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Feeling a bit saddened by teaching tonight!

Discussion in 'Personal' started by 5klass, Mar 6, 2012.

  1. Aah - could have written this myself. And don't forget the PE and the drama and the music, not to mention doing poetry just for the excitement of playing with words, not merely to learn the difference between a simile and a metaphor!
     
  2. Your post makes me so glad I no longer teach. Was secondary but all the joy went out of it with unrealistic targets. The thought that primary pupils have such a levels driven curriculum is dispiriting.
     
  3. Captain Obvious

    Captain Obvious New commenter

    I fully expect to live in a world one day with very literate, very numerate but entirely ineffective people.
    We're losing sight of teaching about life...and perhaps more importantly (if SMT want to get "educational") how to apply literacy and numeracy skills.
     
  4. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I was in Y6 (junior 4 in those days) in 1968-69. I was taught by the deputy head, who also specialised in PE and was a decent pianist, too.
    In those days, we spent a lot of time on English and maths. There was a good deal of rote learning, an awful lot of writing and the doing of sums, but we did get a weekly afternoon for art and craft and one for swimming. History, geography and RE were very literacy-based.
    BUT - at any given moment, our teacher (who had filled the classroom with animals - a hamster, various reptiles, fish, etc that we all had a part in caring for) would say, 'Let's go over to the gym and play basketball' (insert 'on the field and play shinty, rounders, etc') or he'd suddenly say 'That's enough work - what we need is a bit of singing, children' and he'd sit at the piano and we'd do that for half an hour.
    He could, because although the curriculum was a lot more 'desk-driven', he had the freedom to be spontaneous. And we loved it.
     
  5. PlymouthMaid

    PlymouthMaid Occasional commenter

    I no longer teach in a school or have school aged children but I think it would be so tragic to no longer have the experiences of growing seeds, singing, being arty etc. By all means combine as much maths and english as possible into these activities but make sure that children are still experiencing as much as possible not least because many have barely any experiences in their home lives. It may not matter for children who spend time with family at weekends in the garden, doinn craft or art activiites or going to visit places and things but for the others it is an window of opportunity into a world of possiblities that we must not close. Maths and English are terribly important (and I am a Basic Skills teacher who sees poor lit and num all day every day in young adults who have only recently left school) but we dont want to make it so dull that all piupils grow to hate the subjects and switch off altogether. Make it useful and fun and make sure the pupils understand how to do the maths and english needed and can see the point of it all.
     
  6. lillipad

    lillipad New commenter

    One of th saddest things in my class is that I have a little boy who doesn't excel in either lit or num, he finds both hard, but yet anything geographical he finds fascinating and loves looking at maps and talking about different countries and places, and for me, the idea of removing geography is just heart breaking with the effect it could have on him... And this feeling that the children should produce something (I.e a piece of writing) when actually, I could happily let my class spend a lesson pouring over maps and discussing them just because it is interesting... Seems sad to me it has to be in the umbrella of lit or num and we can't just learn just for the sake of giving them a broad range of interests!
     
  7. bedingfield

    bedingfield New commenter

    All of the above posts have some echoes of the way I am feeling at the moment.
    My current school is scruntinising every part of the curriculum and observing at the drop of a hat. It is totally demoralising for the teachers, who would like to be left alone to teach and is preventing children receiving a range of academic and life skills because everyone is having to teach by the rule of SMT/LA advisors.
    I love it when I'm teaching subjects such as science or geography and you see that light bulb moment from the children who suddenly understand a concept. That's when I like to take the opportunity and expand that particular area, but lately I am conscious of the need to follow the plan and get on to the next part. Heaven forbid that my class should be a day behind my partner class and not sticking to the plans.
    I have only been teaching for four years and already I am feeling that I need to get out before the non-teaching SMT/LA advisors totally drain me of enthusiasm for anything. I love it when I can teach things my way (not in a prescriptive way) and I am told that I am a good teacher. However, I wonder whether I should have stuck to life in an office...
    Very saddening.
     
  8. mfd1, I'm wondering where you teach and whether you teach my daughter. She's come back today full of the joys of making Gingerbread men, and everything they had to do to make them.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Am at a special school. Today didn't quite go according to plan....egg on the floor not in the bowl, flour all over me not in the bowl....and no man shaped cutters to be found. Still, we did squares, stars and circles and had a fantastic time. My class are still calling them our 'gingerbread men'! I'm glad someone else, somewhere, had as much fun as we did this morning! [​IMG]
     
  10. Sound like fun. I've worked in a special school and attempted many wonderful things, especially like skills related, like wallpapering and baking.
    My daughter is in y2 and had a great time.
     
  11. *life* skills

     

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