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foundation gcse ofsted lesson

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by Katharinew, Mar 6, 2011.

  1. Our maths department are being visited wed/thurs this week.
    I have planned and sorted 10/12 lessons, however I have ran out of inspiration for my year 11's.
    They will have 2 x50 min lessons over the 2 days. They are foundation set7 out of 9, C/D/E level. Some are sitting their final module some are sitting linear. We have completed the syllabus and are relearning and revising in lessons. They are nice well behaved kids who will have a go at most activities.
    Does anyone have any ideas or inspiration as I have ran out:(
    Thank you
     
  2. Our maths department are being visited wed/thurs this week.
    I have planned and sorted 10/12 lessons, however I have ran out of inspiration for my year 11's.
    They will have 2 x50 min lessons over the 2 days. They are foundation set7 out of 9, C/D/E level. Some are sitting their final module some are sitting linear. We have completed the syllabus and are relearning and revising in lessons. They are nice well behaved kids who will have a go at most activities.
    Does anyone have any ideas or inspiration as I have ran out:(
    Thank you
     
  3. DM

    DM New commenter

    What topic would you normally have done? Tell us that and how you would normally have taught it and we can help jazz it up a bit.
     
  4. Thanks for your reply.
    Last week we were multiplying out brackets. I was planning on finding the product of double brackets this week. I do not know if that would be a good/interesting lesson for ofsted so I was thinking of some C/D booster work, but that is were my brain burnt out
     
  5. Go with what you had planned - if it's right for the students then it's the right lesson to do.
    Don't do something that is alien to you and your class - it'll stand out like a sore thumb. Do what you would have done usually and make sure it's polished and that, in your lesson plan, it's clear why you are doing this topic now.
    Good luck.
     
  6. bombaysapphire

    bombaysapphire Star commenter

    How did you teach this? Did you use a grid?
    If so you could do an activity where students match the question to the grid and then to the answer. I have one if you pm me with your e-mail address.
    I would suggest a starter on collecting like terms and making sure they can cope with the likes of:
    • mixtures of x^2 and x
    • +4x - 6x
    • -4x - 6x
    It would be a risky choice of topic if they are not sound on their arithmetic with negatives.
     
  7. KYP

    KYP New commenter

    If you are looking for ideas, there is good stuff on algebra in the Standards Unit (Improving Learning in Maths) folders, or the Mathematical Moments on misconceptions, collaborative work - but only if your students are used to that sort of work!
     
  8. I have taught this to them before a while ago using FOIL, they were really good that lesson but cannot remember it at all. I was planning (before I knew ofsted were coming) on teaching it using the grid method. I would only introduce negative numbers to some of the class as an extension, or maybe a follow up lesson for all of them if their understanding went well.
    I would really appreciate that worksheet, I will message you my email. thanks
     
  9. Hi, we got done the other week. The emphasis that week is all students making progress. They were not impressed with our revision lessons (with year 10 in our case) because of the lack of progress (they argued that "revision" implies they've already learned it). As an aside, one teacher had taken the results of assessments and created personalised MyMaths task sheets for his class. His revision lesson included 20minutes in the computer room using these. The OFSTED inspector told him that despite great behaviour and teacher-student relationships he couldn't get higher than Satisfactory because, although the students were talking and helping each other, it wasn't actually planned group work and the inspector needed to see teacher-facilitated discussion for a Good or higher. Good Luck.
     
  10. pencho

    pencho New commenter

    Prepare a set of 12 questions cards (e.g. common past exam questions).
    Ask students to work in pairs to look at the questions and see which they can answer.
    Ask them to rate them from those they definetley can do those they have no clue about.
    Circulate the class and determine which questions the majority of the class are struggling with. Do a quick 10 minute revisit of this topic. Same again for next question they are struggling with etc...
    Works well
     
  11. Some good ideas already.

    I like showig them a question on finding the area of a square which involves writing an expression, then the equation, then solving.

    How about getting kids to write their ownFOIL question (once you're happy with them) and swap. Then pick a few to come out to the board (if you normally do that)
     
  12. Thank you for all your help and advice, my maths brain has now been refreshed and I have 2 basic lessons plans written, teaching what I originally planned. I will write them fully tomorrow but I do feel confident with the content.
    Thanks again for the little bit of inspiration I needed x
     
  13. DM

    DM New commenter

    Good luck.
     
  14. Just a random question

    I have never used FOIL

    I used to use SMILEY FACE but now I use CLAW

    Does everyone else use FOIL
     
  15. bombaysapphire

    bombaysapphire Star commenter

    I use FOIL in higher sets, and with my Year 12s, when the students are going to go on to factorising. I find it easier to explain what is going on with factorising with an ax^2 (a not 1) when I can refer to the letters of FOIL and where the terms are coming from.
    With lower sets who aren't going to get beyond expanding the double brackets, and for whom the arithmetic with negatives can be an issue, I use a grid. It's a useful opportunity to re-enforce the grid method for long multiplication too.
     
  16. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I tutor GCSE maths and am getting used to the different methods taught. Personally I was just taught "That times that, that times that, that times that and that times that" - very visual explanation which doesn't come across easily on a thread!
    Personally I love the grid method for weaker students - it just shows so easily what happens to the "x" value and how the factors work. Just wish they remembered that X times X is not 2X.
    I do like the idea of linking it to say the area of a rectangle. Will they understand how to make one side zero to solve it?
     
  17. DM

    DM New commenter

    I use the parrot (copyright DM).
     
  18. DM

    DM New commenter

  19. Subtract the head and you have the CLAW [​IMG]
     
  20. I never use a grid just the different versions of FOIL that I mentioned [​IMG]
     

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