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Finding appropriate early years stories to read aloud

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by foresta, Dec 29, 2010.

  1. ...agree totally - nor are they lists!
     
  2. The 3way we use the list is that each year group uses the books in the coire list and we do supplement with other stories but we then know that children will have a variety of good quality texts throughout their time in the school and that the same book will not be repeated as a core book in another year group.
    A little pricey i agree but for us someone has done the donkey work for us and it saves us a lot of time!
     
  3. Maybe you need a trip down to your local library. See what versions they have and think about which would work best for your children. I would look for simple texts and colourful and imaginative illustrations. It's also interesting for the children to be able to compare texts of the same story too, so have a few different versions available. Also, as Mz says, it would be a good idea to retell the stories orally, it fits with the genre. Once the children know the traditional version well they will enjoy others, such as 'Prince Cinders' by Babette Cole, which add a modern twist.
     
  4. Of course, if you find a version in which the illustrations are good but the text too complex, you can adlib and tell your own simplified version.
     
  5. inky

    inky Lead commenter



    I'd much rather you'd said that they'd end up with lots of lovely stories under their belts!
    Yes, thumbie, sometimes you hae to simplify a bit. And other times you have to embellish!



     
  6. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    But it is a very, very short list (of nice but not exceptional children's stories) and why not return to/revisit/repeat books? Surely part of growing up is noticing new things about old favourites and reading them on a whole different level of understanding.
     
  7. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I've just bought myself (as in not for school) [​IMG]

     

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