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Facebook Hate Page - advice?

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by RaymondSoltysek, Mar 19, 2011.

  1. "it sounds like you are perhaps not the sort of reflective practitioner that I hoped you might become."
    Aside of me having to deal with the crushing disappointment of not reaching your lofty standards, I was wondering if you could clarify further on this, rather vague, statement?
    "But I am glad the student is now more successful in her learning;"
    Me too.
    "that you appear to take credit for this occuring"
    Again, another ambiguous statement, phrased in a way which isn't quite accurate. It should read part of the credit, as I was part of a team which ultimately helped get her back on track. Myself as her the form tutor, her subject teachers and school the behaviour management policy as implemented by the SLT all had a role to play. Do you disagree with this?
    "as a result of your involvement last year is an interesting observation."
    'Interesting' in what way? Once more, you state something in a vague and inconclusive manner. Are you suggesting my involvement didn't impact on her improved behaviour? Would you care to expand on your statement?
    Many thanks
     
  2. I entirely sympathize with her, vehar, but that's not a denial of freedom of speech but, as I've been amazed and contemptuous to discover from many threads in the Forum, of the readiness and ability of Heads to bully their staff with impunity. However, that's another matter, about which I've posted many times. She must have been identifiable from her blog. I don't know how the actions you describe could result in the sack, if legally challenged, but I also gather from posts that teachers now get little support from colleagues and are reluctant to call in their Union's lawyers. We now warn students about the possible career drawbacks of what they post on Facebook, but they're still free to do it.

    On the other hand, the idea that grown-ups, and teachers to boot, feel they are being "bullied" by pupils/students I find very strange. How can they produce the emotional state that real bullying, of the defenceless by the powerful, produces? More and more, these Forum threads make me wonder why people become or remain teachers nowadays. They don't express much respect for, but often antagonism towards, their charges. Yet they've not long left school (many posters are clearly in their early years in teaching) and know what goes on there.

    I started teaching when pupils expected to sit and work and, in fact, would make it known if they got sloppy teaching, and I moved into Tertiary thirty years ago when I realised that it was the only way to be sure of having only students who wanted to be there and of not having to concern myself with other aspects of their lives. I took early retirement a decade ago. There is no way I would go into school-teaching now at any price and probably not into FE, as there also the prime or sole aim is no longer to maximize a student's progress towards competence in my subjects. There are, after all, many other (more than when I graduated) ways to earn a living, equally interesting and without all the emotional baggage that mixing with children now seems to send you home with.
     
  3. Thanks to you too, Campamania. I'm afraid I don't have time to get into a lot of detail, but my thoughts were that a lot of young people go through difficulties where there relationship with others - friends, parents, teachers, society at large - can be troublesome for them. For some, as for the young person you describe, matters improve and their learning benefits. There can be many causes for this improvement, but there is little evidence than an authoritarian punitive approach by the adults in the young person's life is a positive factor, but this is what you seem to assume when you say, "I followed the school behaviour management policy and ultimately it worked." I hope that gives you an idea of the issues I would want to review in respect of your analysis of the situation, but my apologies, I really don't have the time to go into it further.
    In passing, I am also a little confused as to some of your contributions. You say you are currently an NQT, but were dealing with this matter as a form tutor a year ago? And you describe your committed involvement on behaviour management matters here, but the other day in another thread you wrote:
    "The only way I have made it this far is by deliberately resticting what I
    did/attempted to do - i.e. not volunteering for anything I didnt need
    to do, letting the odd minor behavioural issue slide so that I could go
    home on time and get some sleep. The positive is (apparently) little
    stress suffered by me, but at the cost of my development being a little
    slower than I would otherwise have liked - I am still playing catch up
    with some behavioural issues. My fellow NQTs are probably slightly ahead
    of the game compared to me, but do all seem to be a whisker away from
    cracking up due to stress."
    Perhaps I am misreading in some way, but there seems to be some inconsistency in your contributions.
     
  4. 'She must have been identifiable from her blog. I don't know how the actions you describe could result in the sack, if legally challenged'
    It's an ongoing case in America.... but it won't be long until something similar happens here. And everywhere.

