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Four Day Week Anyone?

Discussion in 'Scotland - education news' started by GuessWho, Feb 6, 2011.

  1. GuessWho

    GuessWho Occasional commenter

    http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/education/schools-face-4-day-week-1.1083598
    Here's part of the article.....
    As Scotland braces itself for the full impact of spending cuts, officials from a cash-strapped local authority have put forward proposals to save money by introducing a four-day week in all primary and secondary schools.
    The suggestion by North Ayrshire Council would require parents taking an extra day off work, but critics have slammed the move as “stupid” and “a sad state of affairs”.
     
  2. GuessWho

    GuessWho Occasional commenter

    http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/education/schools-face-4-day-week-1.1083598
    Here's part of the article.....
    As Scotland braces itself for the full impact of spending cuts, officials from a cash-strapped local authority have put forward proposals to save money by introducing a four-day week in all primary and secondary schools.
    The suggestion by North Ayrshire Council would require parents taking an extra day off work, but critics have slammed the move as “stupid” and “a sad state of affairs”.
     
  3. A 47½

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    week session is just nuts. The prospect of an 8.30am - 5.00pm day to fit 25 hours of statutory teaching in to 4 days has just as much appeal. How on earth does it save any money?
    There's "thinking the unthinkable" but this appears to have been a waste of someone's precious time.
     
  4. Oops! Trying to be smart and adding a 0.5 fraction chucked in a whole load of rubbish. [​IMG]
     
  5. I noticed in this report that the Director of Education in N Ayrshire commented on the "statutory" 25-hours--per-week, yet in all the hoo-haw about Renfrewshire's modest proposal, everyone, including the GTCS, has been bending over backwards to point out that in fact, there is NO statutory requirement in Scotland for schools to be open to pupils for 25 hours a week, that the statutory requirement is in fact for 190 days, and that 25 hours/5hours per day is generally accepted as the norm, as opposed to being legislated.
    Edinburgh is already spreading the *traditional" 25 hours over 4.5 days, is that not so? And in that case, is the half day counted as a full day for statutory purposes? I'm totally confused. Can someone, anyone, clarify this once and for all?
     
  6. Did anyone notice that the Herald report said......"One of the doomsday scenarios, contained in an official budget briefing document, is to reduce the school week from five days to four. Unions were last month briefed on the plan...."
    Has anyone hear from their union about this yet?
     
  7. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    Indeed. Could someone (anyone,not bothered who) take charge and make some decisions instead of leaving it to local councillors in various councils to come up with various stupid ideas.
     
  8. Dominie

    Dominie New commenter

    That would be the unions in North Ayrshire.

    I only heard of this wheeze late last week. Mad as a bucket of frogs. Totally Tonto. As pointed out in the press today it would mean a teaching year of 47.5 weeks. (190 days divide by 4days = 47.5). Each day would have to be a minimum 6.25 hrs. (Plus non contact time of 35 mins plus collegiate time).

    I assume the saving would come from shutting the lights and heating off for the extra day.

    The issue of the assymentric week as in Lothian is a bit of a distraction since the normal teaching hours are squeezed into 4.5 days.
     
  9. Flyonthewall75

    Flyonthewall75 New commenter

    Maybe I'm wrong but isn't it common for politicians to suggest a 'doomsday scenario' so that when they come up with a less drastic, but equally unacceptable, proposal it doesn't seem so bad, at least to parents.
    The issue with the asymmetric week is that it still requires a school to open 5 days each week (excluding holidays) even if it closes, for pupils, at lunchtime on a Friday after the completion of the 25 or 27.5 hour pupil week.
    To operate a 4 day week would, as has been pointed out, require a change to the Schools General (Scotland) Regulations 1975 and a reduction in the 190 statutory days. Regardless of any potential savings, that would have a severe impact on childcare arrangements and a knock-on effect for the rest of the economy.
    I suspect it is simply a scaremongering tactic so that parents can be duped into accepting other damaging changes to education.
    Here's hoping they will see through it.
     
  10. halfajack

    halfajack Occasional commenter

    Not sure how much more of this stupidy I can take before I abandon ship and move to Australia!
     
  11. halfajack

    halfajack Occasional commenter

    Although, having just read the article in full, I notice Edinburgh is considering reducing the number of depute heads... Hope for us yet?
     
  12. Has nobody considered the fact that once pupils have had their lunch, their brains turn to mince? They would never survive being in school longer in the afternoons. If anything, they should have a shorter day, maybe 8.00-12.30, German-style? Then we would have all afternoon for planning/collegiate working :)
     
  13. If you're going to do that, I'd recommend that you don't abandon your ship - it would probably come in handy there right now.
    It's not a move I would make in the forseeable future - if you think our spending cuts are fierce, I suspect that their's will be fiercer, given the amount of damage caused by recent natural disasters.
     
  14. Or go a step further and make it even shorter - say three hours a day over four days. We can concentrate on the 3 R's & classify all the rest as 'enrichment activities' which can be done elsewhere by someone else. Even better, that could address the class size problem - each teacher could have a morning group and an afternoon group, both with 15 pupils. We have Fridays for planning etc.

    Sorted!
     
  15. Does anyone have any links to studies that back this up. I'm currently drafting <strike>yet another</strike> letter to my <strike>poor</strike> MSP and some facts and figures would look more impressive than my current anecdotal evidence of the post lunch feral-ness (!) of my pupils.
     
  16. halfajack

    halfajack Occasional commenter

    Hmm...possibly but I think their economy was still thriving despite the 'global economic crisis.' My brother works for an American company in Sydney and says they're having to work hard to keep employees in the face of temptation of higher salaries, better hours and bigger bonuses offered by their Australian rivals. Apparently they do it by encouraging a 'family ethos' and tailoring professional development to each individual's needs so they feel valued and able to progress. Got to admire that! I'd be well up for the more money for less working hours lark!
     
  17. Christopher  Curtis

    Christopher Curtis Occasional commenter

    RailroadGin,


    We?ll handle the natural disasters without batting an eyelid. Australia is the stand-out economy of the developed world. We didn?t even bother having a recession. Unemployment is around 5 per cent. The Commonwealth government will be in surplus by 2012-13. It will make some cuts in some areas to shift spending to Queensland, but they won?t be huge. The total cost was estimated at only $5.6 billion before the cyclone, and a special flood levy on incomes of over $50,000 will raise $1.8 billion of that. The Victorian government has been in surplus year-in year-out for almost two decades and is forecast to remain so. I?m not sure if Queensland has had exactly the same record, but it has been pretty close. Total spending by state governments is forecast to go from $195.7 billion this financial year to $204 billion next financial year, so there won?t be any overall cuts there.
     
  18. holdingon

    holdingon Occasional commenter

    what are the job opportunities for teachers like
     
  19. holdingon

    holdingon Occasional commenter

    what are the job opportunities for teachers like
     
  20. Christopher  Curtis

    Christopher Curtis Occasional commenter

    holdingon,


    if you are directing your question at me, I can say I don?t know. There are certainly opportunities for teachers in some subjects, such as maths, and in more remote areas of the country. It is hard to say in Victoria as the new government has just told us that it will be cutting $338 million from the education budget over the next four years. It says this won?t affect teachers, but the party in power now has form. I offer the following for anyone who has not already seen it as some useful history on that party?s time in power:


    Don?t Give Up - the Eternal Battle
    .

    There?s a longer discussion at Teaching in Australia
     

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