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Feeling guilty about not taking work home with me

Discussion in 'Primary' started by langywangy, Jan 11, 2012.

  1. langywangy

    langywangy New commenter

    I have recently started a new job and and I'm just finding that I am super stressed. But, actually I think I'm the main problem I feel stressed!!! I just always feel really guilty when I don't do work at home. I arrive at school just after 7.30 and leave about 5.20 in the evening. I usually do a couple of hours on a Sunday. This Christmas holiday I went into school and got my displays sorted and always take marking in with me at lunch time so I would say I work pretty much solidly throughout the day.

    I guess what I'm asking, is whether it is in fact possible to get your school work done in this time frame and are there other people who feel this constant level of guilt and stress over workload?

    Would appreciate any viewpoints on this!!!

    Thanks
     
  2. langywangy

    langywangy New commenter

    I have recently started a new job and and I'm just finding that I am super stressed. But, actually I think I'm the main problem I feel stressed!!! I just always feel really guilty when I don't do work at home. I arrive at school just after 7.30 and leave about 5.20 in the evening. I usually do a couple of hours on a Sunday. This Christmas holiday I went into school and got my displays sorted and always take marking in with me at lunch time so I would say I work pretty much solidly throughout the day.

    I guess what I'm asking, is whether it is in fact possible to get your school work done in this time frame and are there other people who feel this constant level of guilt and stress over workload?

    Would appreciate any viewpoints on this!!!

    Thanks
     
  3. all_heart

    all_heart New commenter

    Some days I have no work to take home, other days I feel like I have loads (depends on if I taught literacy that needs marking!) I sometimes think of all the work I do at home, evenings and weekends, and holidays and think do I need to do all this - teachers have the problem(?) of being able to work 24/7 and still not getting everything done as we like everything to be lovely and perfect. I think that's what makes us teachers as we have the patience to do all the things that make a difference for the children. But I'm learning (and need to work harder at this) to think Okay, 'will it make a difference to the children if i do this?' 'does all my marking mean anything to the children who are 5 and can't read my comments - can I put time aside to verbally mark and children mark own maths etc...' 'do I spend too much time at work chatting, when I could be working for that time and having less/none to do at home?'
    I do feel guilty not taking anything home, but if you have good time management and good schools systems e.g. assessment sheets that are worthwhile but not lengthy, it is possible. I need to work on time management I think.

    Good luck,and any time ideas people write on here for you I'll be nabbing!
     
  4. carriecat10

    carriecat10 Established commenter Community helper

    The way you have organised your time sounds quite similar to me. Sometimes I find I just need to take a break at lunchtime or at the end of the day and then this can have an impact on my systems, but generally this arrangement works for me as I prefer not to take anything home.
    I like to get things sorted for the next day before going home and then spend any time the following morning marking books or updating paperwork etc.
    I also spend a day every holiday sorting out my displays, filing, tidying etc.
    I also know that other teachers do things very differently but it's horses for courses ... some prefer to arrive later, leave earlier and take stuff home. This worked better for me when my children were younger and needed me at home.
    Working longer doesn't mean you are doing anything better. Sometimes, I find that the longer I have the more I go round in circles ...
    Remember that work/life balance?
    Carrie [​IMG]
     
  5. Yes, many of us feel like you do. I've been doing the job since the late 1997 so it is not because you are an NQT.
    I take bags of work home, get to work by 7.45 and stay until the cleaners have left at 5.30. I do work each evening. I also work on the weekend and can be almost evil if my Sunday is interupted by people wanting to spend to time with me - which is shameful. I don't know how people work less hours and I certainly don't understand how some people can take no work home in the evening.
    However I rarely do really well in monitoring sessions so I must be doing something wrong !!!.
    This job takes what time you willl give it !!.
    However bare this in mind. I did 5 years of supply and some of it short notice which means work wasn't left. I mananged to teach the children with out an evening of advance planning.
    Even now, some of my best lessons have been adhoc. I am not saying I go in totally cold but sometimes I just look at the objective and let things take their course without thinking of SEN, MAT, ICT and the relevant colour codes that make the planning look like a paint by numbers even though their needs are met.
    It would be a brave head to say that they didn't want excessive weekly/daily/lesson plans or what is the norm for their school but would drop in during lessons instead.
    Be a worthwhile experiment for say a term and one I would like to take part in.
     
  6. langywangy

    langywangy New commenter

    Thanks all, it so is about making it manageable. I think it doesn't help in teaching when you get goody goodies going on about doing gazillion hours per week on some of the other threads on this website and puts me into ultimate panic mode!
    I admire teachers who have the confidence to say that they don't take any work home with them and can prove that they are successful at their job. I also think that if you're tired how can you use your time productively when you are in school.

    It annoys me that teachers have to justify why they don't take work home with them, what other careers would you get this!!!!?

    Thanks once again everyone. I'ts helped me put things into perspective a little more!!
     
  7. I agree that I find it very hard not to take work home after years of doing it but when I got passed over for the permanent post I had been doing on a temporary basis for 2 years it made me rethink my work life balance. Slogging my guts out after school every evening made not one jot of difference, I decided that I cannot work harder so I need to work smarter!!
    Less chatting with other staff unless it relates directly to the children
    Displays are now left to my TA and I try not to mind when they don't quite look how I had planned
    Marking with the children and only directly related to the success criteria (which had been proven to have more impact on progress anyway) Our marking code includes a 'v' for verbal feedback and then I make bullet point notes as it's not for the children to necessarily read.
    A stamp for home/school link books to show that children have read, I only comment if essential
    APP folders set up ready to put evidence into straight away
    Lesson resources recycled where possible
    One day in school in the holidays to organise and tidy the classroom
    Train the children to be tidy!! (I have Reception and it works!!)
    Limit my time on TES (tehehe)
    Now all I need to do is resist the urge to work at home!!
     
  8. ROSIEGIRL

    ROSIEGIRL Senior commenter

    Do what works <u>for you</u>.
    Work to live, not vice versa.

     
  9. Wow, depressing. Not being funny but what sort of a life is this? I spend a couple of hours on the weeking preparing ALL of my lessons onto notebook...I do all my marking in free periods (I work internationally)...and am out of the school at 4pm at the latest. I won't take work home. But I guess this is a lifestyle choice. Oh, and I'm considered a very good teacher by my peers and boss.
     
  10. nick909

    nick909 Star commenter

    This is pretty much what happens in our school. I'm very happy with this arrangement.
     
  11. Hiya,
    When I started teaching I carried lots of work home, but on a time-management course they recommended us not to, on the basis, that if you didn't get it done, you felt guilty; both a literal and figurative load home and back again! Since then I have always tried to get done what I can AT THE SCHOOL (albeit that it takes me a while!), and then home is NOT WORK. This would be my "Top Tip" for anyone in teaching. Of course there are times when you will have to make an exception (reports always beat me), but generally it helps my mental health!
    Best of luck! It does get easier.
    PS Another top tip from the same course was to have a drawer or tray to put all those documents in that you're not sure how to deal with, rather than have to keep shuffling them round your desk. Being something of a ditherer, this one is a keeper for me as well.
     
  12. I think that just highlights how the difference in timetables for secondary and primary mean that teachers have totally different work practices! Free periods would help us all!
     

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