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G.P. appointments

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by houserabbit, May 30, 2012.

  1. A 2 min. phone discussion with the practice nurse, and a decision is made that no appointment is needed. Why would you phone if you didn't think you needed to see a doctor or (at worst) be allowed to see the nurse? There is the assumption that everyone is a time-wasting attention-seeker.
    Yes, I'm CROSS!
     
  2. A 2 min. phone discussion with the practice nurse, and a decision is made that no appointment is needed. Why would you phone if you didn't think you needed to see a doctor or (at worst) be allowed to see the nurse? There is the assumption that everyone is a time-wasting attention-seeker.
    Yes, I'm CROSS!
     
  3. Torey

    Torey Occasional commenter

    Change GPs if possible. I always get a same day appointment or can book in advance. No one asks why I want one.
     
  4. We live in a village where the practice serves surrounding villages, so it's not a practical option.
    The GPs themselves are great; it's just the housewives' army that surrounds them who are the problem.
     
  5. It's the same where I live, the receptionist questions if you really need to see the Doctor, and then when you do get to see the doctor he says why didn't you come in earlier it's cos I couldn't get an appointment!!
     
  6. Spanakopita

    Spanakopita New commenter

    Write a letter to the practice manager telling her/him of your concerns. The receptionists are not there to decide who gets appointments. They are there to book them for you.
     
  7. Yes, I'd thought about this, but it's actually a practice nurse who makes the decision. It goes:
    Phone surgery as near to 8.00a.m. as possible - usually impossible, because everyone does it.
    Ask the receptionist for an appointment. They merely take phone no. and tell you that the nurse will phone back for a 'triage' discussion.
    Nurse phones back and makes decision.
    It sounds absolutely logical when you write it down. The bit that they forget is that they're not trained to diagnose or ask the relevant questions to gain all the information they need to make the decision.
    I'm particularly cross with this system, knowing that the nurse has made one mistake (re. meds.) and one mistake on phone, as mentioned in O.P.
    Similarly, I've had a GP ask why I hadn't been in sooner, and been given reassurance that urgent cases will always be seen. They just don't see the power that their support staff have and that this isn't true.
     
  8. Torey

    Torey Occasional commenter

    Tell them that you're not going to discuss it over the phone and will only discuss it with the doctor in person. As it is a nurse if you have to tell them challange them as to why they won't give you an appointment. What about your nearest walk in centre?
     
  9. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I still think you should write to the practice manager to tell them that you don't find the system satisfactory and why that is the case.
     
  10. angel09

    angel09 New commenter

    On a different note...I once managed to make an appt. to see a (new young) gp in the practice. He told me that this is an emergency appt. which last only 5 minutes and if I wanted him to check other 'concerns' I should book another appt. for a later date! I got the impression he wants to leave early and I was keeping him.
     
  11. andersoncouncil

    andersoncouncil New commenter

    Our receptionists like to snoop. I rang up for an appointment and when asked what was wrong with me I replied that I wasn't a doctor, therefore I didn't know. It shut her up. I was rather tempted to offer up a tropical disease, leprosy or some form of VD just to catch them out gossiping about people, but erred on the side of caution. OP I am fairly sure you have the right to insist on a consultation if you feel you need one.
     
  12. Got as far as a NURSE today. No voice, much more ill and OH ill too, so by subterfuge we got there.
    The answer for the nosey receptionist is to ask if you've got through to the nurse.
     
  13. Having worked in a surgery, the 'nosy' receptionists are only doing exactly what the GPs are telling them to do.
     
  14. My GP's practice has a brilliant online system for booking appointments - available times and GPs are 'released' onto the system around 6.00pm each evening and you log on to book, change or cancel appointments. They have now used this system for nearly 4 years, so presumably do not have issues regarding people making 'unnecessary' appointments. Patients may also call to arrange appointments in the usual way without going through a triage system - our practice assumes that if you ask for an appointment you need an appointment!
     
  15. mandala1

    mandala1 Occasional commenter

    If people didn't make an appointment with their GP at the slightest ache and pain, GPs would be much more accessible.
     
  16. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Do they? I don't.
     
  17. mandala1

    mandala1 Occasional commenter

    I think my point was more general.
     
  18. Forgive me but I thought that what GPs got paid to do was to heal the sick!
     
  19. My doctors surgery at university used to have receptionists that would ask your symptoms before booking you an appointment and my previous one at home did as well but my current one doesn't. They open at 8 30 am but you never get through on the phone until around 8:50 by which time most of the appointments have been filled.
     
  20. mandala1

    mandala1 Occasional commenter

    Resources are finite and a GPs time is expensive. Lots of people present at their GPs with conditions that are trivial and/or self limiting, about which the GP can do very little. I'm not saying this is what is going on with the OP, but it does explain why those with more serious conditions find their access to their GP regulated.
     

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