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Film or book or both Lucie Aubrac - Ils partiront dans l'ivresse-occupation topic

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by steveglover, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. steveglover

    steveglover New commenter

    I have been working on the book Ils Partiront dans l'Ivresse by Lucie Aubrac for a couple of weeks preparing vocabulary and exercises on it and finally decided I'd got to watch the film Lucie Aubrac. It brought once again into sharp relief the differences between cinema and literature.
    The book, written in journal style almost day by day, charts the everyday feelings of a pregnant woman, the wartime privations of everyday life (tho' Lucie doesn't seem to suffer too many) and the slow building story of how she works tirelessly to achieve the release of her husband contrast sharply with the film.
    The 121 minutes of the Berri film compress and shoehorn the journal's main events to ensure that the narrative is more or less comprehensible without lots of onscreen "10 days later" etc or voice overs. What the film does do is reward the reader of the book with a "travelogue" of the actual settings in the book which according to IMDB are the real ones so we can see the "ficelle", the funicular railway and the old trams.
    In chopping out the vast majority of the feelings and emotion expressed by Lucie in the book the character is changed totally, I would argue. What am I saying? I guess that there is a lot of value in studying the book and watching the film even if it is only to talk about the differences between them.
    In terms of providing a "cover all" book which would help young people understand the occupation of France I would say it would come high on my list. I guess also the controversy surrounding the Aubracs and , how true to the actual events the book is, lends another level of interest to it.
    The INA link to an interview with the Aubracs is very interesting
    http://www.ina.fr/video/I07345824/temoignage-de-lucie-et-raymond-aubrac.fr.html
     
  2. steveglover

    steveglover New commenter

    I have been working on the book Ils Partiront dans l'Ivresse by Lucie Aubrac for a couple of weeks preparing vocabulary and exercises on it and finally decided I'd got to watch the film Lucie Aubrac. It brought once again into sharp relief the differences between cinema and literature.
    The book, written in journal style almost day by day, charts the everyday feelings of a pregnant woman, the wartime privations of everyday life (tho' Lucie doesn't seem to suffer too many) and the slow building story of how she works tirelessly to achieve the release of her husband contrast sharply with the film.
    The 121 minutes of the Berri film compress and shoehorn the journal's main events to ensure that the narrative is more or less comprehensible without lots of onscreen "10 days later" etc or voice overs. What the film does do is reward the reader of the book with a "travelogue" of the actual settings in the book which according to IMDB are the real ones so we can see the "ficelle", the funicular railway and the old trams.
    In chopping out the vast majority of the feelings and emotion expressed by Lucie in the book the character is changed totally, I would argue. What am I saying? I guess that there is a lot of value in studying the book and watching the film even if it is only to talk about the differences between them.
    In terms of providing a "cover all" book which would help young people understand the occupation of France I would say it would come high on my list. I guess also the controversy surrounding the Aubracs and , how true to the actual events the book is, lends another level of interest to it.
    The INA link to an interview with the Aubracs is very interesting
    http://www.ina.fr/video/I07345824/temoignage-de-lucie-et-raymond-aubrac.fr.html
     

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