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First few German lessons to 15/16 y.o. complete beginners?

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by VaniliaGirl, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. Hi everyone,
    I was wondering whether someone could advise me on that. I am used to teaching younger beginners and am a bit nervous about those first few lessons.
    Any ideas/suggestions for how to deal with that kind of public is welcome!
    Many thanks in advance!
     
  2. Hi everyone,
    I was wondering whether someone could advise me on that. I am used to teaching younger beginners and am a bit nervous about those first few lessons.
    Any ideas/suggestions for how to deal with that kind of public is welcome!
    Many thanks in advance!
     
  3. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Actually (and I'm probably going to get shot down in flames here!) I wouldn't be aimimg to dotoo much in the target language.
    I'd try to get some discussion going as to how German will be useful to them, where they can use it in the future etc.
    Then I'd look at some obvious 'cognates' and get them to guess what they mean to 'hook' them in.
    Maybe even move on to use henriette's idea of true/false sentences with actions/visual promps to see what they can follow. Pupils hold thumbs up /down to indicate if they think the correctness of the statement.e.g. Ich heisse . . . . .(pointing to myself), Ich bin . . . . (number card indicating a ridiculous age)and yes I know this i'technically slang and incorrect but for a first introduction!), Ich wohne in . . . .('house visual) with name of place which they'd recognise, and then introduce those phrases and pupils can fill in their own answers for nextlesson when they can introduce themselves.
     
  4. noemie

    noemie Occasional commenter

    The biggest mistake I made when first teaching 15 year olds is to assume that because they'd chosen my subject and they were older, they'd be mature and responsible and I needed to treat them like young adults. In reality they're just a tiny bit older than immature 14 year olds, so make sure you show them and check on them how you want them to be organised - dot the i and cross the t for them!
    I agree with Lara about not too much target language. Praise them when they do something right, it can be very daunting to start a foreign language at that age and they're very conscious of each other. Oh, and my lot absolutely love stickers, even more than their younger peers!
     
  5. Thanks to both of you. I will follow your advice. It's funny how more nervous than usual I am getting with this class!
     
  6. Why don't you try and see how they react if you confront them with TL? In my first Spanish lesson (I didn't know a word) the teacher came in and said: Soy María. Soy de Valencia. Y tú? She did this with every single student, so we had said our first Spanish sentence without actually knowing any Spanish, and this was actually quite motivating, although it wasn't that much. So you could start with everyone introducing themselves. If you use "Mein Name ist..." instead of "ich heiße..." they will even be able to notice how similar the two languages can be.
     
  7. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    [​IMG] Much better than my suggestion.
     

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