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Games-based learning - what are your views?

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by gailrobinson, Jan 10, 2012.

  1. The profile of programming and coding skills is currently very high as we try to equip learners with the skills needed by employers. Games-based learning brings a whole new generation the motivation and opportunity to develop programming and coding effectively and we're starting to build a range of these resources for TES Resources. Can you help us build up the collection by sharing resources from Kodu, Alice and Scratch?
    Check out the fantatsic examples of playful learning providing interesting contexts and activities that will engage learners across the curriculum.
     
  2. The profile of programming and coding skills is currently very high as we try to equip learners with the skills needed by employers. Games-based learning brings a whole new generation the motivation and opportunity to develop programming and coding effectively and we're starting to build a range of these resources for TES Resources. Can you help us build up the collection by sharing resources from Kodu, Alice and Scratch?
    Check out the fantatsic examples of playful learning providing interesting contexts and activities that will engage learners across the curriculum.
     
  3. I've got a real fondness for these kinds of resources, so here's what I've shared so far. I'll try and upload more when I get the chance, but I hope some of these are handy.
    Design a Game Cover
    My take on designing game covers.
    http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Design-a-Game-Cover-6096787/

    Computer Game Rating
    Good for students to understand the games rating system.
    http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Computer-Game-Ratings-6087867/
    Scratch Resources
    Design A Spaceship and make it move
    This one takes students through their first steps in coding using video and it also includes a link to the full game, so they can see all the code.
    http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Design-a-Spaceship-and-make-it-move-6113167/
    Balance of Payments Game
    Good for teaching Economics and as an example of a Scratch Game. Again all the code is there to see.
    http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Balance-of-Payments-Game-6111136/

    Plot Spinner
    Great
    for Creative Writing to encourage students to get writing. Before the
    enrichment kids were moaning that they might have to write a 100 word
    essay, like in English. I assured them no word counts, but afterwards
    asked them how much they'd written in an hour 2 kids said 375 words and
    the rest had all written between 150-25 words a piece. And again all the
    code is there for students to tinker with.
    http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Plot-Spinner-8-very-common-plot-devices-6162715/
    Othe Types of Games
    Vanilla Flavoured Quiz
    In this resource the quiz code is given, but they have to design it to make it attractive. Students have a lot of fun designing questions and answers. Great for revision.
    http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Vanilla-flavoured-Quiz-6088048/
    Create your own Role-playing Cards
    This uses Excel to create Role Playing cards in the style of top trumps.
    http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Create-your-own-Role-playing-Cards-6122354/
    Money Board Game

    This one is for the design of a Paper based game.

    http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Money-Board-Game-6066697/
    Lego Olympics
    This was an absolute blast when we invited in the local primary schools to use Lego Robots to perform in the Lego Olympics, but could use any programmable robot or turtle.
    http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Lego-Olympics-6115118/

     
  4. Thanks James! Fabulous news! Thanks for sharing these great resources with everyone - professional generosity like this is what TES resources is all about..... resources by teachers, for teachers that can help learning experiences and break down barriers between classrooms and schools! [​IMG]
     
  5. It's definitely something that is on our radar! And I am SO looking forward to seeing your resources - let us know the links here when they go up please! [​IMG]
     
  6. More scratch included with a complete KS3! (and other stuff too) at
    http://www.gr82bgeeky.co.uk/



     
  7. clickschool

    clickschool New commenter

  8. JaquesJaquesLiverot

    JaquesJaquesLiverot Established commenter

    Can "games-based learning" mean two different things?
    I went to a presentation on "games-based learning" at an ICT conference, and it was nothing like what's been suggested here. The suggestions here seem to suggest creating games, which is something that could be done in ICT. The presentation I watched was about using games in primary and other subjects, and consisted mainly of new clothes for emperors (a bit like "web 2.0" a few years ago).
     
  9. Tosha

    Tosha New commenter

    Scratch is good stepping stone to programming. Kodu doesn't look as challenging. Has anyone any ideas for progression through these tools.

    I was thinking Scratch/kodu - gamemaker - python.

