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Feeling really sorry for myself!

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by anon3279, Jun 4, 2010.

  1. Haven't posted on here for ages but just wanted to couch opinion if that's ok.
    I've got an underactive thyroid that is playing me up something rotten. I've been taken off my pills for now because the gland appears to be either putting out the hormone or just a bit but is never constant. Can't get the right levels with medication so I'm being referred. Obviously, it's leaving me feeling pretty grim all of the time.
    On top of that, I've got a lump in my boob! Saw the doctor 6 weeks ago and she said to go through another cycle in case it's hormonal. It's still there and quite sore (can't see anything externally - it's inside and the size of a walnut).
    I've got clumsy because of the thyroid and probably because I'm fretting about the lump. Just got back from A & E to have my ankle stitched up because I dropped something on it in the kitchen and have a huge hole on the ankle bone. Sore, bleeding, swollen[​IMG].
    So, what am I posting about then? I think because I'd like to hear from someone who's been through similar things with the thyroid and come out the other end. I'm getting a bit fed up with feeling like I'm dragging my heels all the time.
    Also, the lump... I know that the pain is probably a good sign but...well, it's scary! Seeing the doctor about it again on Monday.

    Sorry it's a long one.
     
  2. Haven't posted on here for ages but just wanted to couch opinion if that's ok.
    I've got an underactive thyroid that is playing me up something rotten. I've been taken off my pills for now because the gland appears to be either putting out the hormone or just a bit but is never constant. Can't get the right levels with medication so I'm being referred. Obviously, it's leaving me feeling pretty grim all of the time.
    On top of that, I've got a lump in my boob! Saw the doctor 6 weeks ago and she said to go through another cycle in case it's hormonal. It's still there and quite sore (can't see anything externally - it's inside and the size of a walnut).
    I've got clumsy because of the thyroid and probably because I'm fretting about the lump. Just got back from A & E to have my ankle stitched up because I dropped something on it in the kitchen and have a huge hole on the ankle bone. Sore, bleeding, swollen[​IMG].
    So, what am I posting about then? I think because I'd like to hear from someone who's been through similar things with the thyroid and come out the other end. I'm getting a bit fed up with feeling like I'm dragging my heels all the time.
    Also, the lump... I know that the pain is probably a good sign but...well, it's scary! Seeing the doctor about it again on Monday.

    Sorry it's a long one.
     
  3. I'm not surprised you are feeling sorry for yourself. That's a lot to contend with. make sure you remind the GP that she's already made you wait 6 weeks, so you'd appreciate a quick referral. It's the uncertainty that must be horrible.
    I know Lily will be along soon, as she has an underactive thyroid too. I did know one woman at work who had it and she took a while to settle too, but once they got it right, she was fine.
    Sounds like you need some TLC.
     
  4. Hi poemee ,
    I am going through lots of tests at the moment too. One of them is for an underactive Thyroid. What you describe is just how I feel.
    I do hope your 'lump' is hormonal.
    I hate the way I feel and want to less of a burden to my husband.
    Sending you lots of hugs and best wishes.
    Kirsi
    xxxx
     
  5. Buntycat- yes, I do feel like I need some TLC! Thanks for your reply, I'll definitely push for an early appointment regarding the lump and I've got private health insurance so might go down that route just to get seen quicker.
    Kirsi - it really is the pits isn't it! I was first diagnosed with an underactive thyroid 19 years ago and for a while (about a year) it was alright but has been up and down since. I've been pushing lately to get it sorted out for good. I wish they'd take the thyroid gland out because at least I could take a set doseage of thyroxine a day and be stable.
    I really hope yours gets sorted out quickly. I'm sure your husband just wants you well and doesn't feel like a burden really. x
     
  6. Please have someone look at your lump sooner than later. I agree with Buntycat, six weeks is too long!
    I suspect that my Immune system is to blame.
    Please let us know how you get on.
    Kirsi
    xxxx
     
  7. The doctor saw it six weeks ago and said it didn't feel like anything sinister (!) because it's mobile and quite soft. I've got to admit that I'd rather it was got out of me rather than keep it there. Probably irrational but I can't help feeling like that. I shall be demanding that something's done when I see her again on Monday.
    As I understand it, the under-functioning thyroid affects the effectiveness of the immune system anyway. When my levels are low I get every stupid little virus going. The GP I used to see, before he retired, suggested taking eccinachea (sp) to boost the immune system. I did for a while then forgot!
    Hope your tests come through quickly.
    Thanks both of you. I actually feel a lot better having got all that off of my chest (so to speak). xx
     
