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Formula-feeding advice

Discussion in 'Parenting' started by daisy_123, Apr 11, 2012.

  1. I would really appreciate some advice from those of you who formula-feed.
    My LO is 2 months old now and taking 6 or 7 bottles a day, 1 of which is EBM. I have some worries about formula-feeding because I want to make sure I'm not over- or underfeeding her. As far as we can tell, our LO will drink as much as is on offer at each feeding, so the advice to put more than you think you'll need in a bottle is no use to us. How do you know you're feeding your LO the right amount? I am not keen on feeding routines for little babies, but would like to have a loose schedule so I can keep track of what she's having each day (would be much easier if we could keep it to 6 bottles daily) - do any of you use feeding schedules or do you think we should just continue feeding on demand? We currently put 5oz in each bottle. Also, does your LO have bottles at regular intervals or do you have a longer gap at night while sleeping?
    Thanks!
     
  2. I should add, if I put 5oz of water in a bottle and add 5 scoops of formula it makes a 6oz bottle. Is this right? Do you call this 5oz or 6oz then? So far we haven't let her drink this much at a feed because her tummy is still so small, but we mix them like this.
     
  3. FollyFairy

    FollyFairy Occasional commenter

    With my daughter, when we moved onto formula, I had approx set routines for feeding as formula seemed to fill her up more than BM. The best person to advice you is your HV, if you have a good relationship with her (mine was awfu!) and write feeding times down - what time and how much, this means you will be able to easily track how much your LO has. Night times can be difficult as they don't always understand that it is night-time and still want food... you could always give your LO a bottle just before you go to bed. My daughter used to drink this late bottle half asleep but it did mean that she slept longer! Also check out: http://www.bounty.com/baby
     

  4. I agree with getting in touch with your HV. or, what you can do, depending on your milk you use, is check tehir website - I was wondering about hungry milk with my first and aptamil have peopple who you can speak to about feeding queries. with my first it took a good few months to get into a routine. My first was like yours in that he would pretty much eat whatever you offered but my 7 week old will quite stubbornly push the teat out when he's full up. I always give him a minute and then try again to make sure.
    As folly says, keep a note of what they eat and when. my baby book says if you do this then divide it by the number of bottles you can see how much to offer at each feed but i didn;t try that first time round.
    I have noticed that the milk seems to make more - when LO was taking four ounce feeds and I was heading out, I'd make up 8 oz in one bottle then split between two - it always seemed to make up a 4oz and a 5 oz bottle. But maybe it's just the bubbles?
     
  5. Thanks both for your comments. I have been noting down feeding times and amounts for the last few days, which is reassuring. Last night was the first time ever she went the whole night without feeding - from half midnight till 8 this morning. She did wake up, but it as with wind and then she went back asleep by herself. Having kept track of feeding at least I wasn't worried she had too little milk, it goes to show how babies' patterns change from day to day though, which is why I don't want to impose a routine at this young age. I will be interested to see if this happens again tonight though!
    Unfortunately there are no HVs where we live - should have mentioned we are in Spain. Sadly there is no support like that at all here. I think the idea is that families support new mums and babies after birth.
     
  6. chocolateheaven

    chocolateheaven New commenter

    I was told that most babies tell you when they're full by pushing the bottle out of their mouth, turning head away etc. If they don't, then most simply puke back up whatever won't fit in their stomach. Not sure if this is true though, as I'm a newbie too.
     
  7. Hi chocolateheaven, she used to do this when she was very little sometimes, but now it seems like it takes her a while to realise she's full. When we think she's had enough now we use a dummy to check. She sucks it for a few seconds and gets very upset it has no milk if she's still hungry. Otherwise she sucks away happily and we presume this to mean she's had enough. No idea if this is recommended or not, but it seems to work for now.
     
  8. FWIW I was offering 6 scoops at each feed to my second by 2 months. If the baby takes a lot then that is good because they should then start spacing feeds out more. By 2 months if they are feeding well they may be moving towards 5. Personally I find schedules and writing down is stressful because they naturally have hungry and less hungry days. This one at 2 months was taking up to 1000ml in one day and she is still on the 25th centile!!!!! My first seemed to hardly eat anything but weighed the same. I reckon feed what they want when they want, they are creatures of habit anyway and gradually a routine emerges.
     
  9. Chica77

    Chica77 New commenter

    My daughter was mix fed to begin with and started on just formula at about 11 weeks. She was a pain though, she'd only take an oz at a time, and even by 6 months she was only having about 5oz bottles. She's 11 months exactly and she has 7oz bottles now, but doesn't always drink them all. She has 2 or 3 bottles a day, but she eats a lot.
    She would just push the bottle out, or chew on it, when she didn't want anymore.
    I don't think you can overfeed a baby because they'll only take what they need.
     

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