1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Extension tasks

Discussion in 'Secondary' started by reb2g08, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. Hi there,
    I have been setting extension tasks for the students to be completing if they finish their practical experiments early (science). It is to stretch the students with higher ability, but it seems they would rather just pretend that they are taking ages to do the practical than finish early and get on with it.
    What can I do to get the higher ability students to want to do the extension task to stretch and challenge them?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Hi there,
    I have been setting extension tasks for the students to be completing if they finish their practical experiments early (science). It is to stretch the students with higher ability, but it seems they would rather just pretend that they are taking ages to do the practical than finish early and get on with it.
    What can I do to get the higher ability students to want to do the extension task to stretch and challenge them?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  3. paulie86

    paulie86 New commenter

    Emotional blackmail, those who are happy to get a level 4/5 be as slow as you want, those of you who want to improve and get a 5/6/7 need to be getting on with the extension tasks. Used to work for me, I only taught yr7&8 though, so don't know how it would work with older kids.
     
  4. barneystinson

    barneystinson New commenter

    That is the biggest problem with extention tasks, the kids quickly realise taking longer on the main task will mean less work.
    So you have to either use emotional blackmail as already mentioned, or bribery.
    The problem with emotional blackmail is that it will wear off very quicky.
    Depending on the Year group, you can issue very cheap prizes to those who complete the extention tasks. A colleague of mine used to give Year 7 students small stickers which the pupils went nuts over.
    But obviously you can adapt it however you like.
     
  5. bigpedro

    bigpedro New commenter

    The students need to see the benefit in everything they do. Its not enough to simply want to be the best anymore, they want so see how it will help them to do something or get somewhere.
    Kids are wise to extension tasks as you've mentioned but only if they see them as pointless things to keep them busy (which despite best efforts is the way kids think). Is there a way to make them think that doing the extension tasks will improve their level or even... controversially... extend the actual tasks rather than add extras to them.
    Otherwise, i'd go with prizes - simple but effective
     
  6. bigpedro

    bigpedro New commenter

    It doesn't especially once they know their entry requirements for college. I've had 10 students come to me this week wanting to "drop tech" because they only need 5 Bs to get into college and they'll get them with Science, English and Maths. You can sometimes get the same effect with kids lower down when taking options. "im not doing Geography next year so why should I try" (fair point and all that, but not really what we're after)
     

Share This Page