1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

First client help needed please!

Discussion in 'Private tutors' started by helenemdee, Aug 22, 2011.

  1. helenemdee

    helenemdee New commenter

    I'm going to talk to a lady about tutoring her two sons on Wednesday (kind of an informal consultation). They are my first clients and I am excited to get started, but since it's my first time, I'm nervous about getting it wrong. I'm going to give them some information about me, and fill in my student information sheets which will tell me where each boy most needs help, talk through my terms (and give them a copy), and hopefully arrange some further sessions! I'm also (hopefully) going to go through some curricular targets appropriate to theie age and find out what they can do and where they could improve (areas to target). Does this sound like good content for the first session?
    Where can I find curricular targets? (or targets along the lines of what they should be able to do by the end of each year group?) Or should I just use the national curriculum programmes of study and assess the extent to which they have reached each target? (One has just finished year 1 and one has just finished year 3).
    And also (this is the biggest question) how do I tutor someone with a lack of motivation/"laziness"? One of the boys is behind at school due to a lack of concentration and I know how to deal with this - tutor in the areas where he most needs to "catch up", providing short bursts of tasks that match his needs and interests. The other, however, has no particular academic weakness but his teachers think he could do better. What can I do to help this student? Any advice (before Wednesday) greatly appreciated!
    Helen x
     
  2. helenemdee

    helenemdee New commenter

    I'm going to talk to a lady about tutoring her two sons on Wednesday (kind of an informal consultation). They are my first clients and I am excited to get started, but since it's my first time, I'm nervous about getting it wrong. I'm going to give them some information about me, and fill in my student information sheets which will tell me where each boy most needs help, talk through my terms (and give them a copy), and hopefully arrange some further sessions! I'm also (hopefully) going to go through some curricular targets appropriate to theie age and find out what they can do and where they could improve (areas to target). Does this sound like good content for the first session?
    Where can I find curricular targets? (or targets along the lines of what they should be able to do by the end of each year group?) Or should I just use the national curriculum programmes of study and assess the extent to which they have reached each target? (One has just finished year 1 and one has just finished year 3).
    And also (this is the biggest question) how do I tutor someone with a lack of motivation/"laziness"? One of the boys is behind at school due to a lack of concentration and I know how to deal with this - tutor in the areas where he most needs to "catch up", providing short bursts of tasks that match his needs and interests. The other, however, has no particular academic weakness but his teachers think he could do better. What can I do to help this student? Any advice (before Wednesday) greatly appreciated!
    Helen x
     
  3. Hi Helen
    My best guess for curricular targets would be to look at the National curriculum levels for the subjects you are looking at... They won't be split up into yearly targets, but since an "average" Y2 should be level 2 ish, and an "average" Y6 should be level 4ish, you can probably get an idea of what they might be expected to have covered (and of course, no child learns everything at the same speed, so they might be level 1 at one aspect, but able to demonstrate level 3 ability in another aspect of the same subject for example).
    With the lack of motivation, it would probably be worth checking that there are no gaps in his knowledge... in case he is covering something up well. Apart from that, I'd suggest giving different types of challenge - puzzle type questions, getting him to work things out for himself - open ended questions, or where he has to combine skills to get to an answer... If you are doing maths, then I'd look at the nrich website for ideas of puzzles - or games (can he work out how to beat you at a game etc?) Maybe codes/ciphers - can he work out how to translate a code without knowing the key?
    I hope some of this helps
    Liz


     
  4. hhhh

    hhhh Lead commenter

    Just use the standard ones you do or did use when you teach/taught in schools (am unsure whether you have given up mainstream teaching). This will be much easier for everyone. If it has been a while and you don't have current knowledge, I would suggest getting in contact with old colleagues.
    With motivation, again use t/l methods as yu would have done in schools, with the advantage you can tailor it as you don't have the ther 28 kids to worry about! Also you don't necessarily have to follow the official structure for lessons as you would when you are teaching in schools, just make sure you do keep records of what you have taught and brief plans.
     
  5. Well you can't fix laziness, it's a personal trait. You can, however, motivate them with their interests. The beauty of 1-1 tuition, is that you can make it all about what they are 'in to'.
     

Share This Page