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Game making software

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by kindling_not_vessels, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. We currently use Scratch and nothing else. I'm going to introduce some game making to the curriculum next year so I've been considering the options - your thoughts would be very welcome as my conclusions are based on very limited research.
    The options I have considered so far are:
    1. Game maker. Plenty of teaching materials available so it must be popular. Not too sure about publishing options though. Have not tried yet so I don't know how transferable the skills learnt are.
    2. Stencyl. Looks excellent and free. Very Scratch like underbelly, but probably beyond my kids to go beyond adapting what others have already done - which ruins any potential buzz from creating something worthwhile and original. Potential to sell their games on App store could motivate some of the gifted and talented though.
    3. Gamestar mechanic. Free and online so there are no installation issues to worry about. Seems a bit simplistic from what little I have seen though and teaching resources are hard to find.
    4. Kodu. Free, simple and looks like good fun, so good for motivating disaffected pupils - but teaching resources are hard to find and there's much in the way of transferable skills.

     
  2. We currently use Scratch and nothing else. I'm going to introduce some game making to the curriculum next year so I've been considering the options - your thoughts would be very welcome as my conclusions are based on very limited research.
    The options I have considered so far are:
    1. Game maker. Plenty of teaching materials available so it must be popular. Not too sure about publishing options though. Have not tried yet so I don't know how transferable the skills learnt are.
    2. Stencyl. Looks excellent and free. Very Scratch like underbelly, but probably beyond my kids to go beyond adapting what others have already done - which ruins any potential buzz from creating something worthwhile and original. Potential to sell their games on App store could motivate some of the gifted and talented though.
    3. Gamestar mechanic. Free and online so there are no installation issues to worry about. Seems a bit simplistic from what little I have seen though and teaching resources are hard to find.
    4. Kodu. Free, simple and looks like good fun, so good for motivating disaffected pupils - but teaching resources are hard to find and there's much in the way of transferable skills.

     
  3. DEmsley

    DEmsley New commenter

    Which Year?
    You could look at GreenFoot if it's Y9+

    Kodu is good but a big ask for the techs. Also much better with a USB XBox controller.


     
  4. I'll throw in Alice into the mix, and also Scratch BYOB as an extension to Scratch
     
  5. Undoubtedly Visual Basic 6, you can use it to call the DirectX API
    (Note: not serious .....)
    Is "Games Factory" still available ?
     
  6. Training_2_Teach

    Training_2_Teach New commenter

    Hi could you give me a link to the resources and the official website for this software.

    Thanks
     
  7. Check out Unity - full blown IDE, supports Javascript, Python and others.
    Also if you want to program games completely it has to be XNA although I would highly rate pygame as well if you are already down the python route.
     
  8. This ought to get you started - Link
     
  9. I am looking for software that will run on thin client machines. We already have scratch but want something more
     

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