1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Feeling fed up and upset

Discussion in 'Primary' started by thedancingqueen, May 23, 2011.

  1. I doubt I am. I used to photocopy things at school last year on placement but this just made me feel guilty when I was keeping teachers waiting to use the photocopier on a morning. That's why I bought myself a bulky office printer with a scanner and I can print a set of worksheets off really quickly. It makes me a less stressed if I know I'm going to school with everything ready.
     
  2. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Funnily enough, I'm just finishing my 15th year of teaching and my HT told me the other day that to really get on into leadership in our school, I need to develop a thicker skin.

    Actually, now I think of it, I was snivelling in his office about a rubbish lesson observation (not from him) that was unfair and inaccurate, but still stands. We have all been there...a month of pretty perfect lessons, one observation and it all goes pear shaped. (I think it is called 'sod's law!)

    You will just have to pick yourself up and get on with it. There isn't anything else much you can do. No-one will go back and change the lesson for you. No-one will change the judgement. Take a deep breath and stop worrying. You will be fine in the end.
     
  3. I know that feeling minnieminx. I really messed up in a lesson observaton recently and was pretty devastated after the feedback (nobody likes the dreaded 'I' word). Had to pick myself up and move on the next day though. I have good feedback from parents, my children have made good progress and I genuinely believe I have a happy classroom.
    Things go wrong and sh*t happens. It is how you move on from it that counts.
     
  4. i like this. Not the fact that things go wrong but the fact that it's what you take from it which is important and I will keep this in mind. I am feeling a lot better, I am going to act on the feedback and I'll not let the whole thing get in the way of the rest of my teaching this week. All of the support and advice means a lot so thank you!
     
  5. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Hiya,

    I only read the first post and just wanted to say, don't let it get you down! When I did my PGCE, my 'mentor' from University came to visit me and among other things told me "I needed a kick up the backside" and "I shouldn't be on this course" "Why was I doing this when it didn't suit me?" and other such things. At the time it made me feel like ****!! I even remember my in school mentor wrote me down in my report because I arrived at school at 8:15 instead of 8:00 as she did, even though I had to drive nearly 30 miles and pick up 2 other students on my way.

    However, despite all of that, I have been teaching for nearly 4 years and have been rated as good to outstanding in every observation since, i've never been short of work and have excellent references. It just goes to show that what they think isn't really important in the long run. If you believe in yourself and know you're good at what you do, stick to that. A 1/2 hour observation is NOT a true indication of how good a teacher you are!!
     
  6. P.S After reading your post about organisation.....If that is what they call unorganised I dread to think what they would say about me!! I don't have a filing system, I have a piling system and a few children with the role of my personal assistants to find the stuff I'm always losing!
     
  7. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I was devastated when the stupid observer spent the entire feedback telling me that I really shouldn't need to be doing revision and should be 'brave' enough to just carry on teaching. This was the week immediately before SATs and I have year 6. It was a practical lesson and the children were enjoying it, but yes it was clearly much needed revision. I was furious that she didn't judge my teaching or their learning at all, just lectured me about not doing revision. I was too shocked to argue and was trying hard not to just cry.

    I was pointless and a nuisance and now I actually have in my possession a lesson observation that says stupid satisfactory at the top. Never, ever had one before. The written feedback is inaccurate and ambiguous and the HT did add notes to some of it for me, but couldn't change the judgement.

    I'm still sulking three weeks later, but yes you do just have to move on and think positively.
     
  8. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    My post was in response to pinkflipflop, but others type faster than me!

    I have a piling system as well!
     
  9. This is really encouraging. Thank you! I hope that a few years down the line, I'll have a similar story to tell!
     
  10. razziegyp

    razziegyp New commenter

    You and me both Pinkflipflop.....my children despair of me......
     
  11. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    Yes! Lol. My classroom is covered in 'Piles' yet I know where most of the stuff is... except the stuff I lose. I give out more house points for finding my board remote than anything else! lol!
     
