revision) is done?
    Thanks in advance for enlightening me!
     
  2. Can anyone tell me what is an accepted level of parental in-put for pupils preparing for the controlled assessment part of GCSEs? I work in primary but my own children are approaching GCSE age. I have been surprised (to put it mildly) by the amount of help some friends are giving to their child in preparation for the controlled assessments (notably English). I thought the whole point of introducing them was to get over the problem of parents contributing too much to the coursework. Obviously both teachers and parents want the children to do well but it still seems the playing field is far from level. What percentage of the marks go on these assessments and are there still final exams where no advance preparation (other than the usual revision) is done?
    Thanks in advance for enlightening me!
     
  3. How long is a piece of string? The answer will vary according to:
    Exam Board
    Subject
    Control Level (low/medium/high)
    It varies from being little different from old coursework (where parents found themselves able to 'help') to exam like conditions.
    As to % of final marks, that too can vary but cannot be more than 60% for a real GCSE.
    Preparation is just that. Like training. You can pretty much do what you like to help the thought process, but you 'shouldn't' do the work for them. But ... who is to know?
     
  4. AdmiralNelson

    AdmiralNelson New commenter

    The solution to the Coursework problem was to replace it with exams; the government fudged the issue. So now we have a very uneven playing field. Controlled Assessments will go the same way as Coursework in a few years time, IMHO...
     
  5. Thanks both for your replies. I guess it's up to one's conscience!
     
  6. erp77

    erp77 New commenter

    Maybe I'm just being a bit thick but how can parents help with controlled assessment?
    I thought the whole point was that the work was done in school in controlled conditions and not taken home!
     
  7. From what I understand erp77, the subject is given in advance and the research/preparation is done at home, the results to be reproduced under controlled conditions at school. But, as I say, I am not in secondary myself and my son does not start his GCSE course until next year (by which time it may have changed again anyway!)
     
  8. bettieblu

    bettieblu New commenter

    As an English teacher I can advise that your friends should not be 'helping' in the preperation of the English Controlled Assessments. They are all conducted under 'high levels' of monitoring and control - the plans (1 page of A4 handwritten by the student) should be completed in class from previous notes and work. The actual CA are then completed in silent exam conditions. None of the work will leave the room or the teachers control.The parents may be helping with prior study and/or understanding but be assured they should not be helping with the actual Controlled Assessment and its detailed planning at all.
     
  9. Like another poster(s) has said often the subject is known before hand and can be researched at home. Pupils will often now what they will have to do under the high level of control so there is nothing to stop them practising at home.
     
  10. my daughter did an english controlled assessment last week. they had planned in previous lessons, and written out an example. this was not allowed in the exam - which was done in the classroom in a normal lesson. My daughters friend did hers the same lesson (different set, differentteacher obviously). She was allowed her planning and pre written work during the controlled assessment, the teacher just collected everything in at the end. How unfair is that???? if its happening in her school you can bet your bottom dollar its happening in loads of schools!
     
  11. Morninglover

    Morninglover Lead commenter

    I can't say what happened at any other school (or indeed in any other subject), but in my school/subject we have been very careful about following the letter of the Exam board rules (and these vary significantly from subject to subject & exam board to exam board). For example our students are allowed to take 'notes' & a 'plan' prepared beforehand if they conform to the Board rules into the CA session - these are collected in later.
    Difficulties emerge when a pupil is absent for either the preparatory (supervised) session and/or the CA session - how does one provide a , give exactly the same controlled environment when the pupil has 10 or so other subjects (and the teacher a full timetable)?

    Incidentally in this case I'd be loath to accept that the rules were flouted so blatantly...if I believed everything I was told by my children or other pupils) I'd have got a very incorrect picture of school life over the years...
     

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