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Forgotten childhood fears.

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Benbamboo, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. Benbamboo

    Benbamboo Occasional commenter

    Had you asked me a week ago if I had any phobias, I would most likely have scoffed in your face as I inwardly pitied people who flinched at spiders and refused to fly. Now, however, I would respond differently.
    I have spend the week on a skiing holiday with friends. I have been skiing once before, on a schooll trip to France as a 10 year old. It was a magical week, full of happy memories and, I have since discovered, one repressed memory as well. The week started well, we caught the train to Aviemore and the trains/change overs went swimmingly. The house we rented was immaculate and full of mod cons, not too far from the slopes. Brilliant!
    We caught the bus up next morning, rented our ski gear and hit the slopes. I had some apprehension about skiing as it had been so long since I last went (a good 20 years or so) but I am happy trying new things and making a fool out of myself trying so we got on the funicular (a new word for me)and made our way to the top of the mountain. It seems themountain we were on hadn't actually seen fresh snow fall for a while so few routes were open, which suited me and down we went. Not far from the top down I went, literally, a position I would find myself in several times before reaching the bottom. Often followed by small children floating majestically across the snow in utmost control as if they had been born there and never left. All this never bothered me, I was having fun. But then I got to the bottom.
    I joined the queue and edged forwards bit by bit until we rounded the corner and I came face to face with the only thing that has ever really terrified me. The ski lift, to be precise, the button lift. It all came back to me, the sleepless nights, the tears, the dread of skiing down the mountin knowing it would be waiting for me when I got there. All the irrational fears returned in an instant: what if I fell off and the next person ran over me; what if I fell off and got left behind; what if I couldn't get off at the end and got lifted up on it...and so on.
    I told myself I was just being silly until I reached the second place in the line and bottled it - "I need to wait for my friend" was the bad excuse that came out as I edged back the the end of the line. I watched everyone get on with ease as I returned to the front and decided it really was easy. I am an adult I told myself and slid boldly in position. The button came round and I felt pretty good, until I got hold of it and my legs turned to jelly. In a panic I didn't get the button in position to sit on, yet I kept hold as it dragged my a good 10 feet up the slope before my skis fell off and I had to let go. To compound my ridicule the operator stopped the entire lift until I had crawled off the slope.
    I did manage to get back to the top of the slope, although each time I went through the same nerves and terror. A couple of times I even fell off mid journey and had to ski only half the slope. However, never again will I mock the wife for not wanting to read the gas meter because spiders live in the box.
     
  2. Benbamboo

    Benbamboo Occasional commenter

    Had you asked me a week ago if I had any phobias, I would most likely have scoffed in your face as I inwardly pitied people who flinched at spiders and refused to fly. Now, however, I would respond differently.
    I have spend the week on a skiing holiday with friends. I have been skiing once before, on a schooll trip to France as a 10 year old. It was a magical week, full of happy memories and, I have since discovered, one repressed memory as well. The week started well, we caught the train to Aviemore and the trains/change overs went swimmingly. The house we rented was immaculate and full of mod cons, not too far from the slopes. Brilliant!
    We caught the bus up next morning, rented our ski gear and hit the slopes. I had some apprehension about skiing as it had been so long since I last went (a good 20 years or so) but I am happy trying new things and making a fool out of myself trying so we got on the funicular (a new word for me)and made our way to the top of the mountain. It seems themountain we were on hadn't actually seen fresh snow fall for a while so few routes were open, which suited me and down we went. Not far from the top down I went, literally, a position I would find myself in several times before reaching the bottom. Often followed by small children floating majestically across the snow in utmost control as if they had been born there and never left. All this never bothered me, I was having fun. But then I got to the bottom.
    I joined the queue and edged forwards bit by bit until we rounded the corner and I came face to face with the only thing that has ever really terrified me. The ski lift, to be precise, the button lift. It all came back to me, the sleepless nights, the tears, the dread of skiing down the mountin knowing it would be waiting for me when I got there. All the irrational fears returned in an instant: what if I fell off and the next person ran over me; what if I fell off and got left behind; what if I couldn't get off at the end and got lifted up on it...and so on.
    I told myself I was just being silly until I reached the second place in the line and bottled it - "I need to wait for my friend" was the bad excuse that came out as I edged back the the end of the line. I watched everyone get on with ease as I returned to the front and decided it really was easy. I am an adult I told myself and slid boldly in position. The button came round and I felt pretty good, until I got hold of it and my legs turned to jelly. In a panic I didn't get the button in position to sit on, yet I kept hold as it dragged my a good 10 feet up the slope before my skis fell off and I had to let go. To compound my ridicule the operator stopped the entire lift until I had crawled off the slope.
    I did manage to get back to the top of the slope, although each time I went through the same nerves and terror. A couple of times I even fell off mid journey and had to ski only half the slope. However, never again will I mock the wife for not wanting to read the gas meter because spiders live in the box.
     
