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Extended Writing?

Discussion in 'English' started by ericastill, Apr 4, 2012.

  1. Hi everyone,

    I'm an American teacher looking for a job here and I've just been invited to an interview. I've been asked to teach a lesson and the only instruction I was given is "Using a stimulus of your choice plan a 30 minute lesson to develop an aspect of
    students? extended writing skills." It's a year 7 multi-ability class, 30 students.

    First of all, in terms of the English curriculum here in England, what exactly does "Extended Writing" mean? Is it as vague as it sounds? I haven't been able to find a straight definition online.

    Since I only have a short time, I was thinking of doing a brief lesson and activity on "showing vs. telling." In your teacherly opinions, would this be suitable?

    I'd really appreciate any help -- this is my first interview so i don't know exactly what to expect.

    Thanks!
    Erica
     
  2. Hi everyone,

    I'm an American teacher looking for a job here and I've just been invited to an interview. I've been asked to teach a lesson and the only instruction I was given is "Using a stimulus of your choice plan a 30 minute lesson to develop an aspect of
    students? extended writing skills." It's a year 7 multi-ability class, 30 students.

    First of all, in terms of the English curriculum here in England, what exactly does "Extended Writing" mean? Is it as vague as it sounds? I haven't been able to find a straight definition online.

    Since I only have a short time, I was thinking of doing a brief lesson and activity on "showing vs. telling." In your teacherly opinions, would this be suitable?

    I'd really appreciate any help -- this is my first interview so i don't know exactly what to expect.

    Thanks!
    Erica
     
  3. fishtail

    fishtail New commenter

    Extenmded writing means what it sounds like--writing that is developed and sustained. Hard to do it in half an hour, which is why they're saying an 'aspect', and if I were you I would focus on something very specific and manageable such as a particular technique.

    The main thing will be to make it snappy and engaging so that students are focused. They'll be looking for evidence that you set lesson objectives--even for 30 mins, explain what you are planning to teach, and how they will know that they've learned it--eg 'by the end of this lesson you will have written a paragraph...' except don't do that as you may have (in mixed ability) students who are not fantastic about extended writing, paragraphing and so on.

    If I were you, I would do something like similes and metaphors, with the objective to develop creative similes and metaphors and the success criteria to create at least three new similes or metaphors of your own. Try the game where they match up similes eg as brave as a lion, as quiet as a mouse (you could do this as a card-sort, which will really get them engaged) and then discuss what you could use to replace either side, eg as brave as a.....toddler determined to get an ice lolly, as quiet as a teacher listening to her class... and so on. You could introduce pictures for a bit more pzazz and for differentiation for the less able, for the more able give some literary examples, and get them to string them together into a descriptive paragraph. Or you could provide them with a bit o boring writing you have created, and get them to insert similes and metaphors to replace simple adjectives...

    Hope this helps... and good luck.
     
  4. I think a focus on show rather than tell would be better than the ubiquitous simile lesson. (Sorry, fishtail!) Good prose writing is about much more than imagery.
     

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