  12. Just some general advise that I give my students, an im sure dancingqueen would now agree with, and that is 'never start something new on observation day' it really is as simple as that. You know when your observation is going to be so make sure you work up to it, lay the foundations in the couple of lessons leading up to it, do the revision of the stuff you will be teaching, ensure that you get to the point you think they need to be before the lesson starts. That way you can show through the lesson that you have spent 10 hours planning all the things that make you a brilliant teacher.

    Hope all goes well in the rest of your placement Dq.
     
  13. Do you know what? I've had days like yours. I think everyone has had days like yours, where they question what they are doing so wrong. Just remember that you're also doing many, many things right.
    I had a terrible observation once and felt truly crappy, questioning whether I would ever be good enough. Then, the following day a girl in my class bought me a 'project' she had been working on for me at home. It was a hand made envelope full of drawings which would make me smile if I was sad after I left the school on my teaching practice.
    Little things eh?
    Don't worry, you will be fine.
     
  14. Thank you, dancingqueen. I'll ditto Jools and say I've had this same experience - and after many years of teaching experience. At the time it set me into a depressive cycle which I found very hard to break. Seeing the same experiences from others has helped me realise that I am not alone in feeling down (even now one year later!). Chin up and keep smiling. Try to remember that observation lessons are just a hoop-jumping experience and not reflective of your ability as a teacher.
     
  15. Just to add my voice to others above...
    At the beginning of my 5th year in teaching (and only the second week of being in a new single form entry yr group), I had a really disappointing Ofsted lesson which me feeling crushed and like I'd let not only myself down but also the school. Back in the classroom the next day, I had a really good morning's teaching and no-one dropped in - typical!
    I have been told by many colleagues over the years that I am too hard on myself, so to an extent pinkflipflop is right by saying 'try to develop a thicker skin'. The trick is to get things in perspective. I am woefully poor at this (there I go again, putting myself down!) but I do have 3 thoughts which may help with this:
    1) To help myself to calm down before lesson obs, I remind myself that the children enjoy lessons & coming to school, parents seem happy (or at least satisfied) and I have a good track record of children making good progress (this will come when you have your own class, I'm sure!). These 3 things are all far more important than a snapshot of your teaching in one specific hour.
    2) When during my PGCE I was asked to think back and remember my own days at primary school, I could remember some fun teachers (who gave out mints and read stories that completely had me mesmorised) and some key experiences (residentials, sports days, making windmills). However, I could not remember a SINGLE individual maths or literacy lesson. Try it yourself! Your own teachers had blips and off days - even the ones you remember as being fab. Everyone does - you are bound to as well. It's how you bounce back that's the key! To this day, I still believe our most crucial job as teachers is to give the children a love of learning...and if they're working on things at home, you're clearly doing that!
    3) In our school, we have several posters that say "I've learnt so much from my mistakes, I'm thinking of making a few more". We all know that children learn by making mistakes - and then learning from them. If anything, we encourage this by trying to create a culture of 'It's OK to have a go' within our classrooms. Sure, if a child keeps making the same mistake over and over and over, we might ask questions then. But the first time they have a gamble and it doesn't pay off, we are happy to give them opportunities to correct errors and move on up. The same is true for you here - you're a learner too! If someone never makes any mistakes, it's probably because they never take a gamble - and if they never take a gamble, they'll never know if it might pay off.

    Next year, it looks like I'm moving to a different key stage (rather reluctantly it must be said!) and am dreading things like observations, as I know there's bound to be lots of 'constructive feedback' for me to take onboard - and like you, I find that hard to hear. But am hoping keeping thoughts like this in the back of my mind will help me to stay confident and positive. Because that's the sort of learners I will be trying to develop in my classroom - confident and positive!

    Oh and please tell me I misunderstood - are you printing class sets of worksheets out at home??! No school would expect you to outlay the costs for this. If poss, maybe after half term, try to get yourself a day ahead so you can photocopy things the evening before at school (never managed it myself on placement but good luck to you!!)
     

Share This Page