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Extra work during detention

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by kfw_88, Apr 24, 2013.

  1. I am a student teacher and recently issued a detention for which I prepared extra work for the pupil to complete, I also made sure we discussed the reasons for the detention. However, once the pupil had left I was told by his usual teacher that I shouldn't give extra work. When I asked why I was told it was not something she did. I felt that extra work gave more depth to the detention rather than the pupils sitting in silence pretending to reflect on their behaviour. I double checked the schools behaviour and discipline policy and extra work is listed as a sanction so why did I feel that I had done wrong?! I look forward to hearing your opinion(s) on this. Thank you
     
  2. I am a student teacher and recently issued a detention for which I prepared extra work for the pupil to complete, I also made sure we discussed the reasons for the detention. However, once the pupil had left I was told by his usual teacher that I shouldn't give extra work. When I asked why I was told it was not something she did. I felt that extra work gave more depth to the detention rather than the pupils sitting in silence pretending to reflect on their behaviour. I double checked the schools behaviour and discipline policy and extra work is listed as a sanction so why did I feel that I had done wrong?! I look forward to hearing your opinion(s) on this. Thank you
     
  3. you felt wrong because the 'usual teacher' made you feel wrong. You're inexperienced, they're not, the default position will be to question your own practice, because that is what student teachers - rightly - do.
    However, I think you were probably in the right - without knowing all the ins and outs. Sitting doing nothing is a spectacular waste of everybody's time, it keeps the kid occupied, they may well benefit from improved understanding by the end of it, it backs up the school's policy on B&D and just because the usual teacher doesn't do it (and there are many reasons why they could be doing that, and many reasons why they may be wrong to not be doing it...) it doesn't mean you have to follow their decision.
    Finally - YOU issued the detention - YOU manage the time that the pupil spends with you.
    Good call as far as I can tell on the info given.
     
    bonxie and pepper5 like this.
  4. Much appreciated - thank you!
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  5. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    A problem with giving extra work is...

    YOU have to mark it!

    So the detention isn't just a sanction for the kid, you get punished as well.

    Once you're giving 3 or 4 detentions a day, perhaps even per lesson, as you may have to do to establish your authority in any new school you teach in, you'll want there to be as little effort on your part as possible and their "depth" will be the least of your worries.
     
    bonxie and pepper5 like this.
  6. Fair point - thank you!

    May I ask what you have pupils do during detention please? Is it effective?

    I need all the advice I can get so appreciate your comments very much, thanks.
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  7. Always make them do something academic.

    She's a s** teacher.

    The best private schools, setting work fr detention is standard
    Yes I read it.
    Do I mark it? no do i ***.



    something like; explain something in 40 lines or something.

    Either about work they haven't done.
    or about what they did wrong "40 lines explaining why it is important not to be late for Physics lessons"
     
  8. If you can't be ***** to do the detention... 40 lines written for 9am next morning. If they miss it. they do it during detention.
     
  9. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    Anything they're not likely to enjoy.
    Nothing is effective at first - the kids take time to work out that it's easier to behave than to have the consequences of not behaving and, as you may be the only person in their lives trying to teach them that it may take a long time.
    It's about who gives in first. If you have supportive management, it will be the kids. If your management start asking why you're setting lots of detentions, then the kids will win and you should be looking for a job in another school.
     
    pepper5 and (deleted member) like this.
  10. [/quote]
    Anything they're not likely to enjoy.
     
  11. I don't set academic work in detention as I don't want my subject percieved as punishment (rather than assomething that is inherently worthy).
    I would set a piece of writing on why they are there.
    And I probably wouldn't read it, much less mark it.
     
    pepper5 and dunnocks like this.
  12. dcn33

    dcn33 New commenter

    Good idea
     
  13. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    I agree about not using my subject as a punishment, Also not making the detention into extra work for me.
     
  14. saluki

    saluki Lead commenter

    Back in the twentieth century we only had detentions for two things: lateness and not wearing our school hat! There was no such thing as poor behaviour in my school. Truth.
    We were given a really boring essay to copy out - either on the history of timepieces and the importance of punctuality or on the history of headwear.
    My offspring only had one detention during their entire school career. I believe it was a trumped up charge and the detention was used getting coursework for that particular teacher up to date. Not a bad idea for students who are reaching coursework deadlines and are not up to date.
     
  15. pepper5

    pepper5 Star commenter

    Writing about why they are there is a grand idea.. They could also write about why it is important to to!!ow instructions, stay in task, and work without disturbing others.

    Anything to make them think about what they have done and what they need to do to put things right.

    Sitting in silence without a task to do is a waste of everyone's time.
     
  16. Flere-Imsaho

    Flere-Imsaho Star commenter

    So are most detention tasks.

    The problem with setting valuable work (aside from the subject becoming a punishment) is that it can end up being extra tuition rather than a punishment and some kids (the ones starved of interaction act home) end up actively seeking out the time with you by deliberately behaving badly.

    I find kids are a bit like dogs - the sanction has to be immediate and it's very rare than reflection two days later actually brings about any real change in attitude or behaviour. I waste their time in detention and I'm quite open that I am doing so, usually pointing out that their behaviour in class caused my time and that of the whole class to be wasted. that tends to stop any cries of how unfair it is.

    I find a passage in a random book and make them copy it with all the punctuation and capitals precisely as printed. Drives 'em crazy. Rarely see them twice.
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  17. rustyfeathers

    rustyfeathers Occasional commenter

    Detention 1: a discussion in which I confirm the pupil knows what they did wrong and what to do next time to avoid detentions, including asking for help with behaviour and work. (eg. "open your planner if you want to move from a distraction" for the kid afraid to lose face).
    Detention 2 onward: a letter of apology or an explanation of what the pupil did to land themselves in detention.

    Work ONLY if the detention is due to insufficient work. Otherwise I fear they'll come to see my subject as a punishment (or seek out detentions if they like the subject!)

    I'd have found this rather interesting!
     
  18. Findlotte

    Findlotte Established commenter

    By giving them work during the detention you're telling the students that they can misbehave and still catch up on the work.

    I get mine to write lines, then ask them to rip it up. It's a time waster, but that's what they get for wasting mine.
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  19. kirstybeebee

    kirstybeebee New commenter

     
    border_walker and pepper5 like this.
  20. kirstybeebee

    kirstybeebee New commenter

    I've only just joined tes so just seen your post. I was aware that some teachers still give pupils written work to do in detentions such as an essay or copying but I wasn't aware of any teachers who still give out lines to write. It's interesting that you ask them to tear up the lines after they've written them. I've come across teachers who tear up the written work themselves (I can remember this from my own days at school) but never a teacher who asks the pupils to tear up their own work! What is their reaction when you ask them to tear up their written lines?
     

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