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Exam board marking policy

Discussion in 'Secondary' started by lriggs, Jun 28, 2011.

  1. In this case, both students have made a
    decision that the crossed out answer is incorrect. I don't understand
    why marks are awarded if you only have a crossed out version.

    How do you personally deal with multiple uncrossed answers or multiple crossed out answers?

     
  2. The point of the question is whether this policy is standard practice. A student aware of this policy could use it to their advantage by providing alternative answers. Every school has a duty to inform it's student that this option is available to them if they are not sure how to answer a question. Which body is responsible for setting the guidelines that these exam bodies must follow.
     
  3. BillyBobJoe

    BillyBobJoe Occasional commenter

    For the AQA A-Level marking I've been doing, multiple answers are marked and then given the average mark of the two, rounding down (so on a 4 mark question, an answer worth 1 mark and an answer worth 2, both crossed out, would result in 1 mark being awarded).
     
  4. sleepyhead

    sleepyhead New commenter

    One of my GCSE students last year proudly told me that he had done all of the optional questions. Given that he had 45 minutes to do one, and had done 4, it was no surprise that he got rather lower marks than he should.
    It is of no advantage to suggest to students that they should "provide multiple answers if they're not sure how to answer" - the amount of time spent doing that will only cost them elsewhere, in my experience.
     
  5. markuss

    markuss Occasional commenter

    Iriggs, sorry, should have said that I'm marking English and when the crossing out occurs, it's because the candidate was doing a rough draft. It can happen that they spend a long time on rough drafting, cross it out and then find that time's run out. Very rare occurrence, though. Usually, they have time to at least start to redraft. Then I can just ignore the crossed out stuff.
    Multiple uncrossed out versions - I read everything and mark accordingly. Credit the good and penalise the bad. (I'm talking about marking for Writing - not answers to Reading questions. There, it would depend on the mark scheme instructions.)
    Multiple crossed out versions and no uncrossed out one? I'd ask my line manager! Guess the answer would be mark the last one.
     
  6. gruoch

    gruoch Occasional commenter

    For the A level Eng Lit I mark, the policy is to mark all answers attempted and award the highest mark. Anything crossed out is ignored.
    To be honest, anyone who attempts a question on a book they haven't studied because it happens to be the first question on the paper, isn't likely to get a high mark, anyway.

     
  7. strawbs

    strawbs Occasional commenter

    Our advice from AQA is if there are multiple uncrossed out answers on the answer line then they will ALL be ignored - ie no answer marks will be given.
    If there is only one uncrossed and all the rest crossed out then only the uncrossed ones will be marked.
    A crossed out answer that is legible may be given marks (can't remember if the multiple crossings out was mentioned, but I suspect it defaults to case 1 I mentioned above; ie no marks)
    Method Marks may be given for different approaches taken.
     
  8. ScienceGuy

    ScienceGuy Occasional commenter

    For OCR A level they would not be awarded all the marks as they automtically lose marks if they contradict themselves which would be the case if they give multiple answers. As time is a massive factor, particularly in the A2 exams, any student trying to give multiple answers would be penalising themselves as they would not be able to complete the paper.
     

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