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Falsified paperwork

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by frannysing, Jun 2, 2012.

  1. I was recently aksed to fill out paperwork for a pupil who has extremely complex learning, behavioural and social needs.
    He shows no progression, cannot read or write and is unable to complete the lowest level of Unit Awards in Literacy or Numeracy.

    I completed my assessment of the pupil but I was told, in a staff meeting, that it was not acceptible to write 'the truth' in the report, as basically the pupil is a good meal ticket for the school.

    My HT told me that the paperwork was changed (so that it looked better for the local authorities) It still has my name on it.


    I guess this sort of thing goes on in most SEN/EBD schools, or does it?



     
  2. I was recently aksed to fill out paperwork for a pupil who has extremely complex learning, behavioural and social needs.
    He shows no progression, cannot read or write and is unable to complete the lowest level of Unit Awards in Literacy or Numeracy.

    I completed my assessment of the pupil but I was told, in a staff meeting, that it was not acceptible to write 'the truth' in the report, as basically the pupil is a good meal ticket for the school.

    My HT told me that the paperwork was changed (so that it looked better for the local authorities) It still has my name on it.


    I guess this sort of thing goes on in most SEN/EBD schools, or does it?



     
  3. I'm guessing the school needs or rather wants to show progress so that same level of funding may continue.As an ex SENCO and having served as a LA SEN Officer, I understand that the LA demands to see value for money and will dig for evidence that everything is being done for the child or young person concerned. If, as you say, no progress or attainment of any sort is being seen then the school would have to justify sustaining level of funding provided or seek additional resources.
    Paperwork falsification is not uncommon in mainstream either, in my experience. In fact, the unofficial practice of bumping up scores is encouraged from year to year so that progression is shown, even at the expense of the receiving teacher or school. But in mainstream, the worse the case, the better the funding, so it is in our interest to highlight a lack of progression and attainment for our SEN registered children. We all know that a progression of 1.75 levels per annum is expected of all pupils but I can cite several cases where this was not happening at all and some pupils had made NO progress over several years. This was not being shared with the LA and the teachers responsible were not hounded either but supported in the cover up. I feel sorry for Secondary educators who have to pick up the pieces.
    I would suggest you talk to your union representative regarding your name being tagged to falsified data. It is both immoral and unreasonable for your head to expect you to swallow this practice willingly. Why can't headteachers stand up for what is right instead of looking at the bottom line. Practices like this will never change if they all accept the current criteria for funding or seek ways to circumnavigate the system and retain funding without making the most of it for the pupil and staff concerned.
     
  4. It certainly does not happen in my special school.

    I have known of some mainstream schools where it could but that doesn't make it okay. The question you have to ask is whether it's serving the child's best interests and reflecting the true situation. There's a difference between portraying the correct data in the best possible light and simply falsifying it. I would not be happy with this and I agree you may want to talk to your union for advice re the best way to tackle this. You have to continue working with these people so need to maintain your working relationship. However, you need to maintain your integrity too and keep a good conscience.
     
  5. No, it doesn't and I'm not happy about the situation.
    I have made this statement in meetings. I am not shy to express myself.
    By tackling, do you mean whistle blowing?
    There in lies the rub.
    Hence the reason I am so concerned and annoyed about it.
    It's obviously not reflecting the true situation, however the pupil does benefit from other lessons in the school: D & T and Cookery. He has also been at the school for five years and is now sixteen. The school have also secured funding for him until he is nineteen.
    However the fact that he is unable to read or write or count or perform in any other subject does not seem to be of concern to anyone in management.

     
  6. You could probably be disciplined for not completing the report but you could not be disciplined (fairly at least) for upholding the professional standards for teachers. Do it accurately and be prepared to back up your assessments with evidence. Then there's nothing they can say to you.

    Frannysing - I get the impression you think I'm criticising you. On the contrary, I was trying to say I agree with you and confirming the reasons behind your concerns. I don't know if that makes sense.
     
  7. RamC

    RamC New commenter

    I took on my current role in September and was shocked as an innocent NQT the discrepancy between recorded and actual achievements of my class of pupils with PMLD. I think in my school it seems to be a combination of poor training on assessment techniques combined with pressure on expected levels of progress. Either way, I have reassessed my class and given them new, (mostly lower but some higher), levels. The difference for the pupils is that now I can truly track their progress and show true learning is taking place in the smallest increments, whereas before their achievements were not celebrated because their paperwork was not accurately set.

    Partly this is a problem because the Gvt have not got sufficient evidence to provide for SEN pupils, especially those working at P levels. P levels were never designed to be used to moderate pupils, only to track individual progress, and the lack of progression guidance based on any evidence is shocking. Being told that a pupil working at P2i at 16yrs old should progress one level per key stage is ridiculous, for example. That pupil will be making progress, but in an individual way that might not be reflected by a P level.
     

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