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Facebook photos

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by dozymare1957, Mar 17, 2012.

  1. dozymare1957

    dozymare1957 Occasional commenter

    A child took a photo of me in class and has posted it on Facebook. Apparently the other kids in the photo also have it on their Facebook page and some people who I know have seen it and told me about it. I'm upset by this as I do not want my picture on Facebook but don't know my legal rights. Any help or advice please?
     
  2. sleepyhead

    sleepyhead New commenter

    Forget the facebook bit of this for a moment - they took a photo of you in class? Speak to your mentor and HoY about this part of the issue. It's totally unacceptable.
    Then deal with the facebook issue. You need to find the photo and then ask them to take it down.
     
  3. dozymare1957

    dozymare1957 Occasional commenter

    Thank you for the advice. I've been in touch with my mentor but nothing can be done until next week because of the weekend. I don't have Facebook so I can't find the photo. Someone else told me that it was there.
     
  4. Schools that I work with would all find this unacceptable and the pupilshould be ordered to take it down by the school. Many schools have policies that forbid pupils from taking photos in class or that require permission to be sought from the teacher for educational purposes (e.g. a photo of a poster or experiment or perhaps a finished dish in food tech. Report this to the Uni and get them behind you in geting this photo removed and the pupil disciplined (also others who have spread the photo).
    The Sage
     
  5. This puzzles me. There are still two days before the weekend! This should be dealt with swiftly and firmly. Have you spoken to the school about it?
     
  6. Probably a bit late now, but Facebook themselves do allow you to report content that is bullying or harassing in nature even if you don't have an account:

    http://www.facebook.com/help/report/without-account

    You could try this.
     
  7. This is ridiculous. The pupils should be in the head's office right away and parents informed as this is a serious issue.
    Aside from anything else, if the reverse happened and you were posting pics of kids on facebook, you'd be out of a job straight away!
     
  8. Hello,

    A similar incident occurred in my placement school on Friday.
    A pupil took a photo of the Headteacher running in the playground without his knowledge, and posted it to Facebook.

    In his address to pupils he said that he had taken legal advice and that it was an offence to do this ( posting to a public domain without consent is seen as a breach of Data Protection Act). As such, he advised pupils that he would involve the Police if it happened again. Perhaps more experienced Teachers could confirm this?

    The school is in Scotland, so obviously governed by Scots Law therefore there may well be differences concerning Scots / English law in such cases.

    The Headteacher was swift and categorical in his address to pupils, and had demanded removal of the pictures and contacted parents. Maybe in your case, the school will be better placed to support you rather than the University.
     
  9. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    To my knowledge, there is no breach of the Data Protection Act by a student taking a picture of a teacher and posting it online...
     
  10. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    That is a very different scenario...
     
  11. I agree with everyone else, it is clearly unacceptable!
    For next time, even if you don't have facebook, you could have asked the people who told you they saw your picture to locate whose profile it was on and to give you the name of the pupil(s). Via one of your friends account, you could then take a photo of the screen showing your photo on a pupils' facebook page and then report it to the school with evidence.

    You are not in the wrong here so be confident and push until you get some results and recognition of the matter.
    It needs to be resolved, as if the pupils know or think they can push their luck they will continue to do so. That is the nature of teenagers. So as someone else was saying, swift and firm.

    I just looked at the date, I am clearly late in this conversation, so I hope that you managed to resolve your issue.

    Best.
     
  12. Crowbob

    Crowbob Established commenter

    Could you explain what this act is and how it is applicable in the UK?
    Generally, it is not true.

     
  13. Just for the record, we had a similar problem with pupils posting pics of other pupils & staff on facebook. When those responsible were identified they were warned the police could be called ( as a message of how serious the issue was) and then suspended for 5 days. Your SMT need to take swift & serious action, especially to send a message to the other pupils.
     
  14. All the posters so far say that this is unacceptable. Why is that?
    Teaching in Thailand (as I do) you will find that students in governent schools will often use cameras in class and they will post the photos on FB. They will also take photos at school events like sports days and field trips and post those to FB. Students will also use mobile phones and other recording devices (such as hand held video cameras) in class to make copies of lessons - often to play them back and make notes later. The schools actively encourage this behaviour as the students enjoy it, it builds team spirit in class, helps bonding & it also helps the students to learn. Students learn better when learning is fun.
    Seldom have I found it a distraction in class and I get a buzz from seeing that the students like my lessons enough to want to post pictures of them for their friends to see on FB. If you have nothing to hide you have nothing to worry about.
    I know others teaching in Thailand who feel the same way. I guess it just shows how attitudes differ in different societies and cultures in different parts of the world.
     
