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Food fables

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by BelleDuJour, Mar 3, 2012.

  1. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    This one is actually true!
    There was a brilliant piece on this in New Scientist magazine a few years ago. The calorific value of food does nor include the energy needed to eat or metabolise it but you would need to eat a ridiculous amount of celery to negate the effect of, say, a chocolate digestive, so in theory yes, but in practice, no.
    Cabbage soup does not burn fat as you say Bethannie. But it does help you lose weight if all you eat is cabbage soup, as it contains few calories and lots of fibre. Also, you tend to eat less of it as well, as the diet progresses, as it's so boring!
     
  2. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    Sifting flour is supposed to add air to it (which it does) and hence the air lightens the cake.
    In theory this should make a difference, but in practice I doubt anyone would notice the difference between a cake made with sifted flour and one without sifting the flour. If I didn't have to eat the cakes afterwards (watching my waistline!) I'd feel an experiment coming on!
     
  3. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter

    I remember being taught to hold the sieve well above the bowl when sifting flour....to let more air in!......But somehow, Mum's cakes always came out light and she rarely sifted the flour! (But then Mum flouts all baking rules....and still won prizes!)
    As for the cabbage soup - yes it is low-cal, but so is my delicious pepper/tomato soup....and my to-die-for sprout soup (looks gross, tastes heavenly - if you like sprouts!)...and my spinach soup (although I do like a generous blob of creme fraiche...and not the low-fat sort! on top....)....and my super-garlicky mushroom soup.......in fact loads of veggie soup are low-cal.low-fat/high fibre.....cabbage soup is nothing special!
    So.....celery stick story is not a myth....hmmmmmm....come on Belle....you're the chemist.....home many do I need to eat to negate one ginger snap spread thickly with chocolate Philly....and then I multiply that amount by 6!!!!! (damn you, whoever invented this chocoate cheese delight!)....*books her driver to take her celery shopping soon!*
     
  4. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    Dunno Bethannie but I will try to locate the New Scientist article.
    Reading what you wrote about soup (and yes, many soups are deliciously low calorie) brought to mind another food myth..........that creme fraiche is better for you and lower fat than double cream. RUBBISH!
    Creme fraiche is a form of soured cream and has just as many calories as double cream. There is a lower fat version but, TBH, if you're going to have cream have the proper stuff. I get so cross hearing cooks/chefs on TV referring to creme fraiche as 'healthier' or 'lower fat'.
    Rant over!
     
  5. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    It appears it's not just celery. Onions, mushrooms, cucumber, spinach, cauliflower are all 'negative' calories. So, spinach or cauliflower soup is good, but not galric mushrooms or cauliflower cheese, Damn!
    Can't find the original NS article. Pity.............it was really interesting.
     
  6. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

  7. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter

    So....onions and mushrooms and spinach and cauli....plus as I recall spices speed up the metabolism....making curry the ultimate diet food!....(providing I forego the onion bahjee...the Peshwari Naan....the Pilau rice.....)

    I echo your rant on low-fat substitutes!
    I remember someone attempting to make shortbread with low-fat spread....NO!!!!!!....it needs butter!....Make the good stuff, eat one piece and give the rest away!
    And I want BUTTER on my toast....because I <u>can</u> believe that the overly yellow spread isn't butter!...I'll just eat a little less of it thanks (well maybe not...I'll cut back elsewhere!)....and if you look at the list of ingredients in the 'healthy' spread, I'll stick to good butter!
    As a supreme insult to good food, I know a little cafe that sells a 'healthy bacon sarnie...they start with two slices of granary bread - (which is a sin in itself, bacon butties only ever should be made with white bread!)...then they smear the bread with a littel low-fat mayo (because butter is 'unhealthy')...and add grilled bacon that has had the last vestige of fat patted away woth a kitchen towel(AGGGGGGH Bacon needs a l little fat!)....and add a couple of slices of tomato (WRONG!!! it should be a splodge of ketchup or brown sauce)....and they have the gall to charge &pound;3.49 for this!
     
  8. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    [​IMG]
     
  9. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    Criminal. That bacon sandwich should be put out of its misery.
     
  10. jonkers

    jonkers New commenter

    I too used to think that this was a ridiculous, unnecessary, adult spoiler, until 5 years ago when one of the boys at our school did indeed have his eye poked out by a stick during a normal after school "playdate" at a friends house. What was left of his eye had to be surgically removed that day. What was amazing was that he was back at school 2 days later - his mother felt that it was vital that he came to terms with his injury straight away - and 4 months later he was playing U14 County cricket. Try shutting one eye and see what your peripheral vision is like.
     
