1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

failing NQT

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by lauravs, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. Dear James and all,

    I'm writing on behalf of my boyfriend, David. He is in his NQT year second term and was told last term that he was likely to fail (because of his bad behaviour management). It was also mentioned to him by another (more senior) teacher that it would be better to leave at Easter than fail in the summer and his head of faculty has said that had David had a different mentor in his first term they wouldn't be in this situation.

    He has changed mentors this term and head of faculty has said that she expects him to be on track by Easter. However, to do so David has been given so much extra work to do (supposedly to make up for the lack of help and support last term) and consequently is knackered and feeling unenthusiastic about passing. The advice he's being given now doesn't seem all that helpful either. He wants to follow this teacher's advice and leave by Easter (before if possible as she suggests would be). However, his observations have all been quite positive and he's improving. I think he'd make a good teacher (once his classroom management is sorted out and has gained more confidence in himself) and that he'd enjoy it. I think he should find the strength to carry on, but he says he has lost his enthusiasm (and, I think, confidence) to pass that he just wants to get out. He's talked about changing career completely, or trying independent schools. I believe it's the school who have let him down in their support. It's also our old school, where we know quite a few of the teachers, but there is a high turn-around of teachers in his faculty) He enjoyed his PGCE placement schools so would like him to try a different school - but how easy is it to get a job having left somewhere not having completed the NQT? I've heard it's hard for schools to fail NQT students, part of me thinks he should stick it out, but the school's not making him happy.
    Any thoughts would be most welcome.

    Thanks,
    Laura

     
  2. Dear James and all,

    I'm writing on behalf of my boyfriend, David. He is in his NQT year second term and was told last term that he was likely to fail (because of his bad behaviour management). It was also mentioned to him by another (more senior) teacher that it would be better to leave at Easter than fail in the summer and his head of faculty has said that had David had a different mentor in his first term they wouldn't be in this situation.

    He has changed mentors this term and head of faculty has said that she expects him to be on track by Easter. However, to do so David has been given so much extra work to do (supposedly to make up for the lack of help and support last term) and consequently is knackered and feeling unenthusiastic about passing. The advice he's being given now doesn't seem all that helpful either. He wants to follow this teacher's advice and leave by Easter (before if possible as she suggests would be). However, his observations have all been quite positive and he's improving. I think he'd make a good teacher (once his classroom management is sorted out and has gained more confidence in himself) and that he'd enjoy it. I think he should find the strength to carry on, but he says he has lost his enthusiasm (and, I think, confidence) to pass that he just wants to get out. He's talked about changing career completely, or trying independent schools. I believe it's the school who have let him down in their support. It's also our old school, where we know quite a few of the teachers, but there is a high turn-around of teachers in his faculty) He enjoyed his PGCE placement schools so would like him to try a different school - but how easy is it to get a job having left somewhere not having completed the NQT? I've heard it's hard for schools to fail NQT students, part of me thinks he should stick it out, but the school's not making him happy.
    Any thoughts would be most welcome.

    Thanks,
    Laura

     
  3. Tell him to be very wary of the "Performance Management" means of getting someone to make the right choice. What I'm saying is that if a department don't like someone or there is any sort of friction, they can't get rid of you. However, they can make you get rid of yourself.

    This is usually done by performance management. I once heard a HOD refer to it as "We put the thumb on 'em and they make the right decision for all of us". Pick something, turn up the thumbscrews, reassess, pick something else. Stress will soon be followed by genuine incompetence and a self-fulfilling prophecy.


    I know people will say "Ooooh, you can't say that, it's awful, teachers are such nurturing individuals who would never do something so awful as that". Well, I've seen it happen as a supply and in schools I've worked in. It is of course constructive dismissal, but it's the way it often works in schools. You'll see unlikely characters who are useless not getting "the thumb" and you'll see perfectly good individuals getting "the thumb". It pays to take a step back and look at the relationships going on in a school/dept and see if this is the case.


    It could be that he's just ****. However be aware of "the thumb" and know that it's antidote is being able to demonstrate your capability via your markbook.
     
  4. Captain Obvious

    Captain Obvious New commenter

    The key thing is that he passes the third assessment. I "failed" two assessments and resigned at the stage that meant I left at the end of the academic year to avoid the third term counting.
    If your boyfriend is likely to pass the 2nd assessment, it would seem like a good idea to stay on, particularly if it's likely to mean a pass overall.
    While it was a high stakes gamble in my case (ultimately I had one term to prove myself in a new school, thankfully after some supply "practice"), it can pay off if he finds the right school or going into a school ensuring the same mistakes aren't made.
    Leaving at Easter is the safer option, but that means weighing up the chances of passing this term, getting a new job and being able to complete the NQT year somewhere new.
     
  5. Any pass or fail happens at teh end of the third term and not during term 1 and 2. If there are issues (which there seem to be) then the resolution must come from both sides, the NQT needs to work at rectifying the problems, but the school must also provide support not just 'more work, more observation and more pressure'. So there should be targets that are SMART, specific measurable, achievable, realistic and time related (yes there are otrher ways of interpreting SMART). Alongside these there should be success criteria so that your BF knows when he is meeting the targets. Induction should also be seen holistically, that is it should be evidence based and not just on the observations - so ideally he should have a portfolio of evidence that shows how he is meeting the standards. The school should also call in the LA adviser to help if there are issues and that shouldbe part of the support package.
    I would also advise that he talks to his union rep about all that has been going on and ask for advise on how to proceed, if things do not go well, he will need support from his union.
    James
     

Share This Page