  8. OK. The black hole of thyroids-that-don't-respond-to-thyroxine is apparently sucking in another victim.
    You do need to see an endocrinologist. And you do need to continue with the standard medication. The main issue that they need to resolve is peripheral thyroxine resistance. (The second is dosage.) For some of us there's a double whammy in that thyroxine itself doesn't do the work of nourishing organs and tissues.
    it needs to be broken down in your system. Thyroxine is called T4, as it breaks down in organs or tissues it first moves to T3, then T2 and T1. Apparently various parts of the body need different proportions of each.
    It's entirely possible to have a blood test showing normal levels of thyroxine, but for your body to be suffering from a lack of essential hormone. Think about a car - the petrol tank may be full, but the motor won't work unless the fuel line and the electricals are in a condition to allow the petrol to be used for its intended purpose.
    The way this problem is solved is to be prescribed T3 itself. In Oz this can only be done with a specialist diagnosis and initial prescription - T4 is a cheap standard medication, T3 is a not-so-cheap, specific medication. The other common problem used to be that a significant minority of sufferers had great difficulty getting the right dose. I've not checked since they introduced the rules about refrigerating thyroxine - that % may have declined substantially now that they've finally worked out that it may be cheap but it's not robust in varying temperatures.
    And then of course, there's all the other endocrine functions. Only an endocrinologist or a specialist physician can pursue these avenues.
     
  9. Hang on, just had a thought. You don't drink soy milk do you?
    Apparently unprocessed, unfermented soy products can affect thyroid function. Soy sauce and tofu are OK but not the milk.
     
  10. Goodness Adelady, it sounds more complicated than ever!
    I think that my GP is thinking down the same lines as you and that's why she's referred me now. In all honesty, the GPs I've seen over the years have neither explained nor really bothered about my fluctuating levels and have just prescribed varying levels of thyroxine according to blood test results. Obviously it's not a method that's worked so far.
    I'm going to jot down the key points of your post so that I can question the consultant when I see him/her. Hope that's ok.
    As for soy milk.. no! Try to avoid all soy products actually.
    Thank you [​IMG]
     
  11. I am sorry you feeling down Poeme.
    As Adelady has said, thyroid function is quite complicated and quite often GPs are looking at the wrong aspect of thyroid function and that's why you need to see a specialist.
    I have to say, that as a nurse, I never really got to grips fully with the endocrine system, as it is so complex!
    The very fact that your thyroid isn't functioning properly is likely to leave you feeling very flat, which makes life much more difficult to deal with.
    You need to go back to your GP and ask them to be referred immediately about the breast lump. It probably isn't anything to worry about, but knowing that for sure is better.
    Take care of yourself.
     
  12. mandala1

    mandala1 Occasional commenter

    Hi Poeme

    IMHE breast lump treatment is one of the (few) things the NHS excel spectacularly with. There are well defined routes of treatment and (again IME) if a dr is even slightly suspiciouss then you are there being investigated within days.

    I've a similar lump. Actually lumps! My dr has had a good feel (lovely being a woman, isn't it... :( ) and doesn't think it is worthy of investigation. I have to go back if I am remotely worried.

    I may pay for a private mammogram. But I wonder whether the pain (and it would bloody hurt) is worth it.
     
  13. Hi Mandala
    I've been thinking that the doctor would have got me seen to if she was worried when I saw her but I suppose the fact that it's not gone away and seems a bit bigger is why I'm worrying about it now. I don't really care if what they do hurts - I just want to know definitely if it's sinister or not! I could also go down the private route because my mum pays into Benendon for me and I might do that just to allay my fears (having a tense and worried wife can't be a whole bundle of fun for my husband!).
    Probably the fact that my MiL had breast cancer a few years ago doesn't help my fears either.
    Oh well, only two days until I see the doctor and I'm hoping for something to make me feel less sorry for myself.
    Oh, and thanks doglover (I still think of you with a lower case 'd').
    Whatever foibles this site has, the support given when people need it is just fantastic!
     
  14. mandala1

    mandala1 Occasional commenter

    Go back and get the dr to refer you. Or get done privately. Even if you have to pay for a mammogram - it's £140 I believe. Money well spent, I think.
     
  15. Not much to add Poeme, because like you said, TESSERS are so good at supporting worried people and many are really knowledgeable too.
    I am sure we can all understand your worries re the lump, and they are justified. I hope your GP can alleviate those worries one way or another when you see her.
    I too have had an under active thyroid for many, many years. Once, my pharmacist mentioned when making up my prescription that 300mg of thyroxine was a VERY large dose to take. That sparked warning bells. Apparently it causes the heart to beat quickly/palpitations etc. (I have had heart trouble.) I reduced my dose myself...down to 200mg and I felt exactly the same - ie: OK. When I went for routine blood tests, no mention was made of my needing more thyroxine.
    I think this condition is treated in a rather cavalier manner by some doctors. Bung thyroxine at it and all is well. I told my GP that I'd reduced my dose, and why. Fortunately my condition has remained stable over the years, so I do hope the endocrinologists tests get to the root of your troubles.
    Lily likes slaps, but sending you a hug [​IMG] 'Don't worry' is c.rap advice, isn't it?
     