  11. jonkers

    jonkers New commenter

    Shellfish - brain food, my father the Doctor, long before it was fashionable. Our family used to spend weekends at the beach catching crabs and shrimp in rockpools and hacking limpets and winkles from rocks as the tide went out.
    We do the same with our children whilst on holiday - no weekly trips to the seaside to forage for food these days, not whilst there is a supermarket 3 miles away[​IMG]
     
  12. the evil tokoloshe

    the evil tokoloshe New commenter

    One of the worst I heard whilst at Uni was relayed by a friend seeing an alternative medicine 'specialist'. Apparently mangoes are poisonous to your spirit.
    I also was once told as a kid that eating cassava could kill you (there is a grain of truth as raw cassava would not be very good for you, and if not properly prepared it can contain cyanide).
    The stomach cramps after eating was common and swimming straight after eating can cause vomiting which presumably is where it came from.
    A cup of hot tea is better than a glass of water for cooling you down on a hot day - no idea why this one was ever considered but my Gran was an avid believer.
     
  13. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    Brilliant. So many memories form my childhood, bursting in after playing out on a hot summer's day, demanding ice cold pop only to be told "have a cup of tea - that'll cool you down". Like any 9 year old would be, I was suitably aghast.
    I can see there's some scientific thought at play - a hot drink may make you sweat more on a hot day and the evaporating sweat will make your skin feel cooler temporarily. As for your internal temperature - no it won't cool you down.
    Think about the logic here - what do you want to warm you up on a cold day? A hot drink, right? So why doesn't a steaming cuppa cool you down in the middle of winter yet supposedly does in summer?
    And reverse that logic - would you ever recommend an ice cream to warm the cockles on a winter's day?
    There is the fact that in many hot countries hot tea is consumed avidly, but I think that's more down to tea being refreshing rather than any cooling down properties.
     
  14. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    It's the same reasoning as eating hot curries/spicy food cools you down.
    Both chillies and hot drinks make you sweat, and it's the evaporation of sweat that cools you!
    I'd still rather have a chilled <strike>G&T</strike> glass of water!
    [​IMG]
     
  15. If you have more than one ice cream in a day your stomach will freeze (but not if you are on holiday).

     
  16. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    Soz...............read nick's reply after posting [​IMG]
    There's a big difference though between skin temperature and core temperature but this is too much science for first thing on a Thursday [​IMG]
     
  17. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter


    Coca Cola will dissolve your stomach lining - and various bones too. 'Scientific' proof for this was that coins are stripped clean in cola and a tooth was apparently soaked in cola and dissolved.
    There was a direct correlation between the food we left on our plates and the starving children in Africa. 'Eat up your sprouts,...there's many a starving child in Africa would be grateful for them!'......strange thing is, I have grown to really love sprouts, I yum them up in all sorts opf ways!
    And the green triangle choclates in Quality Street don't taste nice. Mum was actually doing us all a favour by taking them out of the pack and eating them.
     
  18. I missed that, Belle. I shall have to have a look. I am constantly bemused by the t'is / t'isn't debate on that!
    I had decided that it isn't the chewing but the thermic effect that outweighed the calories that rae extractable from celery. Then, like you say, decided that the amount you would have to eat (8kcals per stick) would be terminally boring!
    Now how many sticks to reach 3,500kcals... erm, 437.5 ish! No, not really doable!
     
  19. the evil tokoloshe

    the evil tokoloshe New commenter

    Back to the cup of tea, I do understand that it will make you sweat which cools the skin, however, its not exactly going to cool you down overall.
    Have to say that a nice hot cup of masala tea on a hot day gives the combined curry and tea effect of making me sweat cobbs, however, the overall effect is heating me up.
    There are constant dieting adverts on mail order stuff over here for an 'amazing weightloss soap'. Apparently you use the soap after exercising and you too can lose weight (only as part of a calorie controlled diet) - not a traditional fable but those and the herbal weightloss tablets have to go down as fables eventually.
    There is one plant which does actually work (so it becomes less fabulous). The council for scientific research over here looked at a plant eaten by the San when they went without food for a number of days (eg. when hunting was scarce) which apparently naturally removes hunger pangs. Problem is that it is virtually impossible to cultivate.
     
  20. My Nan believed all sorts of nonsense about food
    • Eating raw potatoes will give you worms
    • The seedless ends of cucumber is poisonous - the poison can be removed using a bizarre ritual involving shaking the cucumber between two saucers.
    • Fetting raw egg white on your hands will give you warts. I still have to wash my hands immediately after cracking an egg. [​IMG]
     

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