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'Everyone in education should have the same new year's resolution – to end stress-related illness'

Discussion in 'Education news' started by TES_Rosaline, Jan 3, 2018.

  1. TES_Rosaline

    TES_Rosaline Administrator Staff Member

    David Jones is a primary school headteacher who believes that the whole school community should work together to try to find a solution to stress-related illnesses:

    ‘I would like to propose that 2018 is the year in which we all take a firm decision to find solutions to the problem of stress-related illness in schools; the year in which we take significant steps in adding a little light into the murky glass in front of us. We have the creativity, within every school, to do this. Maybe we could begin with generating ideas from the children, because, ultimately, pressure and stress does filter down to them.’

    I’m sure that reducing work-related stress is usually on people’s wish-list regardless of what time of the year it is, but what more can school communities do to make teachers’ lives and their pupils easier? What is your school doing to try to reduce stress or the workload for teachers? Are there services or initiatives available in your school to help promote mental health for teachers and pupils?

    https://www.tes.com/news/school-new...uld-have-same-new-years-resolution-end-stress
     
  2. applecrumblebumble

    applecrumblebumble Established commenter

    Let’s start with this one, often children make the teacher do all the work. I wonder how his model would work, pass the problem upwards and ask them to solve the problem of work related stress.
     
    TCSC47 likes this.
  3. moscowbore

    moscowbore Occasional commenter

    What utter, utter tosh.

    Pathetic attention seeking soundbite generator has been switched on again.
    Let us get the students to come up with ideas.I am sure that having free lollipops at breaktime will lead to a huge reduction in teacher stress.

    A head teacher has the power to get rid of pointless multi-marking policies, pointless mock-STEDs, pointless assessments every 5 minutes and most of all has the power to put policies in place which aid teaching and learning and are not motivated by a need to appease OFSTED. Instead this head teacher wants to get the students to come up with solutions.

    A cynical person could conclude that TES is coming up with carp like this to get more controversial topics down the list. Or is it just click-bait?
     
  4. secretsiren

    secretsiren Star commenter

    Stress is often caused by a total lack of autonomy in the workplace and a feeling of being unable to control anything. Headteachers should acknowledge the damage done by Ofsted-pleasing policies and do their best to reduce pointless busy-work. That'd help.
     
    TCSC47 likes this.
  5. TCSC47

    TCSC47 Lead commenter

    As per secretsiren above, stress is almost always caused by not being in control of your situation. Now, think of 30 children all doing their nature intended job of being a child and demanding attention from the adult. And there you have it! Stress! And this is all before you factor in OFSTED and the greasy pole climbing politicians helping themselves to the backs of teachers.
     
  6. calamansi

    calamansi Lead commenter

    "IT'S ALL ABOUT EVIDENCE! EVIDENCE! EVIDENCE!" the HT barked at me.
    This was eight or nine years ago, at a time when it was (mistakenly, 'apparently') believed that every point on the huge Early Years FS attained by 3-4 year-olds had to be recorded and backed up with written or photographic 'evidence'.

    That is the kind of pressure that causes stress, and in pressured HTs too.
     
  7. calamansi

    calamansi Lead commenter

    Wellness to an old boss of mine meant looking after ourselves so that we didn't get ill in term time.

    An occasional thank you for work well done might have been more effective!
     

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