    Not used gamemaker tho can it be used to teach itteration and selection, as scratch can and Kodu doesn't
     
  10. I believe there are actually many different types of games-based learning - and, in fact, often talk to people about it as being 3M's of games based learning - games-MEDIATED learning (the use of games as a context for learning, which may include commercially available games for the wii/xbox etc as well as more "serious" games that have been designed with a learning objective in mind); games-MOTIVATING learning (the use of games as rewards or to engage learners or to make learning fun - which may include non-tech games just as much as tech games, eg bingo, hangman, etc); and games-MAKING (using programming/coding or pre-programming/pre-coding skills with learners who develop logical, problem solving approaches using e.g. kodu, scratch, stencylworks, ALICE, XNA, flash, etc). There's research being done into various areas by different people and I'm really looking forward to that informing effective classroom practice. I don't know about new clothes for emperors - like all tools, it depends VERY MUCH on how they are harnessed by educators for learning!
     
  11. JaquesJaquesLiverot

    JaquesJaquesLiverot Established commenter

    The presentation I saw was definitely about the first M - games-mediated learning. They were using some software to generate a medieval-type background as the context for story-telling.
    My reservations come from the fact that it didn't appear to be anything new, just a different way of doing it. The "dressing up" of the 2010s, if you like.
    I suppose that use of technology could be a motivating factor (the second M), but, on the other hand, you're changing the experience from one where you have to imagine the context into one where you just have to look at it, so there's presumably a lower cognitive load.
    I'm prepared to concede that I might be wrong - it'd be interesting to see the results of a long-term study into the impact of such technology on the overall development of students who use it.
     
  12. I know that drag and drop tool doesn't look like your traditional programming and coding - but actually, the skills that our students learn in the process of using games making tools with these tools are "pre-programming" - the logic skills, sequencing skills, the problem solving, storyboarding, clearly defining objectives and how to get there, trying it out to check if it works and refining and improving if it doesn't........... stickability in other words....... and these are the fundamental as a background for programming and coding.

    Besides, I am told that games programmers are increasingly using tools that look similar too - albeit increasingly complex!!
     
  13. I think kodu and scratch can be used at a multitude of keystages and it's more about how a teacher engages and directs the learners to develop higher level thinking skills when using them.... having said that, I would suggest Kodu as a starting point, then Scratch for increasingly complex work and being able to change variables..... then tools such as ALICE and Stencylworks which include opportunities for introducing the language of coding and programming are incredibly useful.... after that, it's onto tools like small basic/visual basic but I've just been introduced to Yousrc as an intermediate between these games-based tools and coding tools - anyone else got experience of it or any other ideas about how to progress through these tools?
     

  14. Thanks for this!
     
  15. Hello,
    When you say game based learning, this is the gamification of education and making it interactive to the pupil/student. If this is what you are looking for, then I think I might be able to help.
    I work with a company called Game to learn which has everything you might be interested in. The games we make are created with education and gamification in mind, where the child will like the game but be able to stay loyal to the game. These games are educational in the same time but only passively so the child doesn't suspect this is a education game full stop but actually is an interactive game. When a child smells full education in a game, the game just doesn't work as well as it could.
    We at Game to learn have done our research with schools around the country and we have got the same feedback again and again. Interactive Learning works and it's quite easy to understand why it does. In your classroom, ask next time who uses a computer, a console, a tablet, smart phone or anything which you can label under "interactive technology." You'll see alot of hands come up and that is what the children expect to use, something fun instead of the book and pencil. We're hardly going to go back to Nokia 3310 as our expections have risen and that's why Interactive Learning is the way to go (do not get me wrong, the book is amazing but it's time to move on.)
    Interactive learning works and gamifying the experience also works for children. Thou this is the case we make sure the games aren't too gamified so the students don't forget the reason to learn instead of mindlessly playing the game. There's a big balance to it which is needed and therefore, it's important to have good fun educational games but with a balance which keeps the children commited to the game and loyal to it.
    For more information go to the follow:
    Game to learn : Website : Facebook : Twitter

     
  16. cj3

    cj3

    In response to Jan Webb - what research do you know of which is concerned with the Game Making part of your post? I'm doing some research into this myself and would be interested to know what other research is going on - especially in the UK.
     

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