  15. I assume it's because the teacher in question is clearly concerned about the image and the way in which it has been used. Perhaps the student has posted the image in a humiliating way. I have seen this happen before, more than once.

    Maybe the image is harmless.

    I can understand the concern, however, because if the intent is to humiliate (cleavage/backside etc) a few days of leaving it up there is a long time for fb users.

    If it were me I would ask the informant: Who's account is it on? What is the content of the image (ie. How does it represent me?) If the image is harmless, I would make a point of having the student ask my permission first, as that is the courteous thing to do. If the image is offensive (with crude comments/embarrassing image) I would take it to the Head immediately with the students name, so we could arrange to have it taken down that very day.

    Unfortunately in the UK and in Australia, students see fb as an effective bullying tool, so it doesn't surprise me when I hear stories like this, as opposed to the students in South East Asia.
     

  16. Maybe the image is harmless.

    I can understand the
    concern, however, because if the intent is to humiliate
    (cleavage/backside etc) a few days of leaving it up there is a long time
    for fb users.

    If it were me I would ask the informant:
    Who's account is it on? What is the content of the image (ie. How does
    it represent me?) If the image is harmless, I would make a point of
    having the student ask my permission first, as that is the courteous
    thing to do. If the image is offensive (with crude comments/embarrassing
    image) I would take it to the Head immediately with the students name,
    so we could arrange to have it taken down that very day.

    However, I think it would be worthwhile to examine why you are feeling so upset, if it is just an inoffensive picture of you teaching. Think about the group that you are teaching - if they are nice kids, then maybe let them keep it there. If they tend to be disrespectful, then get it taken down...as other users can comment and they may say nasty things, which would be unhelpful for your relationship with that cohort.
     
  17. Hi, I had a similar incident with some students naming and swearing about teachers on facebook. I met with the students to discuss this issue and told them it was against the law to slander others. Shortly into the interview, the school business manager knocked and poked her head in the door (wearing her telephone headset) and said, "Excuse me Miss, I have the Australian Federal Police on the phone, what do you want me to tell them?"
    Within minutes the offending parties had vowed to remove all inappropriate postings....
    I don't care what country you are from or what school you are in - kids know the difference between right and wrong and a little bit of bluffing goes a long way.....
     
  18. I think that its not so much the photo that causes concern but the lack of consent,
    I did the group 1 metals prac with my year 11 group, they asked if they could film it on their phones and put it online to show their friends, which I said was fine
    however a student from my year 10 class took a photo of me and said they would post it on facebook to their friends, i then found out and told the pupil that if it was posted to facebook then i would refer them to their HOY as i did not consent to the photo being taken or being posted
    you must also consider the fact that some pupils are not allowed to have their photos available to the public (some children in care for example), so it must be stressed to the students that regardless of who the photo is of it shouldnt be put online without consent
     
  19. The comments saying it is illegal to take photos without consent etc. are nonsense. In fact the person that takes a photo OWNS the photo and so from a legal perspective you would actually have to request the owner to delete it.

    Schools and local authorities may have their own guidelines in place - but this is not the same as law.

    If the photo is offensive (for whatever reason) begin by simply asking the student that took it to remove it. If that fails take it up with the school.

    The issue of consent in the previous comment isn't strictly true either. It is good practice to obtain permission to PUBLISH (not take) photos of children (and sometimes adults). Sometimes it is good practice to ensure children cannot be personally identified (by name/location) where their photos are published (for children/families at risk) but again this isn't generally a LEGAL requirement.

    Legally you are at the mercy of the copyright holder (the photographer) and the places the photo is published (Facebook). You can try to affect influence over those via polite requests/threats etc. etc. The only realistic way you could take legal action is if it were to be considered harassment.
     
  20. Guaranteed if you go to London and take photos of specific buildings in public, and look suspicious as you are doing it you will be arrested under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act.
    Additionally, taking photographs (or filming) in public with intent to publish without consent to an audience is actually against the law as it breaches privacy laws (in the UK, we rely on the European Court of Human Rights to enforce this). The Human Rights laws guarantee a "right to respect for privacy and family life" as the clause goes.
    The laws are similar to those regarding CCTV. You don't own the use-rights to use the faces of other people. Copyright doesn't apply. (I'm a CCTV Data Controller so while I can't confess to know all of it, I know enough to help my colleagues out in our school!)
     

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