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Expected levels for 14 year olds

Discussion in 'Scotland - education news' started by creasey, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. I read in the papers recently that only 40% of 14 year olds (S2) reach the expected level for English and only 30% reach the expected level for maths. I wonder if any secondary English or Maths teachers would like to comment on this?
     
  2. I read in the papers recently that only 40% of 14 year olds (S2) reach the expected level for English and only 30% reach the expected level for maths. I wonder if any secondary English or Maths teachers would like to comment on this?
     
  3. halfajack

    halfajack Occasional commenter

    Where was it and what does it mean by levels? 5-14? We're not allowed to talk in 5-14 language anymore! :) If only 30/40% reach said 'levels' then why are they still 'expected?' At face value, all that means is they're expecting too much! In all seriousness, I imagine the article is referring to the previous target of level E by the end of S2. If so, the statistic isn't shocking when compared with my own school. However, my school is in a deprived area with typically lower aattaining pupils. In my previous school all of my S2 attained level E or F by the end of the year and they were not a 'top set.' I'd be surprised if other similar schools (I guess I'd say more mixed schools in terms of social backgrounds) I'd be surprised if it was lower than 50-60%.
     
  4. It was in a couple of different newspapers, and I realise they are slightly out of date now that the 5-14 is away.
    I didn't want to express an opinion before asking, but my initial reaction was that the expected level must be unrealistic if less than half of young people achieved it, but wanted to find out more from people who actually delivered this.

     
  5. I'm not a secondary teacher but, interestingly, I recently heard that one Scottish LA is asking all its primary CTs to make predictions for the children based on 5-14 levels.
    It would seem, therefore, that some LAs are not as supportive of CfE as they would like us to think they are.
     
  6. sbf

    sbf New commenter

    All our reporting levels are based on CfE now.
    I will be interested when i read the levels the current P7 kids are given in my subject area and giving them a wee test to see.

     
  7. halfajack

    halfajack Occasional commenter

    The trouble with that is CfE levels aren't, currently, appropriate for assessment the way 5-14 levels were as there are no real assessment criteria.
     
  8. halfajack

    halfajack Occasional commenter

    A sensible assumption to make. I did read one article from Saturday's Daily Mail which a friend pointed out. The friend thought I'd agree with everything in it and I thought I would too when I started reading about declining standards. Then I realised the journalist hadn't a clue what he was talking about when he said things like teachers aren't allowed to stretch the more able and the high pass rate in S Grades means they are worthless - clearly he knows nothing about the different S Grade levels and the rationale behind them. There were a number of other things which got my back up...oh yes, he referred to teachers as 'drones' and hugely exaggerated the lack of literacy and numeracy skills we all apparently have!
     
  9. Do you have a link to the Daily Nazi, oops, Mail?
     
  10. halfajack

    halfajack Occasional commenter

    No, sorry. I was shown the article in old-fashioned paper form.
     

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