1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

fresh seafood...

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by Si N. Tiffick, Aug 7, 2011.

  1. Si N. Tiffick

    Si N. Tiffick Occasional commenter

  2. Si N. Tiffick

    Si N. Tiffick Occasional commenter

  3. Would put me off seafood/ meat/ anything for life!! I'm sorry if I offend anyone, but the Japanese do seem to me to have a different attitude to food.
     
  4. Si N. Tiffick

    Si N. Tiffick Occasional commenter

    I love Japanese food, but I couldn't stomach seemingly alive food.
     
  5. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    I'd have a go. It's not actually alive, is it? I know we could get into a deep philosphical discussion into what 'alive' actually means, but given that the brain has been removed with the head, and as such the squid has no capacity for pain, then I'm happy that it's dead. I think it's down to the squid having a highly intricate nervous system that the nerve cells are reactivated when the sauce is poured over, rather than any 'life' being left in the creature.
    If you were going to eat raw squid, this would be reassuringly fresh, as well. I guess it's not that different from eating a quivering, raw oyster or sea urchin.
     
  6. Si N. Tiffick

    Si N. Tiffick Occasional commenter

    Did you watch the video clip at the bottom, nick? I know it is dead, but its head is still on and it looks very much alive. Psychologically, I couldn't go near it.
     
  7. Si N. Tiffick

    Si N. Tiffick Occasional commenter

    Oh hold on, I think I read it wrong- it says after the "dancing", it's taken back to the kitchen to have the body removed. Just not sure what the difference- in squid terms is between body and head.
     
  8. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    I know what you mean, and I think there might be a few inaccuracies in the article relating to naming the body parts. We'll assume the head is where the eyes are and what the tentacles are attached to, with the large sac that calamari are made from to be the body (called the mantle, I've just discovered!)
    I've done a bit of research and it seems that the brain is indeed in the head (i.e. behind the eyes), and so it might still be intact (although it might well have been removed, along with the inedible beak that's in that part of the squid). However, the mantle contains the gills and other important organs such as its hearts (at least 2 of the 3 hearts it has, I think) and I think that the removal of the mantle would be sufficient to kill the squid.
    I think that it would move regardless of the sauce being poured on it, if it was still alive. As the article states, I think it's merely electrical impulses being created when the salty sauce is poured over. It only moves when the specific sauce is poured over, so I'm fairly sure it's dead.
    Psychologically, though, I can understand why people would feel uncomfortable eating something that appears to be alive. It wouldn't bother me though, as long as I was sure that the animal was indeed dead and not suffering.
    There's a point to be made about food being seen as entertainment rather than something worty in its own right, I suppose, but this sort of thing is nothing new. It was popular in the middle ages and the Romans were mad for it. Heston Blumenthal makes a hugely successful career out of it as well!
     
  9. Si N. Tiffick

    Si N. Tiffick Occasional commenter

    You're absolutely tight, nick- I'm just getting more squeamish in my old age, I guess. I do recall as a child having a chicken's foot (don't ask me why or how I came across the chicken's foot- that bit I don't recall) and being fascinated that you could make its toes (claws?) clench and unclench by pulling hte tendon at the back. Grotty. We also liked scaring my dad with frogs. Now, the thought of any such thing gives me the heebie jeebies!
     
  10. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    Yep - and I know I'm probably in the minority (insofar as Brits go anyway) in being happy to eat something like this. Mrs909 wouldn't go near it, that's for sure.
    In fact, you mentioning chicken feet has reminded me of a meal in a dim sum restaurant in Chinatown in New York where Mrs909 looked on in bizarre fascination as I tucked into a plate of braised and deep fried chicken feet alongside a small bowl of tripe broth. The chicken feet were delicious - tender and juicy (what do they taste like? Well, chicken, oddly enough!) and the tripe broth was salty and deeply savoury and the tripe itself was slippery and succulent (I gathered that texture plays a big part in authentic Chinese food). She assured me that she was perfectly happy with her braised pork ribs and steamed dumplings, thank you very much though.
     

Share This Page