  16. moonpenny

    moonpenny New commenter

    Hi Poeme,
    I have had an underactive thyroid for about 10 years. I found out just after my daughter was born. I woke up with a panic attack which at the time I didn't know what one of these was as I had never had one before. I was also overheating and getting really bad attacks of hives and feeling really anxious all the time. I know this was strange as you are supposed to go colder, rather than hotter.
    It took ages to get the right dose of thyroxine and I had to keep going back to see the specialist at the hospital as my TSH levels were sky high.
    Once the level is right, you have to keep having regular blood checks. Mine went underactive again about a year ago and they increased my levels of thyroxine. I knew it was doing that as I had been feeling very tired.
    My mood levels are ok at the moment but I do think the thyroid thing has made me more prone to dips in my mood as I have noticed a difference pre and post thyroid trouble.
    I sometimes get really jittery for no reason which I never used to but I have got used to just putting up with it until the feeling passes. When I was still quite ill,I also used to get palpatations and my heart would do a flip thing or do an extra long beat which is quite scary.
    The lump thing must be a real worry. I have had to keep going about one under my arm , which came when I was breastfeeding but apparently there is nothing there to worry about as it is just breast tissue.
    Good luck with sorting both things out. x
    I know most people seem to cope ok with the thyroid thing but I do know someone else who had to give up work for a bit when she had problems with hers. I also know someone else who went totally mental (as in she ended up in a psychiatric unit) when hers went overactive.racing (overactive too) and my ex MIL was really poorly with heart palpatations and losing weight (overactive)
     
  17. The standard GP blood test is a bit of a blunt instrument. There are many processes and chemicals involved in thyroid function and a one-off test won't necessarily identify the reason for an imbalance, so lobbing some Thyroxine at it won't always do the trick. http://www.patient.co.uk/doctor/Thyroid-Function-Tests-(TFTs).htm
    If you aren't feeling any benefit yet - I was transformed within a month but mine was straightforward and common - then a referral to an endocrinologist is the next step. They will identify the precise problem and treat it accordingly.
    I too have a breast lump that was identified by the GP many years ago as "99% certainly a cyst" so best not annoyed with radiation or surgery. It's still in the same spot, still mobile, still round, but getting bigger, as they do.
    But when you have one thing getting you down, everything else seems much worse. Your ankle will get better first. Your lump will be assessed and treated if necessary - they do shift quickly on breast lumps if there's anything sinister suspected - but the thyroid will probably take longer. Underfunctioning thyroids make everything seem lumpen, too much trouble and depressing but remember it's only biochemistry. Take it easy - you aren't making a fuss over nothing, you're running on empty. I hope your referral comes through soon; you'll really feel the effect when they get it right!

     
  18. Wow, Moonpenny! Reading your post has reassurred me that my health problems (thyroid related anyway) aren't that bad. Didn't know that it could get that bad. I'm still coping alright with FT work (head of a busy and large department in a college) and dealing with family things. I do sleep extra specially well though - knackered doesn't even begin to sum things up. Thanks for replying.

    Lilyofthefield, thanks too for your reply. As always you have spoken frankly and wisely - really appreciate that. I think I've been running on empty for so long that when I do get sorted out I'll probably be like Tigger! Looking forward to that.
    I'm see the doctor tomorrow (GP) so will know a bit more then. Sounds daft but I can't wait to get things moving!
    I'm aware that you've got your own health problems, Lilyofthefield, I don't know what to say that doesn't sound a bit trite and c.rappy but I'll send my best wishes to you anyway.
    Onwards and upwards, one step at a time, etc etc for lots of us eh?
    Thanks ladies!
     
  19. moonpenny

    moonpenny New commenter

    Hi Poeme,

    It could be that yours has ben picked up fairly quickly and may well be sorted out without to many complications. I hope so!

    I think mine had been going on for a long time and because I was pregnant, I didn't realise. I also wondered whether post pregnancy my whole bio-chemistry went to pieces for a while.

    I was on maternity leave when it happened and I would say that I felt ok to return to work after the 5 months or so it was and I went back full time with a baby and a toddler to look after as well so I am sure you will be ok.
    My situation was complicated becasue following that I ended up having problems with my job as I went part time after about a year and did a job share which was going great actually.
    When I asked my headteacher to get either time off or to be paid for all the extra days she was asking me to work unpaid, I got into a dispute which I stupidly involved the union in and ended up being quite ill with stress.
    I think the fact that the thyroid had caused me problems previously did not help. Anyway, it took me quite a while to get my life back on track and I think so of the problems I occasionally still have may be a result of these things too. Who knows?
    I hope it all runs smoothly for you. I was worried after I posted that I might have worried you. As I said I know many people here have posted that they have been fine after having thyroid trouble. I mostly fine too now - the daily tablets aren't too much trouble and you get free perscriptions.
    Take care of yourself x

     
  20. The free prescriptions ROCK!
     

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