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Exam appeals - charge if successful?

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by rachel_g41, Sep 16, 2011.

  1. rachel_g41

    rachel_g41 Occasional commenter

    This is not a specific language enquiry but there's been more discussion on this forum than on any other so I thought I'd post here as well as Secondary.



    Several of our students have appealed their Edexcel exam grades and in several subjects. Most of them have had their grades increased as a result.

    However it's costing them a fortune.
    I was under the impression that if a grade was increased then there was no charge for the appeal. Is this wrong?
     
  2. rachel_g41

    rachel_g41 Occasional commenter

    This is not a specific language enquiry but there's been more discussion on this forum than on any other so I thought I'd post here as well as Secondary.



    Several of our students have appealed their Edexcel exam grades and in several subjects. Most of them have had their grades increased as a result.

    However it's costing them a fortune.
    I was under the impression that if a grade was increased then there was no charge for the appeal. Is this wrong?
     
  3. chriszwinter

    chriszwinter New commenter

    The way we work it is that the candidate pays for the remark and, if it is successful, the school reimburses him or her. In my opinion, if the exam board gets it wrong then the exam board should not charge anything, but that leads to the fact that appeals bring in the money. They would happily charge anything for a remark and then turn it down just the for the money.
     
  4. rachel_g41

    rachel_g41 Occasional commenter

    So, the exam boards take the money even though it's their mistake? That really is shocking and surely calls into question the integrity of the whole system.
    Is that also why they now give students info about how close they were to the next grade up - to encourage appeals?

     
  5. rachel_g41

    rachel_g41 Occasional commenter

    And sorry, in my indignation I forgot to say thank you for the reply.
     
  6. chriszwinter

    chriszwinter New commenter

    You're welcome, and no apology needed. I'm as angry as you are. It's a nice little money spinner, isn't it? Here's an example from about 3 years ago. A student was annoyed that her genuine hard work resulted in a grade E and applied for a remark to the tune of £135, and her E became a D. The school, i.e. the taxpayer, duly reimbursed that money. The same year a GCSE grade D became a C when the mark for the speaking test increased the UMS by 1. We then gave the money back - £30. On both occasions, AQA were wrong and pocketed the money for the privilege.
    Also, to take AS as a an example, if a student's AS grade is below his/her target grade, the pressure is double: first on the school because of the need to get to the target grade and even exceed it for the purposes of all that value added stuff, and second on the student who may well be happy with the grade and doesn't care about the FFT or Alps target. If the remark fails, the candidate can always resit.
    If they didn't charge, everyone would challenge every grade, but when they get it wrong, they should refund the charge My understanding is that they don't.
    Another example has me incensed. At AS and A2 the enhanced results analysis has the marks for individual questions and subquestions for Fren/Germ/Span1 and Fren/Germ/Span3, but not for the speaking tests. The reason given is that units 1 and 3 are marked online and the marks collected and stored electronically, while units 2 and 4 are marked manually and entered on the STMS. It would cost too much time to transfer those marks, but if you want to see them you can ask for a <u>photocopy</u> of the STMS - at &pound;4 a time.
    Of course, the exam boards or awarding bodies are educational charities and are not run to make a profit.
     

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