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?Funding cuts and its effects on teaching and learning in the Life Long Learning Sector?

Discussion in 'Further Education' started by Boycielad, May 2, 2012.

  1. As a part of my Cert Ed course I'm looking at the subject of ?Funding cuts and its effects on teaching and learning in the Life Long Learning Sector? as my contemporary issue and I'd appreciate some comments and thoughts on the general feeling of those in the not only in the Life Long Learning Sector but also in the Compulsory Education sector.

    Initially I have three questions which I'd appreciate some thoughts on :

    1) Are the ever increasing exam result statistics and the way that the GCSE's are graded, a true representation of the level of achievement of our students?

    2) Is it fair on the students that when they reach FE Colleges etc that even though they might have achieved a GCSE "C" Grade, they need to attend additional Key Skills classes to bring them up to the academic standard in Maths, English or ICT for the primary course that they are attending the establishment for?

    3) The Conservative Party (2012) policy on education states: " We are empowering teachers by..... cutting bureaucracy and guidance, allowing teachers to get on with their job". If this is truly the case then why is it that teachers have more and more work to do to jump through the hoops of Govt. Policies and other initiatives, with less and less funding. Are we getting close to a breaking point?

    Thanks
     
  2. As a part of my Cert Ed course I'm looking at the subject of ?Funding cuts and its effects on teaching and learning in the Life Long Learning Sector? as my contemporary issue and I'd appreciate some comments and thoughts on the general feeling of those in the not only in the Life Long Learning Sector but also in the Compulsory Education sector.

    Initially I have three questions which I'd appreciate some thoughts on :

    1) Are the ever increasing exam result statistics and the way that the GCSE's are graded, a true representation of the level of achievement of our students?

    2) Is it fair on the students that when they reach FE Colleges etc that even though they might have achieved a GCSE "C" Grade, they need to attend additional Key Skills classes to bring them up to the academic standard in Maths, English or ICT for the primary course that they are attending the establishment for?

    3) The Conservative Party (2012) policy on education states: " We are empowering teachers by..... cutting bureaucracy and guidance, allowing teachers to get on with their job". If this is truly the case then why is it that teachers have more and more work to do to jump through the hoops of Govt. Policies and other initiatives, with less and less funding. Are we getting close to a breaking point?

    Thanks
     
  3. bfudge69

    bfudge69 New commenter

    No
    Yes
    Breaking point of who/what?
     
  4. Sorry, I meant to write "Are we who deliver education reaching a breaking point".
     

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