    'On the other hand, the idea that grown-ups, and teachers to boot, feel they are being "bullied" by pupils/students I find very strange. How can they produce the emotional state that real bullying, of the defenceless by the powerful, produces?'
    ANYONE, of any age, if subjected to daily abuse (and the way so many kids behave these days IS abuse, no matter how it's glossed over) will feel emotionally battered, hopeless and without recourse, as you yourself have observed from many contributions to this forum. A teacher is just ONE person, faced by a mob of up to thirty people. If anyone comes back with the 'But YOU're the adult, they're just CHILDREN' excuse, all I can say is, tell THEM that! So many children these days expect to be treated like adults, but hide behind their age when the consequences of their behaviour catches up with them. Teachers DO feel pretty powerless in today's classrooms.

    'There is no way I would go into school-teaching now at any price and probably not into FE, as there also the prime or sole aim is no longer to maximize a student's progress towards competence in my subjects'
    So many of us feel that way, and there are still a lot of young people around who are idealistic enough to feel the same. But you're right; it's getting harder and harder to find a reasonable environment in which one can just do a good job, any more. And there aren't really as many career options around as you might think. Anyway, that's a survival strategy; it doesn't tackle the problem: what's happened to make the classroom intolerable to so many people? Not just teachers; it's a misery for the kids you describe too, the ones who WANT to learn.


     
  5. 'when the consequences of their behaviour catch up with them.'
    Where's the 'edit' button?
     
  6. Hi,


    Personally I would take option B. As I agree it will only fuel the fire and possibly have a detrimental effect on your current relationship, with the pupils involved...Although option D, could be slightly more rewarding!!
     
  7. Hi all
    Thanks again for all your helpful feedback and thoughts :)
    Just to update:
    The girl in question spent a day in isolation with the assistant headteacher with a phonecall home to her parents. I have recieved a verbal apology from her and am due to recieve one in writing too. She seems to have realised the seriousness of what she has done and seems genuinely regretful. The group has also been removed from Facebook.
    I have made it clear to her that no grudges will be held by me, and I consider it a clean slate, helped by the fact the group was set up in a fit of a tantrum rather any actual malicious intentions. The students who joined the group were also spoken to by the assistant headteacher and have all come and apologised. It seems they didn't really know what the group was or were unaware they were members! Seeing as I have had no previous disagreements with these students, I am happy to accept their apologies and move on!
    Cheers folks!
     
  8. This is true. It would be teaching a good lesson to let her realize the implications of a momentary fit of anger printed off in cyberspace. We tell our students not write anything down in paper that they would not want to see publicized on the front page of the newspaper.
    I guess we should ammend that to facebook as well. She should have a taste of the embarrassment of knowing that the SLT has found the page. Her group members should understand what it means to endorse a statement that could spell trouble some day.
    I don't think that this is serious since it has been inactive for a year, but I do feel she should be warned against such behavior. Against a teacher, you say it is not bullying, but what if it is against a peer? Is is bullying then?
    And in another context, it could be libel and she could be in a heap of trouble for her "Hissy Fit"
    Should she not have the opportunity to learn from a small mistake?
    It is much more painful to learn from our grand mistakes.
     
  9. garyconyers

    garyconyers New commenter

    There is no absolute right to freedom of speech. Article 10 of the Human Rights Act gives a qualified right of expression, assuming no slander/ libel/ obscenity/ harassment laws are broken. But it's a qualified right - ie it has conditions. I have explained this to pupils who claim they have a right to 'freedom of speech'. (I say, for example, they are protected in law from people telling repeated nasty lies about them). This makes sense to them.
    When you say 'freedom of speech' do you believe that children should be 'free' to say anything about their teachers without sanction? Including job-threatening lies? I doubt that, just making a point.


    Hope this helps.
     
  10. garyconyers

    garyconyers New commenter

    I know - hence the part of my post you missed out.....
    "When you say 'freedom of speech' do you believe that children should be 'free' to say anything about their teachers without sanction? Including job-threatening lies? I doubt that, just making a point."
    Sorry my reply offended you so much. I was replying to what I assumed was your idea that freedom of speech should be maintained. I got this idea from what you said:

    " You think teachers should be calling the police in because someone has written something about them that they don't like? What happened to freedom of speech?"



    I got tired of hearing pupils in my classes claiming their right to 'freedom of speech'. My answer to you, that it doesn't really fully exist, is what I said to them. Apologies if you were aware of what the HRA actually states. You didn't seem to be from what you said in post 40. You seemed to be arguing that not letting children say exactly what they wanted equates to book-burning, thought-policing and mind-control. Hence my reply.

    I agree with what you said to me in reply post 57, BTW.
     
  11. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    Result!
     

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