  3. whapbapboogy

    whapbapboogy New commenter

    Wow! You should write for the glossies!
    [​IMG]
    On a more mundane level, I myself was afraid of the loo flushing. Used to get myself mentally and physically psyched up to stampede down the stairs once I pulled the chain. It's probably quite a common childhood fear- that there is a watery monster about to leap out at you through the pan as the water comes crashing down.
     
  4. angiebabe

    angiebabe New commenter

    Hills, gradients of any sort freak me out!! I live in quite a flat area and don't often venture onto hilly ground (I mean hilly not the bridge over the railway type hilly). I'd forgotten how afraid I was until I recently had to drop a friend off in a multi-storey car park as part of a bus terminal. The entrance and exit were spiral and the sides of the spiral were very low so I could see how high I was. I was terrified! Had to give myself a good talking to before I could actually exit at 2mph - even looked for another way out.
    Then a few weeks ago I was in the Peak District - knew it was going to be tricky for me but my daughter already thinks I'm a wuzz so I said nothing. I was proud of myself for driving there and back on my own and some of the gradients were really scarey, added to the fact that it was icey.
    Take you back 10yrs when driving through US with daughter I totally bottled out of driving across the innocuously(sp?) named Rainbow Bridge across the Mississippi - we had to park up and daughter drove whilst I had my eye closed!
    Take you back even further to when I was 11yrs old and I was trapped on the slopping shingle of Perrenport Beach with my family as the tide came in!!! And I used to have recurring dream about not being able to stop on downward windy roads in wales before I was even able to drive.
    So you see I fully understand my phobia and generally it doesn't stop me doing stuff but I get very nervous going to new places, just in case it is hilly (case in point some parts of Auz where I missed lots of sights because I had my eyes close - brother was driving that time not me driving with my eyes closed ha! ha!).
     
  5. My weirdest childhood phobia was of black toilet seats-I wasn't scared of any other colour but was terrified of black toilet seats in particular. I used to give myself bladder infections holding on all day as all the toilet seats in school were black. I would run past the cubicles even when the door was shut, simply because I knew the toilet seats were black. It lasted for around 3 years and then inexplicably went away-I can now use them normally. I think it might have been an Aspergers related thing though as nobody understands it when I mention it other than other people with AS.
     
  6. tartetatin

    tartetatin New commenter

    OH MY GOODNESS, daydreamer! Sorry to shout but my 10 year old (non AS) had this fear for many a year. To this day she hates old fashioned toilets, both for the black seat and flush chain.
     
  7. That's amazing-I have NEVER heard of anyone who had the same specific fear as me! I used to fear the old fashioned toilets too (which is what my grandmother had in her house!) Even in the AS meetings I have been to, although people understand because they have been scared of certain colours etc, they have never been scared of a particular colour toilet seat!
     
  8. tartetatin

    tartetatin New commenter

    I too have never encountered anyone else with that particular fear, namely black toilet seats. She is also pretty needle (injection) phobic.
    If you say that you are too, you'll freak me out completely!
     
  9. I used to be terrified of Dalmation dogs as I thought that they had rabies (due to their spots)

    :-/
     
  10. tartetatin

    tartetatin New commenter

    Have just mentioned this coincidence to M, who reliably informs me that to this day, she will not use the black lidded loos at school.
    Given that there's only one white lidded loo (in a huge school!), this isn't music to my ears ... especially as we pay fees for her to attend!
     
  11. tartetatin

    tartetatin New commenter

    and I found greyhounds rather offputting, as I was convinced they were starved! Always felt so sorry for them [​IMG]
     
  12. tartetatin

    tartetatin New commenter

    I was terrified of my grandparents' hot water tank. You know, the old fashioned ones covered in a thick red blanket.
    Oh dear, it seems my daughter and I aren't fans of retro!
     
  13. Grandsire

    Grandsire Senior commenter

    The man with black hair who used to read the news on Midlands Today. He was scary.
     
  14. Water must scare lots of children! I was scared of the sound of the water gurgling down the plug hole after a bath - probably the same water monster who lurks in cisterns. If I was still in the bath and thought I'd hear it I'd get into a right flap and leap out whereas my younger brother would happily sit and play on until the bath was empty.
    As an 8 yr old, my bedroom curtains always had a little triangular gap at the top where they didn't quite meet and I could see light change in that gap as cars went past. I always thought of it as a big monster with it's eye on me.
    And one I don't really like to tell, because it makes me look really racist! As a youngster growing up in a small town in NI, I didn't encounter many ethnic minorities. I hid behind the sofa and cried when I saw milli vanilli perform on TOTP (not because they were miming [​IMG]). I wouldn't come out until mum turned the tv off - I think it was their dreadlocks, I had a book of myths and was terrified of Medusa.
     
  15. Mrs_Frog

    Mrs_Frog New commenter

    Cupboard monsters. Even now I have to make sure that I shut cupboard doors and close drawers propery before I go to bed.
    Also triffids. Heard them outside the bedroom window for years.......so much so that when I was about 10, I heard what I thought was the clicking of the plants outside the room in which I was sleeping (downstairs as my grandfather was staying with us, so I was moved) and couldn't move with fear until I heard my dad get up for work. Laid there solid as a stone for hours!
    B x
     

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