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GCSE Data

Discussion in 'Music' started by Nellypenell, May 8, 2012.

  1. Hi all,
    sorry for the boring title!! At our school, we teach GCSE music from year 9. We are being asked to grade pupils showing progression at least 5-6 times a year. So, if a pupil got a level 6 at end of KS3, then they are entering the KS4 course on a D as that is what our school sees a level 6 as.
    My main question is this:
    When you are asked to enter data, do you average all three perf, comp & Listening areas to get a whollistic view of a pupil? Do you lower a pupil actual grade by a full grade (A>B) if you feel you need to be strategic in demonstrating progress?
     
  2. Hi all,
    sorry for the boring title!! At our school, we teach GCSE music from year 9. We are being asked to grade pupils showing progression at least 5-6 times a year. So, if a pupil got a level 6 at end of KS3, then they are entering the KS4 course on a D as that is what our school sees a level 6 as.
    My main question is this:
    When you are asked to enter data, do you average all three perf, comp & Listening areas to get a whollistic view of a pupil? Do you lower a pupil actual grade by a full grade (A>B) if you feel you need to be strategic in demonstrating progress?
     
  3. . . . Or do you go to your management and suggest that they stop wasting yours and your colleagues precious professional time. I've never heard of anything so clearly designed to meet the needs of the school rather than the students. All that effort and does it really have any impact on student,s learning? I, for one, don't look on the Gcse course as something that produces smooth consistent progress.
     
  4. I agree with Rockmeamadeus, I've never heard of anything so ludicrous designed so SLT can number crunch. You can't measure progress at GCSE like that or not meaningfully anyway. I would be having words wih your line manager about assessment and impact on student learning and waving the latest ofsted music report under their noses. However to answer your initial question, I would go with if they were to get their GCSE mark tomorrow taking into account all performing, composing and listening and then inputting the mark. As for the strategic progress and lowering grades to show progress, normally I would say be honest as I don't agree with giving lower than deserved marks but in a situation like this it would probably be hard and it would depend on how much SLT are likely to be breathing down my neck.
     
  5. We also start the GCSE course in year 9. We however have to predict what the final grade will be rather than saying where a pupil is currently at when the data is collected. We collect data termly. A pupil who gets level 6 at the end of KS3 would be expected to get at least grade B for GCSE. This predicting of a final grade means that the data that is collected never says what standard the pupil is currently working at only what we expect them to get compared to their FFT generated target. Sorry that isn't really of any help to you.
     

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