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Evidence of childrens work for ofsted

Discussion in 'Primary' started by annap3, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. annap3

    annap3 New commenter

    I've been in my new school one year and just wondered how you went about keeping a record of the kids work for ofsted? At the moment, each class hands in examples of top, middle and bottom books which are stored for 3 years but, as a subject co-ordinator, I don't actually get to see any of these exemplar books which worries me a bit!
    I can see how this works for literacy and maths but what about foundation subjects? I'm thinking about creating Big Books for foundation subjects in which work and planning can be collated and presented in a more interesting and creative way.
    How do you evidence children's work and planning in your school?
     
  2. annap3

    annap3 New commenter

    I've been in my new school one year and just wondered how you went about keeping a record of the kids work for ofsted? At the moment, each class hands in examples of top, middle and bottom books which are stored for 3 years but, as a subject co-ordinator, I don't actually get to see any of these exemplar books which worries me a bit!
    I can see how this works for literacy and maths but what about foundation subjects? I'm thinking about creating Big Books for foundation subjects in which work and planning can be collated and presented in a more interesting and creative way.
    How do you evidence children's work and planning in your school?
     
  3. littlerussell

    littlerussell New commenter

    Why?
    The OFSTED process is much more straightforward and much less negotiable than people seem to think, particularly when it comes to standards.
    OFSTED only want to see one thing when looking at work ... are the children achieving standards which are appropriate to their age and ability? Keeping books (not sure why three years?) is usually in case they pop up in the early Autumn term and there isn't any current evidence in school to show them.
    Unless you have a subject inspection (assume that 20 of 14,000 schools will get this in your subject next year ... a 0.1% chance of that happening), they are unlikely to give your subject 'evidence' more than a cursory glance when looking at the whole school picture.
    There are two reasons why you would be wasting your time. Firstly, no amount of interesting and creative presentation will change any judgement they are going to make as you can't change the 'standard' by presenting it differently. Secondly, it will be out of date by Christmas, since they won't even look at it after that and will sample the children's current books instead.
     
  4. annap3

    annap3 New commenter

    A series of very good points - thank you. I was concerned about HMI subject inspections but you're right, presenting work beautifully will make sod all difference.
    Thanks for the common sense. Will open wine and try to remember that it's the holidays!
     
  5. For future for subject might be useful to ask for evidence or progression of skills across phases in work and planning and depending on subject you might want to give suggestions as to how that work is presented eg for DT might be annotated photo
     
  6. Never mind OfSted - you mentioned "interesting" and "creative". Think along these lines for your subject and the children will benefit. Making a Big Book just for OfSted is a waste of time. Making Big Books for the children to appreciate is not. Don't do things for OfSted's benefit: they are just there to tick boxes and make you jump through hoops. Making the subject interesting and being creative is more important.
     

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