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EYFS -not a level playing field?

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by aquiesce, Jun 17, 2011.

  1. I would be interested to know why the ofsted inspection process for the private sector appears to be more rigorous than in schools? Schools are 'allowed 'to have lovely displays done mostly by TAs, use topics, have much more adult led learning, poor regard for anything but the education side? In the private sector it is expected tha it is done to the letter. Why, if the EYFS is supposed to provide equality of learning/care? Just confused, that's all, as a qualified teacher working in both settings and can't understand why provision is so different. Any thoughts?

     
  2. I would be interested to know why the ofsted inspection process for the private sector appears to be more rigorous than in schools? Schools are 'allowed 'to have lovely displays done mostly by TAs, use topics, have much more adult led learning, poor regard for anything but the education side? In the private sector it is expected tha it is done to the letter. Why, if the EYFS is supposed to provide equality of learning/care? Just confused, that's all, as a qualified teacher working in both settings and can't understand why provision is so different. Any thoughts?

     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Who says?
     
  4. newso

    newso New commenter

    Doesn't describe my setting.

     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    perhaps you shouldn't make generalisations based on your experience oftwo inspections ..
     
  6. But inspections should be the same for both settings as both settings follow EYFS. And that is especially true of safeguarding measures such as the ones quoted. If inspections don't have to be consistent it undermines the whole process.

     
  7. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    In my experience (4 inspections) they are all different anyway. The inspection we nearly had in December (cancelled due to snow) wanted different paperwork to the one we eventually had in March.
     
  8. So that's more evidence that the process is flawed.
     
  9. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Inspections aren't even the same for the same setting. One team will love what you do the next will hate it and a 3rd will have a different set of preferences...so unless the same group of people visit every setting there are always going to be inconsistencies.

     
  10. Message for Inky - How do you like new 'edit' button? Will this cramp your spontaneity? [​IMG]
     
  11. Exactly. And is anyone doing anything about it? About time for a research project.

     
  12. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Inspectors have a set of criteria but they also have personal baggage that unfortunately will influence judgements.
    For what it's worth the inspection in the PVI day care supported by my friend was a much lighter touch than that in the school nursery where she teaches which was inspected only a matter of weeks earlier. (by a different team)
     
  13. Yes, but is it fair for Ofsted inspectors to bring their personal baggage? They are trained and should be professional. If they are not, the whole system is flawed. And yet this is a system that declares schools to be failing, destroys careers and undermines mental health.

     
  14. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    eh????
     
  15. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Some people believe Ofsted inspectors are human and as such will have personal baggage as we all do and no it isn't fair but how do you ensure people aren't influenced by their own experiences/expectations/expertise (or lack of)?
     
  16. The answer to this is - you don't ensure it , because that is not possible. But you should acknowledge the 'baggage' and admit to the intrinsic lack of objectivity in the domain of school inspections. Then there might be progress made towards a more cooperative, discussion-based and advisory inspection format.
     
  17. Not InkyP, Inky.

     
  18. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    We had such a system it was called HMI
    but I would also say most teachers unfortunately don't challenge Ofsted who do actually listen if you question their baggage.
     
  19. Well, the point is, that teachers should not have to challenge OFSTED, because the process should be fair without being influenced by something as contingent as the teacher's inclination to question and challenge. What you are saying actually highlights the injustices, doesn't it?
     
  20. I'm not saying we should not challenge OFSTED. But, when the ethos of the system is so dictatorial and while OFSTED is so powerful, it has to be seen as totally objective. Of course, OFSTED inspectors are human beings, schools are run by human beings and children are human beings, so inspections cannot live up to their necessity to be totally objective. It's the contradiction inherent in this which shows the system up for what it is.
     

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