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Extra curricular music clubs - no commitment!

Discussion in 'Music' started by frazzy, Jan 21, 2011.

  1. I have started back up 2 extra curricular music clubs this week and after an amazing Christmas concert a number of students have decided to 'quit' some telling me others just dropping out.
    One club is drumming and another is singing. I just wondered if anyone had any ideas how to keep the students coming each week - we have a competition to aim for and also a concert in May. I thought being that it was cold they would appreciate being in the warm for half an hour a week.
    I'm getting a bit upset about it and don't know what to do - am I the only one with this problem? it seems I'm putting all the hard work in and nothings coming out of it!
    Help!
     
  2. I have started back up 2 extra curricular music clubs this week and after an amazing Christmas concert a number of students have decided to 'quit' some telling me others just dropping out.
    One club is drumming and another is singing. I just wondered if anyone had any ideas how to keep the students coming each week - we have a competition to aim for and also a concert in May. I thought being that it was cold they would appreciate being in the warm for half an hour a week.
    I'm getting a bit upset about it and don't know what to do - am I the only one with this problem? it seems I'm putting all the hard work in and nothings coming out of it!
    Help!
     
  3. felicitycornish

    felicitycornish New commenter

    Can you get to the bottom of why they are quitting? Is it because they don't like the songs that have been chosen? Is it because they're frustrated they haven't been able to sing a solo? Is it too difficult for them? I would try talking to some of the ones who want to quit and trying to get to the bottom of what the problem is, then you're more able to address it!
     
  4. You will never keep all kids in all clubs forever. They drop in, they drop out. Sometimes it's other clubs setting up at the same day (usually sport or ICT), sometimes it's just they prefer to go home and watch telly after school, or value their lunchtime playtime more! There is always some fall out, however great you make a music club. You could ask why they are dropping out, but I'd put more effort into another recruitment drive to recruit new ones, you'll always probably have a decent, reliable 'core' group. I used to make a fuss about quitting but I don't get my knickers in a twist about it any more. (But I still don't let them use that word! I always say something to the effect, "You are not allowed to use the work 'quit'. You are not quitting, you are not a quitter! But, you may leave for now and you have the right to change your mind at any time - and I hope you will!" Sometimes they do, sometimes they don't!)
     
  5. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    Very often this sort of thing happens because one or two people with strong personas decide to quit, for whatever reason, and then others (following the overwhelming desire of most kids to conform to their peers) follow suit.
    Are there any strong characters that you could involve in planning, saying that if only we could get another x number of pupils along, we could do this or that ... could you help in planning and recruitment? They may well respect the trust and responsibility, and help considerably.
    I recall that some time in the mid 1980s, we had a similar problem with losing lower voices in the chapel choir. The captain of the school's first rugger team had a good voice (in fact, he went on to become an opera singer!) and after discussing the situation, he'd signed up the entire team. It was a bit raucous at first, and some dropped out, but we ended up with something like 6 new basses and 3 new tenors, and I was told that the singing of rugby songs in the changing rooms had perked up no end!
     
  6. I have to agree with Fran on this one. You will never win them all and Ive found particularly with African Drumming that some pupils will go on and on and others will work very for a term and then move on to the next experience which is not neccessarily a bad thing.
    One of my best singers left choir at the end of last year. The reason - he was absolutley warn out attending clubs in and out of school and I fully appreciated he needed a break. This year my number are slightly down in choir but they go up and down and to be honest its easier when there are less kids.
    Some years I have had drop out and when questioned the kids have admitted they didnt like all the songs. But others did and theres no pleasing everybody. I try and take account of requests and ask for suggestions for repertoire though it never ceases to amaze me how much children enjoy the mix of traditional, classic and modern material.
     
  7. Why do children do etra curricular activities? How many reasons can you think of? Why did they come to start with? Did the group live up to their expectations? Only you can answer these questions however I can tell you that this experience is shared by hundreds of music teachers every year.
    In my school I now audition our choir and our orchestra, and I only have a limited number of places. Students now compete to get in and once they have earned a place they really value it - my rehearsal attenedence is much better than last year because of this. We also award merit points for each rehearsal attended. We DO take a register and I do follow up, on an informal basis, when students don't attend. Students who miss a number of rehearsals are not allowed to do the concert.
    Oh, and we have parties.
     

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