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Free flow and morning activities (also posted in primary)

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by jo123go, Jun 18, 2011.

  1. Hi all,
    I'm moving from Year 5 to year 1 and need advice!
    The year 1 class at the moment is rather formal and I'm going to try and make it more foundation stage-y with areas for continuous provision e.t.c
    The classroom has an enclosed outside area that I'm looking forward to developing- but (I'm going to sound like such a sissy!) do the children use it outside of the warm weather? In my observations of our reception class and current year 1 class the outside area is only used when it's sunny. What do you / your children do? Presumably it's ok just to tell them to get their coats on and get out there (within reason!). Also, the door's very heavy- it's propped open when it's hot but when the heating's on in the winter I guess the children will just have to ask an adult to open the door if the want to go outside. Does that sound ok?
    Also, the class at the moment has tables for the children (rather than areas of learning) and in the morning the children sit at their tables and get on with an activity laid out for them e.g. colouring in / reading / puzzles. I've been reading lots of threads on here and looked at photos in the resource section and I'd love to set my classroom up with learning areas rather than formal seating. If you do this, what do your children do when they come in in the morning? (As they won't all have somewhere to sit).
    Would be very grateful for any advice given!
    Thanks,
    Jo
     
  2. Hi all,
    I'm moving from Year 5 to year 1 and need advice!
    The year 1 class at the moment is rather formal and I'm going to try and make it more foundation stage-y with areas for continuous provision e.t.c
    The classroom has an enclosed outside area that I'm looking forward to developing- but (I'm going to sound like such a sissy!) do the children use it outside of the warm weather? In my observations of our reception class and current year 1 class the outside area is only used when it's sunny. What do you / your children do? Presumably it's ok just to tell them to get their coats on and get out there (within reason!). Also, the door's very heavy- it's propped open when it's hot but when the heating's on in the winter I guess the children will just have to ask an adult to open the door if the want to go outside. Does that sound ok?
    Also, the class at the moment has tables for the children (rather than areas of learning) and in the morning the children sit at their tables and get on with an activity laid out for them e.g. colouring in / reading / puzzles. I've been reading lots of threads on here and looked at photos in the resource section and I'd love to set my classroom up with learning areas rather than formal seating. If you do this, what do your children do when they come in in the morning? (As they won't all have somewhere to sit).
    Would be very grateful for any advice given!
    Thanks,
    Jo
     
  3. Why do you want to be so much like the reception class. Some of these children will have had full-time nursery and then reception. Do they really need another year of crawling on carpets and scribbling menus in 'writing' areas. There is nothing inherently wrong with sitting/working/playing at a table infact it can be quite relaxing. Don't be so keen to mimic the FS it's not like the panacea for all our woes infact it may be the cause of some of them. Why not give your Y1 children something new and challenging rather than you working with a handful of children while a complete bunfight is going on in the background.
     
  4. That's a refreshing view-point and definitely food for thought, thank you.
     
  5. I have recently continuous provision to year 1 and 2 at my school, after visiting and observing a whole range of approaches across the LEA.
    We now only have two group tables in the classroom and the rest of the room is set up into "working and learning areas" - role-play, sand, water, small-world, writing, art and craft, book corner, construction, IWB/laptops, dough, and a few changable ones.
    We have 5 groups for Lit and Num and 5 sessions of each per week. We plan so that each group has one guided session with the teacher and one guided session with the TA each week in both subjects.
    To extend and challenge the children further than the EYFS, when they are working independently (not "choosing") we give them challenge activities.
    This would mean for example, if you were doing instructions in Lit, your input and guided work would be based on reading and writing instructions. Challenge areas could include; following instructions to make a paper windmill in the art area; following picture instructions to build a lego house and then writing your own on wbs for a partner to follow, finding instruction sentences in the sand and putting them in order; exploring books in the challenge box to find instructions.
    This has been very successful and has worked particularly well to encourage and engage lower ability pupils. We only started this after Christmas and the children took to it suprisingly well, they are very independent and work hard at the challenges, allowing you to really concentrate on your guided group and pick up on things you would otherwise miss if the whole class were writing at the same time etc.


     
  6. Hi Glitterpixie,
    I'm not sure if you are still active on here but I'm an NQT teaching in year 1 and am using challenges to enhance learning in my classroom. I haven't quite got the hang of using them across all areas and would be grateful if you could offer me some more ideas/advice please?!
    Many thanks!
    Tink
     
  7. cinderella1

    cinderella1 New commenter

    If you read the new revised eyfs then the reception year is meant to be more formal, and by the end of nursery the children are meant to be spending more time doing group activities in preparation for reception. I too cant understand why you would want your year one class like a free choice reception class. Yes have some areas for children to use independently when they have finshed their work. Will it be possible for you to deliver the curriculum objectives to which they are all legally entitled within this way? Something that often surprises me is when the children move to year one, each year they always say, its great we do real work. I do think they actually enjoy the structure. Dont forget that they are still young so would need an adult outside with them :) x
     

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