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Fatty chicken

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by cosmos, Aug 3, 2011.

  1. Yet again I find myself trimming off what seems an absurd amount of fat from organic free range chicken thighs. Battery ones I could understand as they get no exercise and are pumped up with lord knows what - but organic free range?
    I thought the whole idea was that they got plenty of exercise and an unadulterated diet.
    I've a good mind to complain to sainsburys.
     
  2. Yet again I find myself trimming off what seems an absurd amount of fat from organic free range chicken thighs. Battery ones I could understand as they get no exercise and are pumped up with lord knows what - but organic free range?
    I thought the whole idea was that they got plenty of exercise and an unadulterated diet.
    I've a good mind to complain to sainsburys.
     
  3. It's normal, cosmos.
    They get fed differently too!
    We bake ours on a trivet, skin side down, and allow all the fat to fall off! Or BBQ it on the grill so the fat falls through.
    Our neighbours grow the occasional meat birds and they are always more fatty than we expect.
     
  4. Oh ok then, I won't make a fuss. I've been using them for a very long time now rather than battery hens and each time I am surprised at the fat. It just doesn't seem right!
     
  5. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    I don't mind it to be honest. I like to add spuds to the roasting pan, or roast on a trivet, as Pobble does, and collect it to keep in the fridge for roasting spuds in in future.
    For casseroles I usually cook with the fat and skin on and remove the skin and skim the fat off at the end. I do sometimes trim them too, though.
     
  6. The battys are fed quick grow food designed to make them gain weight quickly - the meat (as you probably know, sorry) is injected with water to make it look plump.
    Free range are often fed the same. But organic FRs are fed more corn and other fat containing foods, though not always. It makes them far healthier, as with humans, it means they can utilise more vitamins and minerals - which we then eat!
     

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