1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Father of knife victim appeals to teachers to help tackle the crime

Discussion in 'Education news' started by TES_Rosaline, Nov 14, 2019.

  1. TES_Rosaline

    TES_Rosaline Administrator Staff Member

    Mark Brindley’s son James was killed in a knife attack in a quiet village near Birmingham. He believes the problem is widespread thinks there are three ways teachers can help with this issue:

    ‘Mr Brindley said: “Certain teaching professionals think that if they’re in schools that are in middle-class areas with nice young children who are well-behaved that they don’t have an issue – but I say, 'If you believe that you’re burying your head in the sand.'

    “The issue is not restricted to deprivation or to money or social class. It’s everywhere and affects everybody, so don’t let anybody tell you otherwise.”’

    https://www.tes.com/news/watch-3-things-teachers-can-do-tackle-knife-crime
     
  2. moscowbore

    moscowbore Lead commenter

    So what does he expect teachers to do?
     
    tonymars likes this.
  3. Weald56

    Weald56 Established commenter


    The article mentioned by the OP says this:

    "Speaking to Tes, Mr Brindley said the steps teachers could take to help tackle knife crime included:

    1. Think long term
    Look at long-term interventions within school, so there is something embedded in the PSHE curriculum, rather than a one-hit intervention.

    2. Respond to local issues
    Discuss local issues in assemblies to raise awareness of violent crime and knife crime. If an incident happens in your area, talk about it.

    3. Tap into outside knowledge
    Invite experts from schemes like the Full Circle Programme into school to raise awareness about knife crime, and talk to pupils".
     
    alexmurraybrown likes this.
  4. Jamvic

    Jamvic Lead commenter


    Campaign against knife crime

    Speaking to Tes, Mr Brindley said the steps teachers could take to help tackle knife crime included:

    1. Think long term
    Look at long-term interventions within school, so there is something embedded in the PSHE curriculum, rather than a one-hit intervention.

    2. Respond to local issues
    Discuss local issues in assemblies to raise awareness of violent crime and knife crime. If an incident happens in your area, talk about it.

    3. Tap into outside knowledge
    Invite experts from schemes like the Full Circle Programme into school to raise awareness about knife crime, and talk to pupils.

    The average classroom teacher would have no control over approving any of those things.
     
  5. moscowbore

    moscowbore Lead commenter

    Teachers can do none of these.
    I have some sympathy for the father but he is talking about social work. Teachers do not do interventions to prevent knife crime.
     
  6. eljefeb90

    eljefeb90 Senior commenter

    I don't want to criticise a grieving father who is trying to find solutions, but, under the current régime, resources and support at all levels for pupils with difficult backgrounds or emotional problems has been slashed. From learning support and classroom assistants to CAMHS , the support networks have either disappeared or are under severe pressure. The only priority that really counts is results. Stress and fear of failure with all the concomitant monitoring leads to a feeling of constant pressure on both time and mental health. Young people do not feel supported or safe. Help and interventions are not available early enough for troubled youngsters .Join the dots, folks, rising knife crime isn't down to schools and teachers and they are in no position to solve it.
     
  7. moscowbore

    moscowbore Lead commenter

    I feel more and more that because teenagers are conveniently grouped together in a school, that is the place to solve all of society's problems. So now teachers are supposed to be mental health nurses, teaching kids how to brush their teeth, tackle increasing knife crime .....

    None of this is in the job description of a teacher and shouldnt be. Hire other people to do this other stuff and do it in schools if you wish. Leave the teachers to teach.
     
    Sally006, Jamvic and gainly like this.
  8. Corvuscorax

    Corvuscorax Star commenter

    exactly what good do you think that would do?
     
  9. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    Not really. They are all things that teachers could in principle do. They aren't social work stuff. And surely some schools do already do some of this? The issue is whether schools have the time and resources and how effective it would be....

    Surely when he says 'teachers' in this context he means schools as institutions - "the teaching profession"? Not that individual classroom teachers should initiate it without reference to anyone else.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2019
    corgie11 and bajan like this.
  10. Corvuscorax

    Corvuscorax Star commenter

    Most schools talk about crime in PSHE, many schools have assemblies and outside speakers on knife crime.

    I really don't think this has much of an impact.

    Sure, there may be one or two pupils who reconsider carrying a knife in the light of these "interventions" and choose not to.

    Equally there may be one or two who had never considered carrying a knife UNTIL these "interventions" and then choose to do it.

    Most will just carry on as they were before.

    We are here to impart academic knowledge. We have no role in crime prevention, except crime actually in our classrooms in front of us.

    The best way we can help our pupils avoid a life of crime is to support them in getting high grades that will enable them to have more choices in their lives.

    I'm not against the assemblies, and PSHE lessons, but realistically basic safety advice is more or less all we can do, or is our role to do, and that doesn't always work, clearly.
     
    corgie11 and Jamvic like this.
  11. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    I don't believe even Gove thought that was the only purpose of schools.
     
  12. Corvuscorax

    Corvuscorax Star commenter

    That is our actual job
     
  13. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    Educating pupils is a teacher's job. Imparting academic knowledge is the major part of that, but not the sole part.
     
    corgie11 and Stiltskin like this.
  14. moscowbore

    moscowbore Lead commenter

    I feel you are missing the point.

    The clue is in the job title. Teacher.

    I have no interest whatsoever in including tackling knife crime as part of my job. I have no problem whatsoever with someone coming into school and tackling knife crime. So long as it does not affect teaching, which is the primary purpose of a school.

    As I said earlier, schools conveniently group teenagers together in one place so it is possible to speak to a load of them at the same time.

    This is social work.
     
    Jamvic likes this.
  15. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    No, you are missing my point. The OP article is talking about what schools could do, not what individual classroom teachers should do. At least one of the 3 suggestions expressly says it's about inviting in outside experts.

    Arguing about which specific individual has what in their job description simply avoids the question being posed by TES, which is what role schools should have in reducing knife crime by their pupils?

    Why do you want to dump it onto social workers? Surely dealing with knife crime is primarily the police's responsibility? It's not social work.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2019
    corgie11 likes this.
  16. Jamvic

    Jamvic Lead commenter

    Ask Mr Brindley, they’re all his ideas.
     
  17. Jamvic

    Jamvic Lead commenter

    Don’t know, you’d have to ask him.
     
  18. Jamvic

    Jamvic Lead commenter

    This.
     
    CWadd likes this.
  19. circuskevin

    circuskevin Occasional commenter

    I wonder if @Rott Weiler has ever been a teacher?

    If not what sort of jobs has he done?

    Kevin
     
  20. bessiesmith2

    bessiesmith2 New commenter

    Helping students to consider moral issues must come into the remit of a school. It is important that when they grow up students are able to assess the merits of our current social structures, political institutions and laws in order to effect change as necessary. Of course part of this will come from family background but in the same way that some families teach their children to read and write, we cannot take it for granted that all families will do this and do it well.

    Having said that, I don't think devoting a section of your maths or music curriculum to the study of knife crime is an appropriate solution - but I don't think this is what is being proposed. School leaders will need to consider whether / how assemblies, PSHE, tutor time or small, targeted group discussions might lead to students reconsidering whether to carry a knife.
     
    Jamvic likes this.

Share This Page